174 Works

Data from: Cheaper isn’t always worse: more protective isolates of a defensive symbiont are less costly to the aphid host

Luis Cayetano, Lukas Rothacher, Jean-Christophe Simon, Christoph Vorburger & J.-C. Simon
Defences against parasites are typically associated with costs to the host that contribute to the maintenance of variation in resistance. This also applies to the defence provided by the facultative bacterial endosymbiont Hamiltonella defensa, which protects its aphid hosts against parasitoid wasps while imposing life-history costs. To investigate the cost–benefit relationship within protected hosts, we introduced multiple isolates of H. defensa to the same genetic backgrounds of black bean aphids, Aphis fabae, and we quantified...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of wild/weedy eggplant (Solanum insanum L., Solanaceae) in southern India: implications for conservation

Evans Mutegi, Allison A. Snow, Rajkumar Mathu, Remy Pasquest, Hopeland Ponniah, Marie-Christine Daunay, Priya Davidar & Muthu Rajkumar
Mutegi et al eggplant SSR dataAn excel file with microsatellite data for the 10 natural populations of wild/weedy eggplant (S. insanum) and the 3 cultivar populations studied. A sheet with metadata to describe the fields is included.Mutegi et al Eggplant data1.xlsx

Data from: Short-term variations in gene flow related to cyclic density fluctuations in the common vole

Bertrand Gauffre, Karine Berthier, Pablo Inchausti, Yannick Chaval, Jean-François Cosson & Vincent Bretagnolle
In highly fluctuating populations with complex social systems genetic patterns are likely to vary in space and time due to demographic and behavioural processes. Cyclic rodents are extreme examples of demographically instable populations that often exhibit strong social organisation. In such populations, kin structure and spacing behaviour may vary with density fluctuations and impact both the composition and spatial structure of genetic diversity. In this study, we analysed the multiannual genetic structure of a cyclic...

Data from: Genomic regions repeatedly involved in divergence among plant-specialized pea aphid biotypes

Pierre Nouhaud, Jean Peccoud, Frédérique Mahéo, Lucie Mieuzet, Julie Jaquiéry & Jean-Christophe Simon
Understanding the genetic bases of biological diversification is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology. Here we investigate whether replicated cases of adaptive divergence involve the same genomic regions in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, a large complex of genetically differentiated biotypes, each specialized on different species of legumes. A previous study identified genomic regions putatively involved in host-plant adaptation and/or reproductive isolation by performing a hierarchical genome scan in three biotypes. This led to the...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional composition of arthropod assemblages across contrasting Amazonian forests

P. A. Greg Lamarre, Bruno Hérault, Paul V. A. Fine, Vincent Vedel, Roland Lupoli, Italo Mesones, Christopher Baraloto & Greg P. A. Lamarre
Arthropods represent most of global biodiversity, with the highest diversity found in tropical rainforests. Nevertheless, we have a very incomplete understanding of how tropical arthropod communities are assembled. We conducted a comprehensive mass-sampling of arthropod communities within three major habitat types of lowland Amazonian rainforest, including terra firme clay, white-sand, and seasonally-flooded forests in Peru and French Guiana. We examined how taxonomic and functional composition (at the family level) differed across these habitat types in...

Data from: Local human pressures influence gene flow in a hybridizing Daphnia species complex

Benjamin Alric, Markus Möst, Isabelle Domaizon, Cecile Pignol, Piet Spaak & Marie-Elodie Perga
Anthropogenic environmental changes are considered critical drivers of the genetic structure of populations and communities through, for example, the facilitation of introgressive hybridization between syntopic species. However, the mechanisms by which environmental perturbations trigger changes in the genetic structure of populations and communities, such as the processes that determine the directionality of hybridization and patterns of mitochondrial introgression over many generations, remain largely unexplored. In this study, the changes in genetic structure of hybridizing members...

