37 Works

Data from: Host specialization involving attraction, avoidance and performance, in two phytophagous moth species

Marion Orsucci, Philippe Audiot, Alexandra Pommier, Christophe Raynaud, Béatrice Ramora, Anne Zanetto, Denis Bourguet & Réjane Streiff
Host specialization plays a key role in the extreme diversification of phytophagous insects. Whereas proximate mechanisms of specialization have been studied extensively, their consequences for species divergence remain unclear. Preference for, and performance on hosts are thought to be a major source of divergence in phytophagous insects. We assessed these major components of specialization in two moth species, the European corn borer (ECB) and the Adzuki bean borer (ABB), by testing their oviposition behaviour in...

Data from: Colonization of the Mediterranean Basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story

Stephanie Jacquet, Claire Garros, Eric Lombaert, Catherine Walton, Johana Restrepo, Xavier Allene, Thierry Baldet, Catherine Cetre-Sossah, Alexandra Chaskopoulou, Jean-Claude Delecolle, Amelie Desvars, Mouloud Djerbal, Moussa Fall, Laetitia Gardes, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky, Maria Goffredo, Yuval Gottlieb, Assane Gueye Fall, Muo Kasina, Karien Labuschagne, Youssef Lhor, Javier Lucientes, Thibaud Martin, Bruno Mathieu, Miguel Miranda … & J.-C. Delecolle
Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in...

Data from: Forest management adaptation to climate change: a Cornelian dilemma between drought resistance and soil macro-detritivore functional diversity

Ludovic Henneron, Michaël Aubert, Fabrice Bureau, Yann Dumas, François Ningre, Sandrine Perret, Claudine Richter, Philippe Balandier & Matthieu Chauvat
1. Global warming induces new constraints on forest ecosystems and requires forest management adaptation. The reduction in stand density is currently debated as a potential tool to face increasing summer drought risk by improving forest resistance to climate change-induced tree mortality. However, few studies have yet assessed the impacts of this management change on soil biodiversity. 2. We conducted a large-scale, multi-site assessment of the response of soil macro-detritivore assemblages and soil functioning to experimental...

Data from: Automixis in Artemia: solving a century-old controversy

Odrade Nougué, Nicolas O. Rode, Roula Zahab, Adeline Ségard, Luis-Miguel Chevin, Christoph R. Haag, Thomas Lenormand & R. Jabbour-Zahab
Parthenogenesis (reproduction through unfertilized eggs) encompasses a variety of reproduction modes with (automixis) or without (apomixis) meiosis. Different modes of automixis have very different genetic and evolutionary consequences but can be particularly difficult to tease apart. In this paper, we propose a new method to discriminate different types of automixis from population-level genetic data. We apply this method to diploid Artemia parthenogenetica, a crustacean whose reproductive mode remains controversial despite a century of intensive cytogenetic...

Data from: Are generalist Aphidiinae (Hym. Braconidae) mostly cryptic species complexes?

Stéphane A. P. Derocles, Manuel Plantegenest, Jean-Yves Rasplus, Alexia Marie, Darren M. Evans, David H. Lunt & Anne Le Ralec
Aphidiinae are mostly composed of specialist parasitoids and the few species described as generalist are suspected to be composed of cryptic specialists, almost indistinguishable based on morphological characteristics. The use of molecular markers has proven to be a useful tool for revealing cryptic species complexes and here we use seven mitochondrial and nuclear gene fragments to study possible genetic differentiation among seven Aphidiinae generalists. Maximum likelihood (ML) trees and Bayesian Poisson tree processes (bPTP) models...

Data from: Is there still a French eating model? A taxonomy of eating behaviors in adults living in the Paris metropolitan area in 2010

Julien Riou, Thomas Lefevre, Isabelle Parizot, Anne Lhuissier & Pierre Chauvin
Background: Meal times in France still represent an important moment in everyday life. The model of three rigorously synchronized meals is still followed by a majority of people, while meal frequencies have flattened in other European or North-American countries. We aimed to examine the “French model” of eating behavior by identifying and characterizing distinct meal patterns. Methods: Analyses were based on data from the SIRS cohort, a representative survey of the adult population in the...

