41 Works

Data from: The genetic architecture of plant defense tradeoffs in a common monkeyflower

Nicholas Kooyers, Benjamin Blackman, Abigail Donofrio & Liza Holeski
Determining how adaptive combinations of traits arose requires understanding the prevalence and scope of genetic constraints. Frequently observed phenotypic correlations between plant growth, defenses, and/or reproductive timing have led researchers to suggest that pleiotropy or strong genetic linkage between variants affecting independent traits is pervasive. Alternatively, these correlations could arise via independent mutations in different genes for each trait and extensive correlational selection. Here we evaluate these alternatives by conducting a QTL mapping experiment involving...

Data from: Botany is the root and the future of invasion biology

Nicholas Kooyers, Brittany Sutherland, Craig Barrett, James Beck, Michael McKain, Maribeth Latvis & Erin Sigel
This dataset was used to create Figure 1 within the linked On the Nature of Things article. The article describes how botanists have historically contributed to the field of invasion biology and why botanists should be an important contributor in the coming years. To make this point, we compared the relative frequencies of google ngrams containing the words 'invasive species', 'invasive plants', or the sum of frequencies from several different animal taxa including: ‘invasive insects’,...

Data from: Genetic divergence between two phenotypically distinct bottlenose dolphin ecotypes suggests separate evolutionary trajectories

Pedro F. Fruet, Eduardo R. Secchi, Juliana C. Di Tullio, Paulo C. Simões-Lopes, Fábio Daura-Jorge, Ana Paula B. Costa, Els Vermeulen, Paulo André C. Flores, Rodrigo C. Genoves, Paula Laporta, Luciano B. Beheregaray & Luciana M. Möller
Due to their worldwide distribution and occupancy of different types of environments, bottlenose dolphins display considerable morphological variation. Despite limited understanding about the taxonomic identity of such forms and connectivity among them at global scale, coastal (or inshore) and offshore (or oceanic) ecotypes have been widely recognized in several ocean regions. In the Southwest Atlantic Ocean (SWA), however, there are scarce records of bottlenose dolphins differing in external morphology according to habitat preferences that resemble...

Data from: How far is too close? Restricted, sex-biased dispersal in black-capped vireos

Giri Athrey, Richard F. Lance & Paul L. Leberg
Understanding the interplay of dispersal and how it translates into gene flow is key to understanding population processes, and especially so for endangered species occupying fragmented habitats. In migratory songbirds, there is evidence that long-distance movement capabilities are not highly related to observed dispersal. Our objectives were to 1) define the fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the endangered black-capped vireos to shed light on dispersal patterns, and 2) to relate dispersal dynamics to overall population...

Data from: Coordinated dispersal and pre-Isthmian assembly of the Central American ichthyofauna

Victor A. Tagliacollo, Scott M. Duke-Sylvester, Wilfredo A. Matamoros, Prosanta Chakrabarty & James S. Albert
We document patterns of coordinated dispersal over evolutionary time frames in heroine cichlids and poeciliine live-bearers, the two most species-rich clades of freshwater fishes in the Caribbean basin. Observed dispersal rate (DO) values were estimated from time-calibrated molecular phylogenies in Lagrange+, a modified version of the ML-based parametric biogeographic program Lagrange. DO is measured in units of ‘wallaces’ (wa) as the number of biogeographic range-expansion events per million years. DO estimates were generated on a...

Energetic constraints on body-size niches in a resource-limited marine environment

Sara River Bryant & Craig McClain
Body size of life on Earth spans many orders of magnitude, and with it scales the energetic requirements of organisms. Thus, changes in environmental energy should impact community body-size distributions in predictable ways by reshaping ecological and niche dynamics. We examine how carbon, oxygen, and temperature, three energetic drivers, impact community size-based assembly in deep-sea bivalves. We demonstrate that body-size distributions are influenced by multiple energetic constraints. Relaxation in these constraints leads to an expansion...

Data from: Biogeography of curimatid fishes reveals multiple lowland-upland river transitions and differential diversification in the Neotropics (Teleostei, Curimatidae)

Bruno F. Melo, James S. Albert, Fernando C. P. Dagosta & Victor A. Tagliacollo
The Neotropics harbors a megadiverse ichthyofauna comprising over 6300 species with approximately 80% in just three taxonomic orders within the clade Characiphysi. This highly diverse group has evolved in tropical South America over tens to hundreds of millions of years influenced mostly by re‐arrangements of river drainages in lowland and upland systems. In this study, we investigate patterns of spatial diversification in Neotropical freshwater fishes in the family Curimatidae, a species‐rich clade of the order...

