174 Works

Data from: How to quantify a distance-dependent landscape effect on a biological response

Paul Miguet, Lenore Fahrig & Claire Lavigne
To quantify the effect of the surrounding landscape context on a biological response at a site, most studies measure landscape variables within discs centred on this biological response (threshold-based method). This implicitly assumes that the effect of a unit area of the landscape is consistent up to a threshold distance beyond which it drops to zero. However, it seems more likely that the landscape effect declines with increasing distance from the biological response point. Here...

Data from: Fungal adaptation to contemporary fungicide applications: the case of Botrytis cinerea populations from Champagne vineyards (France)

Anne-Sophie Walker, Virginie Ravigné, Adrien Rieux, S. Ali, F. Carpentier, Elisabeth Fournier, V. Ravigne & A.-S. Walker
In addition to being one of the most acute problems impeding chemical control of fungal diseases, the evolution of fungicide resistance is an emblematic case of local adaptation to spatially heterogeneous and temporally variable selection pressures. Here we dissected the adaptation of Botrytis cinerea (the causal agent of grey mould) populations on grapes to several fungicides. We carried out a 2-year survey (four collection dates) on three treated/untreated pairs of plots from vineyards in Champagne...

Data from: Sylleptic branching in winter-headed apple (Malus × domestica) trees: accession-dependent responses and their relationships with other tree architectural characteristics

Stijn Vanderzande, Niek Hias, Daniel Edge-Garza, Evelyne Costes, Mark W. Davey & Johan Keulemans
Well-feathered apple trees are essential for commercial orchards to optimize yields. However, most cultivars do not form these sylleptic branches readily in commercial nurseries due to high apical dominance. Several treatments exist to promote their formation in the nurseries, one of which is heading. However, not all cultivars are expected to react similarly to these treatments. We studied the branching response of 155 genotypes following heading and its relation to other architectural traits as a...

Data from: Neighborhood effects determine plant-herbivore interactions below ground

Wei Huang, Elias Zwimpfer, Maxime R. Hervé, Zoe Bont & Matthias Erb
1. Plant neighbors can strongly influence the interactions between herbivores and focal plants, for instance by providing food of different quality (consumptive effects) or by changing the behavior and metabolism of the herbivore and the focal plant without being consumed (non-consumptive effects). Determining the species-specific contributions of consumptive and non-consumptive effects is important to understand the ecophysiological mechanisms which underlie neighborhood effects. 2. We quantified the impact of nine different grassland plant species on the...

Data from: Grape moth density in Bordeaux vineyards depends on local habitat management despite effects of landscape heterogeneity on their biological control

Adrien Rusch, Lionel Delbac & Denis Thiéry
1. Biological control of crop pests is a major ecosystem service affected by several variables acting at multiple spatial scales. Among these variables, heterogeneity at the habitat and landscape scales are known key drivers of trophic interactions and pest density in agroecosystems. However, studies that try to disentangle their relative effects in perennial cropping systems are scarce and nothing is known about their impacts on insect pest density and pesticide applications. 2. We examined the...

Data from: Biological traits, rather than environment, shape detection curves of large vertebrates in neotropical rainforests

Thomas Denis, Cécile Richard-Hansen, Olivier Brunaux, Marie-Pierre Etienne, Stéphane Guitet & Bruno Hérault
Line transect surveys are widely used in neotropical rainforests to estimate the population abundance of medium- and large-sized vertebrates. The use of indices such as Encounter Rate has been criticized because the probability of animal detection may fluctuate due to the heterogeneity of environmental conditions among sites. In addition, the morphological and behavioral characteristics (biological traits) of species affect their detectability. In this study, we compared the extent to which environmental conditions and species’ biological...

Data from: Integrating encounter theory with decision analysis to evaluate collision risk and determine optimal protection zones for wildlife

Bradley J. Udell, Julien Martin, , Mathieu Bonneau, Holly Edwards, Timothy A. Gowan, Stacie K. Hardy, Eliezer Gurarie, Charles Calleson, Charles J. Deutsch, Robert J. Fletcher & Charles S. Calleson
1. Better understanding human-wildlife interactions and their links with management can help improve the design of wildlife protection zones. One important example is the problem of wildlife collisions with vehicles or human-built structures (e.g. power lines, wind farms). In fact, collisions between marine wildlife and watercraft are among the major threats faced by several endangered species of marine mammals. Natural resource managers are therefore interested in finding cost-effective solutions to mitigate these threats. 2. We...