Data from: Distribution and population structure of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum silenes-acaulis parasitizing an arctic-alpine plant

Britta Bueker, Chris Eberlein, Pierre Gladieux, Angela Schaefer, Alodie Snirc, Dominic Bennett, Dominik Begerow, Michael Hood, Tatiana Giraud & Dominic J. Bennett
Cold-adapted organisms with current arctic-alpine distributions have persisted during the last glaciation in multiple ice-free refugia, leaving footprints in their population structure that contrast with temperate plants and animals. However, pathogens that live within hosts having arctic-alpine distributions have been little studied. Here, we therefore investigated the geographical range and population structure of a fungus parasitizing an arctic-alpine plant. A total of 1437 herbarium specimens of the plant Silene acaulis were examined, and the anther...

Data from: How much would it cost to monitor farmland biodiversity in Europe?

Ilse R. Geijzendorffer, Stefano Targetti, Manuel K. Schneider, Dick J. Brus, Philippe Jeanneret, Robert H. G. Jongman, Martin Knotters, Davide Viaggi, Siyka Angelova, Michaela Arndorfer, Debra Bailey, Katalin Balzacs, András Báldim, Marion M. B. Bogers, Robert G.H. Bunce, Jean-Philippe Choisis, Peter Dennis, Sebastian Eiter, Wendy Fjellstad, Jürgen F. Friedel, Tiziano Gomiero, Arjan Griffioen, Max Kainz, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Gisela Lüscher … & András Báldi
To evaluate progress on political biodiversity objectives, biodiversity monitoring provides information on whether intended results are being achieved. Despite scientific proof that monitoring and evaluation increase the (cost) efficiency of policy measures, cost estimates for monitoring schemes are seldom available, hampering their inclusion in policy programme budgets. Empirical data collected from 12 case studies across Europe were used in a power analysis to estimate the number of farms that would need to be sampled per...

Data from: Single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery and validation in high-density SNP array for genetic analysis in European white oaks

Camille Lepoittevin, Catherine Bodénès, Emilie Chancerel, Laure Villate, Tiange Lang, Isabelle Lesur, Christophe Boury, François Ehrenmann, Diana Zelenika, Anne Boland, Céline Besse, Pauline Garnier-Géré, Christophe Plomion & Antoine Kremer
An Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array was constructed for European white oaks. Six individuals of Quercus petraea and Q. robur were considered for SNP discovery using both previously obtained Sanger sequences across 676 gene regions (1371 in vitro SNPs) and Roche 454 technology sequences from 5112 contigs (6542 putative in silico SNPs). The 7913 SNPs were genotyped across the six parental individuals, full-sib progenies (one within each species and two interspecific crosses between Q. petraea...

Data from: Varroa destructor changes cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic its new host.

Zachary Y. Huang, Yves Le Conte, Jean-Philippe Christidès, Zhi Jiang Zeng, Maurice Roux & Anne-Genevieve Bagnères
Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular...

Data from: \"Transcriptomic resources for Hazelnut tree (Corylus avellana L.)\" in Genomic Resources Notes Accepted 1 August 2015 to 31 September 2015

Isabelle Lesur, Annegret Kohler, Francis Martin, Antoine Kremer, Christophe Plomion & Grégoire Le Provost
This article documents the public availability of transcriptome sequence data, assembled contigs, annotated contigs and molecular markers for Hazelnut tree (Corylus avellana).

Data from: The shepherds' tale: a genome-wide study across 9 dog breeds implicates two loci in the regulation of fructosamine serum concentration in Belgian shepherds

Simon K. G. Forsberg, Marcin Kierczak, Ingrid Ljungvall, Anne-Christine Merveille, Vassiliki Gouni, Maria Wiberg, Jakob Lundgren Willesen, Sofia Hanås, Anne-Sophie Lequarré, Louise Mejer Sørensen, Laurent Tiret, Kathleen McEntee, Eija Seppälä, Jørgen Koch, Géraldine Battaille, Hannes Lohi, Merete Fredholm, Valerie Chetboul, Jens Häggström, Örjan Carlborg, Kerstin Lindblad-Toh & Katja Höglund
Diabetes mellitus is a serious health problem in both dogs and humans. Certain dog breeds show high prevalence of the disease, whereas other breeds are at low risk. Fructosamine and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) are two major biomarkers of glycaemia where serum concentrations reflect glucose turnover over the past few weeks to months. In this study, we searched for genetic factors influencing variation in serum fructosamine concentration in healthy dogs using data from nine dog breeds....