Data from: Recasting the dynamic equilibrium model through a functional lens: the interplay of trait-based community assembly and climate

Jessy Loranger, Cyrille Violle, Bill Shipley, Sandra Lavorel, Anne Bonis, Pablo Cruz, Frédérique Louault, Grégory Loucougaray, François Mesléard, Nicole Yavercovski & Éric Garnier
1. According to the dynamic equilibrium hypothesis (DEH), plant species richness is locally controlled by productivity and disturbance. Given that regional conditions widely affect local environmental variables such as soil nutrient availability, the DEH predictions could be improved by considering how climate influences local controls of species richness. Further, a trait-based approach to community assembly has the potential to reveal a deeper, mechanistic understanding of species richness variation across environments. Here we bring together DEH...

Data from: The power of evolutionary rescue is constrained by genetic load

Gavin S. Stewart, Madeline R. Morris, Allison B. Genis, Marianna Szűcs, Brett A. Melbourne, Simon J. Tavener & Ruth A. Hufbauer
Extinction risk of small isolated populations in changing environments can be reduced by rapid adaptation and subsequent growth to larger, less vulnerable sizes. Whether this process, called evolutionary rescue, is able to reduce extinction risk and sustain population growth over multiple generations is largely unknown. To understand the consequences of adaptive evolution as well as maladaptive processes in small isolated populations, we subjected experimental Tribolium castaneum populations founded with 10 or 40 individuals to novel...

Data from: Improving spatial predictions of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity

Manuela D'Amen, Ruben G. Mateo, Julien Pottier, Wilfried Thuiller, Luigi Maiorano, Loïc Pellissier, Charlotte Ndiribe, Nicolas Salamin & Antoine Guisan
1. In this study, we compare two community modelling approaches to determine their ability to predict the taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic properties of plant assemblages along a broad elevation gradient and at a fine resolution. The first method is the standard stacking individual species distribution modelling (SSDM) approach, which applies a simple environmental filter to predict species assemblages. The second method couples the SSDM and macroecological modelling (MEM - SSDM-MEM) approaches to impose a limit...

Data from: Tropical rainforests that persisted: inferences from the Quaternary demographic history of eight tree species in the Guiana shield

Stéphanie Barthe, Giorgio Binelli, Bruno Hérault, Caroline Scotti-Saintagne, Daniel Sabatier & Ivan Scotti
How Quaternary climatic and geological disturbances influenced the composition of Neotropical forests is hotly debated. Rainfall and temperature changes during and/or immediately after the last glacial maximum (LGM) are thought to have strongly affected the geographical distribution and local abundance of tree species. The paucity of the fossil records in Neotropical forests prevents a direct reconstruction of such processes. To describe community-level historical trends in forest composition, we turned therefore to inferential methods based on...

Data from: How do functional traits syndromes covary with growth and reproductive performance in a water-stressed population of Fagus sylvatica?

Aurore Bontemps, Hendrik Davi, François Lefèvre, Philippe Rozenberg & Sylvie Oddou-Muratorio
A central issue in plant evolutionary ecology is to understand how several coordinated suites of traits (i.e. traits syndrome) may be jointly selected within a single species. This study aims to describe patterns of variation and co-variation of functional traits in a water-stressed tree population and test their relationships with performance traits. Within a Mediterranean population of Fagus sylvatica experiencing recurrent summer droughts, we investigated the phenotypic variation of leaf unfolding phenology, Leaf Area (LA),...

Data from: Modelling unbiased dispersal kernels over continuous space by accounting for spatial heterogeneity in marking and observation efforts

Joël Chadoeuf, Alexandre Millon, Jean-Luc Bourrioux, Thierry Printemps, Benoit Van Hecke, Vincent Lecoustre & Vincent Bretagnolle
1. Although a key demographic trait determining the spatial dynamics of wild populations, dispersal is notoriously difficult to estimate in the field. Indeed, dispersal distances obtained from the monitoring of marked individuals typically lead to biased estimations of dispersal kernels as a consequence of i) restricted spatial scale of the study areas compared to species potential dispersal and ii) heterogeneity in marking and observation efforts and therfore in detection probability across space. 2. Here we...