Data from: Tree, sex and size: ecological determinants of male versus female fecundity in three Fagus sylvatica stands

Sylvie Oddou-Muratorio, Julie Gauzere, Aurore Bontemps, Jean-François Rey & Etienne K. Klein
Inter-individual variation in fecundities has major consequences on population evolutionary potential, through genetic drift and selection. Using two spatially explicit mating models that analyze the genotypes of seeds and seedlings, we investigated the variation of male and female fecundities within and among three European beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands situated along an elevational gradient. Female and male individual fecundity distributions were both skewed in this monoecious species, and we found a higher variance in female as...

Data from: Inferring the demographic history underlying parallel genomic divergence among pairs of parasitic and nonparasitic lamprey ecotypes

Quentin Rougemont, Pierre-Alexandre Gagnaire, Charles Perrier, Clémence Genthon, Anne-Laure Besnard, Sophie Launey & Guillaume Evanno
Understanding the evolutionary mechanisms generating parallel genomic divergence patterns among replicate ecotype pairs remains an important challenge in speciation research. We investigated the genomic divergence between the anadromous parasitic river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) and the freshwater-resident nonparasitic brook lamprey (Lampetra planeri) in nine population pairs displaying variable levels of geographic connectivity. We genotyped 338 individuals with RAD sequencing and inferred the demographic divergence history of each population pair using a diffusion approximation method. Divergence patterns...

Data from: Shifts and linkages of functional diversity between above- and below-ground compartments along a flooding gradient

Corentin Abgrall, Matthieu Chauvat, Estelle Langlois, Mickaël Hedde, David Mouillot, Sandrine Salmon, Bruna Winck & Estelle Forey
Trait-based approaches have the potential to reveal general and predictive relationships between organisms and ecosystem functioning. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional structure of communities are still unclear. Within terrestrial ecosystems, several studies have shown that many ecological processes are controlled by the interacting above- and below-ground compartments. However, few studies have used traits to reveal the functional relationships between plants and soil fauna. Mostly, research combining plants and soil fauna solely used the traits...

Data from: Spatial scale and intraspecific trait variability mediate assembly rules in alpine grasslands

Loïc Chalmandrier, Tamara Münkemüller, Marie-Pascale Colace, Julien Renaud, Serge Aubert, Bradley Z. Carlson, Jean Christophe Clement, Nicolas Legay, Gilles Pellet, Amélie Saillard, Sebastien Lavergne & Wilfried Thuiller
Assembly of grassland communities has long been scrutinized through the lens of functional diversity. Studies generally point to an overwhelming influence of climate on observed patterns of functional diversity, despite experimental evidence demonstrating the importance of biotic interactions. We postulate that this is because most observational studies neglect both scale dependencies of assembly processes and phenotypic variation between individuals. Here, we test for changes in the importance of abiotic filtering and biotic interactions along a...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure in South African, French and Argentinian Angora Goats from genome-wide SNP data

Carina Visser, Simon F. Lashmar, Este Van Marle Koster, Mario A. Poli, Daniel Allain & Este Van Marle-Köster
The Angora goat populations in Argentina (AR), France (FR) and South Africa (SA) have been kept geographically and genetically distinct. Due to country-specific selection and breeding strategies, there is a need to characterize the populations on a genetic level. In this study we analysed genetic variability of Angora goats from three distinct geographical regions using the standardized 50k Goat SNP Chip. A total of 104 goats (AR: 30; FR: 26; SA: 48) were genotyped. Heterozygosity...

Data from: A novel locus on chromosome 1 underlies the evolution of a melanic plumage polymorphism in a wild songbird

Yann X.C. Bourgeois, Boris Delahaie, Mathieu Gautier, Emeline Lhuillier, Pierre-Jean G. Malé, Joris A.M. Bertrand, Josselin Cornuault, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Olivier Bouchez, Claire Mould, Jade Bruxaux, Hélène Holota, Borja Mila, Christophe Thébaud, Joris A. M. Bertrand & Yann X. C. Bourgeois
Understanding the mechanisms responsible for phenotypic diversification within and among species ultimately rests with linking naturally occurring mutations to functionally and ecologically significant traits. Colour polymorphisms are of great interest in this context because discrete colour patterns within a population are often controlled by just a few genes in a common environment. We investigated how and why phenotypic diversity arose and persists in the Zosterops borbonicus white-eye of Reunion (Mascarene archipelago), a colour polymorphic songbird...