Data from: Morphological drivers of trophic cascades

Clémentine Renneville, Arnaud Le Rouzic, Michel Baylac, Alexis Millot, Stéphane Loisel & Eric Edeline
Worldwide, local anthropogenic extinctions have recently been reported to induce trophic cascades, defined as perturbations of top consumers that propagate along food chains down to primary producers. This focus on the effects of top-consumer extinction (i.e. of species presence) ignores potential cascading effects of the rapid morphological changes that may precede extinction. Here, we show in an experimental, three-level food chain including medaka fish, herbivorous zooplankton and unicellular algae that varying body length of a...

Data from: Taxonomic and functional composition of arthropod assemblages across contrasting Amazonian forests

P. A. Greg Lamarre, Bruno Hérault, Paul V. A. Fine, Vincent Vedel, Roland Lupoli, Italo Mesones, Christopher Baraloto & Greg P. A. Lamarre
Arthropods represent most of global biodiversity, with the highest diversity found in tropical rainforests. Nevertheless, we have a very incomplete understanding of how tropical arthropod communities are assembled. We conducted a comprehensive mass-sampling of arthropod communities within three major habitat types of lowland Amazonian rainforest, including terra firme clay, white-sand, and seasonally-flooded forests in Peru and French Guiana. We examined how taxonomic and functional composition (at the family level) differed across these habitat types in...

Data from: Recasting the dynamic equilibrium model through a functional lens: the interplay of trait-based community assembly and climate

Jessy Loranger, Cyrille Violle, Bill Shipley, Sandra Lavorel, Anne Bonis, Pablo Cruz, Frédérique Louault, Grégory Loucougaray, François Mesléard, Nicole Yavercovski & Éric Garnier
1. According to the dynamic equilibrium hypothesis (DEH), plant species richness is locally controlled by productivity and disturbance. Given that regional conditions widely affect local environmental variables such as soil nutrient availability, the DEH predictions could be improved by considering how climate influences local controls of species richness. Further, a trait-based approach to community assembly has the potential to reveal a deeper, mechanistic understanding of species richness variation across environments. Here we bring together DEH...

Data from: Evidence of divergent selection for drought and cold tolerance at landscape and local scales in Abies alba Mill. in the French Mediterranean Alps

Anna M. Roschanski, Katalin Csilléry, Sascha Liepelt, Sylvie Oddou-Muratorio, Birgit Ziegenhagen, Frédéric Huard, Kristian K. Ullrich, Dragos Postolache, Giovanni G. Vendramin & Bruno Fady
Understanding local adaptation in forest trees is currently a key research and societal priority. Geographically and ecologically marginal populations provide ideal case studies, because environmental stress along with reduced gene flow can facilitate the establishment of locally adapted populations. We sampled European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) trees in the French Mediterranean Alps, along the margin of its distribution range, from pairs of high and low elevation plots on four different mountains situated along a...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure influences dispersal and genetic structure: empirical evidence from a grasshopper in an agricultural landscape

Bertrand Gauffre, Sophie Mallez, Marie-Pierre Chapuis, Leblois Raphael, Isabelle Litrico, Sabrina Delaunay, Isabelle Badenhausser & Raphael Leblois
Dispersal may be strongly influenced by landscape and habitat characteristics that could either enhance or restrict movements of organisms. Therefore, spatial heterogeneity in landscape structure could influence gene flow and the spatial structure of populations. In the past decades, agricultural intensification has led to the reduction in grassland surfaces, their fragmentation and intensification. As these changes are not homogeneously distributed in landscapes, they have resulted in spatial heterogeneity with generally less intensified hedged farmland areas...

Data from: The red coral (Corallium rubrum) transcriptome: a new resource for population genetics and local adaptation studies

Marine Pratlong, Anne Haguenauer, Olivier Chabrol, Christophe Klopp, Pierre Pontarotti & Didier Aurelle
The question of species survival and evolution in heterogeneous environments has long been a subject for study. Indeed, it is often difficult to identify the molecular basis of adaptation to contrasted environments, and nongenetic effects increase the difficulty to disentangle fixed effects, such as genetic adaptation, from variable effects, such as individual phenotypic plasticity, in adaptation. Nevertheless, this question is also of great importance for understanding the evolution of species in a context of climate...