Variation in frequency of plastid RNA editing within Adiantum (Pteridaceae) implies rapid evolution in fern plastomes

Blake Fauskee, Erin Sigel, Kathleen Pryer & Amanda Grusz
Premise Recent advances in studies of plant RNA editing have demonstrated that the number of editing sites can vary widely among large taxonomic groups (orders, families). Yet, very little is known about intrageneric variation in frequency of plant RNA editing, and no study has been conducted in ferns. Methods We determined plastid RNA editing counts for two species of Adiantum (Pteridaceae), A. shastense and A. aleuticum, by implementing a pipeline that integrated read mapping and...

Knifefish turning performance during forward swimming

Olivia Hawkins, Victor Ortega-Jimenez & Christopher Sanford
Rapid turning and swimming contribute to ecologically important behaviors in fishes such as predator avoidance, prey capture, mating, and the navigation of complex environments. For riverine species, such as knifefishes, that are commonly challenged by turbulent flows, turning control may be effective for counteracting adverse locomotive perturbations. Most research on fish maneuvering focuses on fish with traditional fin and body morphologies, which primarily use body bending and the pectoral fins during turning. However, it is...

Caribbean Roseate Tern nest survival and monitoring data

Paige Byerly, Paul Leberg & Susan Zaluski
Determining how site characteristics influence reproductive success can help guide conservation planning for declining wildlife populations. For colonially-breeding seabirds, nest survival and predation risk can be influenced by both colony and nest site characteristics such as colony size, nest density, and nest location. We evaluated reproductive success of a declining population of Roseate Terns (Sterna dougallii) in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands to identify primary causes of nest failure and investigate the influence of...

How much do rare and crop-pollinating bees overlap in identity and flower preferences?

Molly MacLeod, James Reilly, Daniel Cariveau, Mark Genung, Michael Roswell, Jason Gibbs & Rachael Winfree
1. The biodiversity-centered approach to conservation prioritizes rare species, whereas the ecosystem services approach prioritizes species that provide services to people. The two approaches align when rare species provide ecosystem services, or when both groups of species benefit from the same management action. We use data on bee pollinators and the plant species they forage on to determine if there are rare species among the most important crop pollinators, and the extent to which plant...

Data from: Neutral genetic processes influence MHC evolution in threatened gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus)

Jean P. Elbers, Rachel W. Clostio & Sabrina S. Taylor
Levels of adaptive genetic variation influence how species deal with environmental and ecological change, but these levels are frequently inferred using neutral genetic markers. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a key role in the adaptive branch of the immune system and have been used extensively to estimate levels of adaptive genetic variation. Parts of the peptide binding region, sites where MHC molecules directly interact with pathogen and self-proteins, were sequenced from a MHC class...

Data from: Condition-dependent foraging strategies in a coastal seabird: evidence that the rich get richer

Brock Geary, Scott T. Walter, Paul L. Leberg & Jordan Karubian
The degree to which foraging individuals are able to appropriately modify their behaviors in response to dynamic environmental conditions and associated resource availability can have important fitness consequences. Despite an increasingly refined understanding of differences in foraging behavior between individuals, we still lack detailed characterizations of within-individual variation over space and time, and what factors may drive this variability. From 2014-2017, we used GPS transmitters and accelerometers to document foraging movements by breeding adult Brown...

Data from: Homophily around specialized foraging underlies dolphin social preferences

Alexandre Marcel S. Machado, Maurício Cantor, Ana Paula B. Costa, Barbara P. H. Righetti, Carolina Bezamat, João V. S. Valle-Pereira, Paulo C. Simões-Lopes, Pedro V. Castilho & Fábio G. Daura-Jorge
Individuals often associate socially with those who behave the same way. This principle, homophily, could structure populations into distinct social groups. We tested this hypothesis in a bottlenose dolphin population that appeared to be clustered around a specialized foraging tactic involving cooperation with net-casting fishermen, but in which other potential drivers of such social structure have never been assessed. We measured and controlled for the contribution of sex, age, genetic relatedness, home range, and foraging...

Data from: The emergence of the lobsters: phylogenetic relationships, morphological evolution and divergence time comparisons of an ancient group (Decapoda: Achelata, Astacidea, Glypheidea, Polychelida)

Heather D. Bracken-Grissom, Shane T. Ahyong, Richard D. Wilkinson, Rodney M. Felmann, Carrie E. Schweitzer, Jesse W. Breinholt, Matthew Bendall, Ferran Palero, Tin-Yam Chan, Darryl L. Felder, Rafael Robles, Ka-Hou Chu, Ling-Ming Tsang, Dohyup Kim, Joel W. Martin, Keith A. Crandall & Rodney M. Feldmann
Lobsters are a ubiquitous and economically important group of decapod crustaceans that includes the infraorders Polychelida, Glypheidea, Astacidea and Achelata. They include familiar forms such as the spiny, slipper, clawed lobsters and crayfish and unfamiliar forms such as the deep-sea and “living fossil” species. The high degree of morphological diversity among these infraorders has led to a dynamic classification and conflicting hypotheses of evolutionary relationships. In this study, we estimated phylogenetic relationships amongst the major...