Data from: Finding the best management policy to eradicate invasive species from spatial ecological networks with simultaneous actions

Sam Nicol, Régis Sabbadin, Nathalie Peyrard & Iadine Chades
1. Spatial management of invasive species is more likely to be successful when multiple locations are treated simultaneously. However, selecting the best locations to act is difficult due to the many options available at any time. 2. We design a near-optimal policy for applying multiple actions simultaneously for faster invasive species control within a network. Our method uses a recent optimisation tool, the Graph-based Markov decision process (GMDP). Since the policy can be difficult to...

Data from: Genome scans reveal candidate regions involved in the adaptation to host plant in the pea aphid complex

Julie Jaquiéry, Solenn Stoeckel, Pierre Nouhaud, Lucie Mieuzet, Frédérique Mahéo, Fabrice Legeai, Nina Bernard, Antoine Bonvoisin, Renaud Vitalis & Jean-Christophe Simon
A major goal in evolutionary biology is to uncover the genetic basis of adaptation. Divergent selection exerted on ecological traits may result in adaptive population differentiation and reproductive isolation and affect differentially the level of genetic divergence along the genome. Genome-wide scan of large sets of individuals from multiple populations is a powerful approach to identify loci or genomic regions under ecologically divergent selection. Here, we focused on the pea aphid, a species complex of...

Data from: A virus responds instantly to the presence of the vector on the host and forms transmission morphs

Alexandre Martinière, Aurélie Bak, Jean-Luc Macia, Nicole Lautredou, Daniel Gargani, Juliette Doumayrou, Elisa Garzo, Aranzazu Moreno, Alberto Fereres, Stéphane Blanc & Martin Drucker
Many plant and animal viruses are spread by insect vectors. Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is aphid-transmitted, with the virus being taken up from specialized transmission bodies (TB) formed within infected plant cells. However, the precise events during TB-mediated virus acquisition by aphids are unknown. Here, we show that TBs react instantly to the presence of the vector by ultra-rapid and reversible redistribution of their key components onto microtubules throughout the cell. Enhancing or inhibiting this...

Data from: Next-generation sequencing to inventory taxonomic diversity in eukaryotic communities: a test for freshwater diatoms

Lenaïg Kermarrec, Alain Franc, Frédéric Rimet, Philippe Chaumeil, Jean-François Humbert, Agnès Bouchez & J. F. Humbert
The recent emergence of barcoding approaches coupled to those of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) have raised new perspectives for studying environmental communities. In this framework, we tested the possibility to derive accurate inventories of diatom communities from pyrosequencing outputs with an available DNA reference library. We used three molecular markers targeting the nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes (SSU rDNA, rbcL, and cox1), and three samples of a mock community composed of 30 known diatom strains...

Data from: Reduction of leaf area and symptom severity as proxies of disease-induced plant mortality: the example of the Cauliflower mosaic virus infecting two Brassicaceae hosts

Juliette Doumayrou, Sophie Leblaye, Rémy Froissart & Yannis Michalakis
Disease induced effects on host survival are important to understand the evolution of parasitic virulence and host resistance/tolerance. Unfortunately, experiments evaluating such effects are in most cases logistically demanding justifying the measurement of survival proxies. For plant hosts commonly used proxies are leaf area and the nature and severity of visual qualitative disease symptoms. In this study we tested whether these traits are indeed correlated to the host mortality rate induced by viral infection. We...

Data from: DNA barcoding reveals a largely unknown fauna of Gracillariidae leaf-mining moths in the Neotropics

D. C. Lees, A. Y. Kawahara, R. Rougerie, I. Ohshima, A. Kawakita, O. Bouteleux, J. De Prins & C. Lopez-Vaamonde
Higher taxa often show increasing species richness towards tropical low latitudes, a pattern known as the latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG). A rare reverse LBG (with greater richness towards temperate high latitudes) is exhibited by Gracillariidae leaf-mining moths, in which most described species occur in northern temperate areas. We carried out the first assessment of gracillariid species diversity in two Neotropical regions to test whether the relatively low tropical species diversity of this family is genuine...