Data from: Within-range translocations and their consequences in European larch

Stefanie Wagner, Sascha Liepelt, Sophie Gerber & Rémy J. Petit
In contrast to biological invasions, translocations of individuals within a species range are understudied, due to difficulties in systematically detecting them. This results in limited knowledge about the corresponding processes and uncertainties regarding the status of extant populations. European larch, a forest tree whose fragmented native distribution is restricted to the Alps and to other Central European mountains, has been massively planted for at least 300 years. Here we focus on the genetic characterization of...

Data from: Heterozygote advantage at MHC DRB may influence response to infectious disease epizootics

Amy J. Osborne, John Pearson, Sandra S. Negro, B. Louise Chilvers, Martin A. Kennedy & Neil J. Gemmell
The effect of MHC polymorphism on individual fitness variation in the wild remains equivocal; however, much evidence suggests that heterozygote advantage is a major determinant. To understand the contribution of MHC polymorphism to individual disease resistance or susceptibility in natural populations, we investigated two MHC class II B loci, DQB and DRB, in the New Zealand sea lion (NZSL, Phocarctos hookeri). The NZSL is a threatened species which is unusually susceptible to death by bacterial...

Data from: Escape of spring frost and disease through phenological variations in oak populations along elevation gradients

Cécile Françoise Dantec, Hugo Ducasse, Xavier Capdevielle, Olivier Fabreguettes, Sylvain Delzon & Marie-Laure Desprez-Loustau
1. The timing of tree flushing follows strong phenotypic and genetic clines across environmental gradients. It may be seen as an adaptive response to abiotic (escape of spring frost and maximizing growing season length) and biotic (escape of pest and disease) hazards. However, few studies have investigated jointly both types of hazards. 2. We assessed exposure to both abiotic (spring frost) and biotic (powdery mildew) hazards within and between sessile oak populations along elevation gradients,...

Data from: Low reproductive isolation and highly variable levels of gene flow reveal limited progress toward speciation between European river and brook lampreys

Quentin Rougemont, Arnaud Gaigher, Emilien Lasne, Jessica Côte, Maïra Coke, Anne-Laure Besnard, Sophie Launey & Guillaume Evanno
Ecologically based divergent selection is a factor that could drive reproductive isolation even in the presence of gene flow. Population pairs arrayed along a continuum of divergence provide a good opportunity to address this issue. Here we used a combination of mating trials, experimental crosses and population genetics analyses to investigate the evolution of reproductive isolation between two closely related species of lampreys with distinct life histories. We used microsatellite markers to genotype over 1000...

Data from: Costs of CRISPR-Cas mediated resistance in Streptococcus thermophilus

Pedro F. Vale, Guillaume Lafforgue, François Gatchitch, Rozenn Gardan, Sylvain Moineau & Sylvain Gandon
CRISPR-Cas is a form of adaptive sequence-specific immunity in microbes. This system offers unique opportunities for the study of coevolution between bacteria and their viral pathogens, bacteriophages. A full understanding of the coevolutionary dynamics of CRISPR-Cas requires knowing the magnitude of the cost of resisting infection. Here, using the gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus and its associated virulent phage 2972, a well-established model system harbouring at least two type II functional CRISPR-Cas systems, we obtained different...

Data from: High genetic variation in resting stage production in a metapopulation: is there evidence for local adaptation?

Anne Carole Roulin, Mahendra Mariadassou, Matthew D. Hall, Jean-Claude Walser, Christoph Haag & Dieter Ebert
Local adaptation is a key process for the maintenance of genetic diversity and population diversification. A better understanding of the mechanisms that allow (or prevent) local adaptation constitutes a key in apprehending how and at what spatial scale it occurs. The production of resting stages is found in many taxa and reflects an adaptation to outlast adverse environmental conditions. Daphnia magna (Crustacea) can alternate between asexual and sexual reproduction, the latter being linked to dormancy,...

Data from: A comparison between transcriptome sequencing and 16S metagenomics for detection of bacterial pathogens in wildlife

Maria Razzauti, Maxime Galan, Maria Bernard, Sarah Maman, Christophe Klopp, Nathalie Charbonnel, Muriel Vayssier-Taussat, Marc Eloit & Jean-François Cosson
Background: Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    37

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    37

Affiliations

  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    37
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    16
  • University of Bordeaux
    5
  • University of Toulouse
    3
  • Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement
    3
  • University of Liège
    2
  • Institute of Biosciences and Bioresources
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • McGill University
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2