Data from: The roots of the drought: hydrology and water uptake strategies mediate forest-wide demographic response to precipitation

Rutuja Chitra-Tarak, Laurent Ruiz, H. S. Dattaraja, M. S. Mohan Kumar, Jean Riotte, H. S. Suresh, Sean M. McMahon & Raman Sukumar
Drought-induced tree mortality is expected to increase globally due to climate change, with profound implications for forest composition, function and global climate feedbacks. How drought is experienced by different species is thought to depend fundamentally on where they access water vertically below ground, but this remains untracked so far due to the difficulty of measuring water availability at depths at which plants access water (few to several tens of meters), the broad temporal scales at...

Data from: Insular woody daisies (Argyranthemum , Asteraceae) are more resistant to drought-induced hydraulic failure than their herbaceous relatives

Larissa C. Doria, Diego S. Podadera, Marcelino Del Arco, Thibaud Chauvin, Erik Smets, Sylvain Delzon & Frederic Lens
1. Insular woodiness refers to the evolutionary transition from herbaceousness towards derived woodiness on (sub)tropical islands, and leads to island floras that have a higher proportion of woody species compared to floras of nearby continents. 2. Several hypotheses have tried to explain insular woodiness since Darwin’s original observations, but experimental evidence why plants became woody on islands is scarce at best. 3. Here, we combine experimental measurements of hydraulic failure in stems (as a proxy...

Data from: A nuclear DNA barcode for eastern North American oaks and application to a study of hybridization in an Arboretum setting

Elisabeth Fitzek, Adline Delcamp, Erwan Guichouc, Marlene Hahn, Matthew Lobdell, Andrew L. Hipp & Erwan Guichoux
DNA barcoding has proved difficult in a number of woody plant genera, including the ecologically important oak genus Quercus. In this study, we utilized restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) to develop an economical single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA barcoding system that suffices to distinguish eight common, sympatric eastern North American white oak species. Two de novo clustering pipelines, PyRAD and Stacks, were used in combination with post-clustering bioinformatic tools to generate a list of 291 potential...

Data from: Plant demographic and functional responses to management intensification: a long-term study in a Mediterranean rangeland

Eric Garnier, Adeline Fayolle, Marie-Laure Navas, Christian Damgaard, Pablo Cruz, Daniel Hubert, Jean Richarte, Paul Autran, Corentin Leurent & Cyrille Violle
1. Understanding how functional traits, which are key for plant functioning, relate to demographic parameters of populations is central to tackle pending issues in plant ecology such as the forecast of the fate of populations and communities in a changing world, the quantification of community assembly processes or the improvement of species distribution models. We addressed this question in the case of species from a Mediterranean rangeland of southern France. 2. Changes in species abundance...

Data from: Signatures of local adaptation in candidate genes of oaks (Quercus spp.) in respect to present and future climatic conditions

Christian Rellstab, Stefan Zoller, Lorenz Walthert, Isabelle Lesur, Andrea R. Pluess, René Graf, Catherine Bodénès, Christoph Sperisen, Antoine Kremer & Felix Gugerli
Testing how populations are locally adapted and predicting their response to their future environment is of key importance in view of climate change. Landscape genomics is a powerful approach to investigate genes and environmental factors involved in local adaptation. In a pooled amplicon sequencing approach of 94 genes in 71 populations, we tested if >3'500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the three most common oak species in Switzerland (Quercus petraea, Q. pubescens, Q. robur) show...

Data from: Trait-matching and mass effect determine the functional response of herbivore communities to land use intensification

Gaëtane Le Provost, Nicolas Gross, Luca Börger, Hélène Deraison, Marilyn Roncoroni & Isabelle Badenhausser
1. Trait-based approaches represent a promising way to understand how trophic interactions shape animal communities. The approach relies on the identification of the traits that mediate the linkages between adjacent trophic levels, i.e. “trait-matching”. Yet, how trait-matching explains the abundance and diversity of animal communities has been barely explored. This question may be particularly critical in the context of land use intensification, currently threatening biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. 2. We collected a large dataset...

Data from: Evolutionary dynamics of the leaf phenological cycle in an oak metapopulation along an elevation gradient

Cyril Firmat, Sylvain Delzon, Jean-Marc Louvet, Julien Parmentier, Antoine Kremer & J.-M. Louvet
It has been predicted that environmental changes will radically alter the selective pressures on phenological traits. Long-lived species, such as trees, will be particularly affected, as they may need to undergo major adaptive change over only one or a few generations. The traits describing the annual life cycle of trees are generally highly evolvable, but nothing is known about the strength of their genetic correlations. Tight correlations can impose strong evolutionary constraints, potentially hampering the...