Data from: Temporal population genetics of time travelling insects: a long term longitudinal study in a seed-specialized wasp

Marie Suez, Cindy Gidoin, François Lefèvre, Jean-Noël Candau, Alain Chalon & Thomas Boivin
Many animal species experiencing spatial or interannual fluctuations of their environment are capable of prolonged diapause, a kind of dormancy that extends over more than one year. Such a prolonged diapause is commonly perceived as a temporal demographic refuge in stochastic environments, but empirical evidence is still lacking of its consequences on temporal population genetic structures. In this long-term study, we investigated how a particular pattern of prolonged diapause may influence the temporal population genetics...

Data from: Detecting short spatial scale local adaptation and epistatic selection in climate-related candidate genes in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) populations

Katalin Csilléry, Hadrien Lalagüe, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Santiago C. González-Martínez, Bruno Fady & Sylvie Oddou-Muratorio
Detecting signatures of selection in tree populations threatened by climate change is currently a major research priority. Here, we investigated the signature of local adaptation over a short spatial scale using 96 European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) individuals originating from two pairs of populations on the northern and southern slopes of Mont Ventoux (south-eastern France). We performed both single and multilocus analysis of selection based on 53 climate-related candidate genes containing 546 SNPs. FST outlier...

Data from: Host range expansion of native insects to exotic trees increases with area of introduction and presence of congeneric native trees

Manuela Branco, Eckehard G. Brockerhoff, Bastien Castagneyrol, Christophe Orazio & Hervé Jactel
1. Exotic tree species are widely used in forest plantations for their often high productivity and performance compared to native trees. However, these advantages may be compromised by herbivore damage. 2. A list of European insect species that have expanded their host range to one of 28 exotic tree species introduced to Europe was compiled from a systematic literature review. The number of successful expansions was analysed using three predictors: (1) phylogenetic relatedness between exotic...

Data from: \"Transcriptomic resources for Hazelnut tree (Corylus avellana L.)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2015 to 31 September 2015

Isabelle Lesur, Annegret Kohler, Francis Martin, Antoine Kremer, Christophe Plomion & Grégoire Le Provost
This article documents the public availability of transcriptome sequence data, assembled contigs, annotated contigs and molecular markers for Hazelnut tree (Corylus avellana).

Data from: Morphological drivers of trophic cascades

Clémentine Renneville, Arnaud Le Rouzic, Michel Baylac, Alexis Millot, Stéphane Loisel & Eric Edeline
Worldwide, local anthropogenic extinctions have recently been reported to induce trophic cascades, defined as perturbations of top consumers that propagate along food chains down to primary producers. This focus on the effects of top-consumer extinction (i.e. of species presence) ignores potential cascading effects of the rapid morphological changes that may precede extinction. Here, we show in an experimental, three-level food chain including medaka fish, herbivorous zooplankton and unicellular algae that varying body length of a...

Data from: Evidence of divergent selection for drought and cold tolerance at landscape and local scales in Abies alba Mill. in the French Mediterranean Alps

Anna M. Roschanski, Katalin Csilléry, Sascha Liepelt, Sylvie Oddou-Muratorio, Birgit Ziegenhagen, Frédéric Huard, Kristian K. Ullrich, Dragos Postolache, Giovanni G. Vendramin & Bruno Fady
Understanding local adaptation in forest trees is currently a key research and societal priority. Geographically and ecologically marginal populations provide ideal case studies, because environmental stress along with reduced gene flow can facilitate the establishment of locally adapted populations. We sampled European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) trees in the French Mediterranean Alps, along the margin of its distribution range, from pairs of high and low elevation plots on four different mountains situated along a...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    6
  • 2019
    5
  • 2018
    23
  • 2017
    25
  • 2016
    28
  • 2015
    37
  • 2014
    20
  • 2013
    21
  • 2012
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    174

Affiliations

  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    174
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    54
  • University of Bordeaux
    19
  • Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement
    8
  • Montpellier SupAgro
    7
  • University of Montpellier
    6
  • University of Liège
    5
  • Ecologie des Forêts Méditerranéennes
    5
  • University of Toulouse
    4
  • University of Lausanne
    4