Data from: The shepherds' tale: a genome-wide study across 9 dog breeds implicates two loci in the regulation of fructosamine serum concentration in Belgian shepherds

Simon K. G. Forsberg, Marcin Kierczak, Ingrid Ljungvall, Anne-Christine Merveille, Vassiliki Gouni, Maria Wiberg, Jakob Lundgren Willesen, Sofia Hanås, Anne-Sophie Lequarré, Louise Mejer Sørensen, Laurent Tiret, Kathleen McEntee, Eija Seppälä, Jørgen Koch, Géraldine Battaille, Hannes Lohi, Merete Fredholm, Valerie Chetboul, Jens Häggström, Örjan Carlborg, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh & Katja Höglund
Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem in both dogs and humans. Certain dog breeds show high prevalence of the disease, whereas other breeds are at low risk. Fructosamine and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) are two major biomarkers of glycaemia where serum concentrations reflect glucose turnover over the past few weeks to months. In this study, we searched for genetic factors influencing variation in serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs using data from nine dog breeds....

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure influences dispersal and genetic structure: empirical evidence from a grasshopper in an agricultural landscape

Bertrand Gauffre, Sophie Mallez, Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Leblois Raphael, Isabelle Litrico, Sabrina Delaunay, Isabelle Badenhausser & Raphael Leblois
Dispersal may be strongly influenced by landscape and habitat characteristics that could either enhance or restrict movements of organisms. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure could influence gene flow and the spatial structure of populations. In the past decades, agricultural intensification has led to the reduction in grassland surfaces, their fragmentation and intensification. As these changes are not homogeneously distributed in landscapes, they have resulted in spatial heterogeneity with generally less intensified hedged farmland areas...

Data from: Forest plant community as a driver of soil biodiversity: experimental evidence from collembolan assemblages through large-scale and long-term removal of oak canopy trees Quercus petraea

Ludovic Henneron, Michaël Aubert, Fréderic Archaux, Fabrice Bureau, Yann Dumas, François Ningre, Claudine Richter, Philippe Balandier & Matthieu Chauvat
Plant–soil interactions are increasingly recognized to play a major role in terrestrial ecosystems functioning. However, few studies to date have focused on slow dynamic ecosystems such as forests. As they are vertically stratified by multiple vegetation strata, canopy tree removal by thinning operations could alter forest plant community through tree canopy opening. Very little is known about cascading effects on soil biodiversity. We conducted a large-scale, multi-site assessment of collembolan assemblage response to long-term canopy...

Pedigree-free quantitative genetic approach provides evidence for heritability of movement tactics in wild roe deer

Laura Gervais, Aidan.J Mark Hewison, Nicolas Morellet, Maria Bernard, Joël Merlet, Bruno Cargnelutti, Yannick Chaval, Benoit Pujol & Erwan QUEMERE
Assessing the evolutionary potential of animal populations in the wild is crucial to understanding how they may respond to selection mediated by rapid environmental change (e.g. habitat loss and fragmentation). A growing number of studies have investigated the adaptive role of behaviour, but assessments of its genetic basis in a natural setting remain scarce. We combined intensive biologging technology with genome-wide data and a pedigree-free quantitative genetic approach to quantify repeatability, heritability and evolvability for...

Data from: Climate-warming alters the structure of farmland tri-trophic ecological networks and reduces crop yield

Stephane A. P. Derocles, David H. Lunt, Sophie C. F. Berthe, Paul C. Nichols, Ellen D. Moss & Darren M. Evans
It is unclear how sustained increases in temperature and changes in precipitation, as a result of climate-change, will affect crops and their interactions with agricultural weeds, insect pests and predators, due to the difficulties in quantifying changes in such complex relationships. We simulated the combined effects of increasing temperature (by 1.4°C over a growing season) and applying additional rainwater (10% extra per week) using a replicated, randomized block experiment within a wheat crop. We examined...

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