Data from: Trophic niche size and overlap decreases with increasing ecosystem productivity

Justin Lesser, William James, Rachel Wilson, Chris Stallings & James Nelson
The production and transfer of biomass through trophic relationships is a core ecosystem function. The movement of energy through the food web is mediated by organisms operating in their niche space. For generalists, the size of this niche space is inherently plastic and changes in response to available food sources. Therefore, this relationship between ecosystem productivity and niche size is an important determinant of ecosystem function. Competing theories about the nature of this relationship predict...

A multi-modal sensor dataset for continuous stress detection of nurses in a hospital

Seyedmajid Hosseini, Satya Katragadda, Ravi Teja Bhupatiraju, Ziad Ashkar, Christoph Borst, Kenneth Cochran & Raju Gottumukkala
Advances in wearable technologies provide the opportunity to monitor many physiological variables continuously. Stress detection has gained increased attention in recent years, especially because early stress detection can help individuals better manage health to minimize the negative impacts of long-term stress exposure. This paper provides a unique stress detection dataset created in a natural working environment in a hospital. This dataset is a collection of biometric data of nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak. Studying stress...

Data from: Species loss drives ecosystem function in experiments, but in nature the importance of species loss depends on dominance

Mark A. Genung, Jeremy Fox & Rachael Winfree
Aim: Decades of experimental research have conclusively shown a positive relationship between species richness and ecosystem function. However, authoritative reviews find no consensus on how species loss affects function in natural communities. We analyse experimental and observational data in an identical way and test whether they produce similar results. Location: North America and Europe (experimental communities); global (natural communities). Time period: Experimental communities: 1998–2013; natural communities: 1982–2018. Major taxa studied: Experimental communities: temperate grassland plants;...

Strength in numbers? Cytotype frequency mediates effect of reproductive barriers in mixed-ploidy arrays.

Brittany Sutherland, Tomas Miranda-Katz & Laura Galloway
When differentiated lineages come into contact, their fates depend on demographic and reproductive factors. These factors have been well-studied in taxa of the same ploidy, but less is known about sympatric lineages that differ in ploidy, particularly with respect to demographic factors. We assessed prezygotic, postzygotic, and total reproductive isolation in naturally-pollinated arrays of diploid-tetraploid and tetraploid-hexaploid population mixes of Campanula rotundifolia by measuring pollinator transitions, seed yield, germination rate, and proportion of hybrid offspring....

Data from: Population genetic inferences using immune gene SNPs mirror patterns inferred by microsatellites

Jean P. Elbers, Rachel W. Clostio & Sabrina S. Taylor
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are replacing microsatellites for population genetic analyses, but it is not apparent how many SNPs are needed or how well SNPs correlate with microsatellites. We used data from the gopher tortoise, Gopherus polyphemus—a species with small populations, to compare SNPs and microsatellites to estimate population genetic parameters. Specifically, we compared one SNP data set (16 tortoises from four populations sequenced at 17 901 SNPs) to two microsatellite data sets, a full...

Data from: Birds in space & time: genetic changes accompanying anthropogenic habitat fragmentation in the endangered black-capped vireo (Vireo atricapilla)

Giridhar Athrey, Kelly R. Barr, Richard F. Lance & Paul L. Leberg
Anthropogenic alterations of the natural environment can be a potent evolutionary force. For species that have specific habitat requirements, habitat loss can result in substantial genetic effects, potentially impeding future adaptability and evolution. The endangered black-capped vireo (Vireo atricapilla) suffered a substantial contraction of breeding habitat and population size during much of the 20th century. In a previous study we reported significant differentiation between remnant populations, but failed to recover a strong genetic signal of...

Data from: Hierarchical population structure and habitat differences in a highly mobile marine species: the Atlantic spotted dolphin

Amelia Viricel & Patricia E. Rosel
Recent molecular studies have shown that highly mobile species with continuous distributions can exhibit fine-scale population structure. In this context, we assessed genetic structure within a marine species with high dispersal potential, the Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis). Using 19 microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region sequences, population structure was investigated in the western North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Azores Islands. Analyses of the microsatellite data identified four distinct genetic clusters, which...

Data from: Inconsistent use of multiple comparison corrections in studies of population genetic structure: are some type I errors more tolerable than others?

Samantha Hauser, Kristin Wakeland & Paul Leberg
Studies of genetic population structure often involve numerous tests of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), linkage disequilibrium (LD), and genetic differentiation. Tests of HWE or LD are important precursors to population structure assessments. When conducting multiple related statistical tests, type 1 error increases, e.g., familywise error rate (FWER) inflation. FWER inflation can alter the results of statistical tests and thus the conclusions. Authors are aware of the need to control for FWER inflation, but there has been...

Regional Invasive Species & Climate Change Management Challenge: Gardening with climate-smart native plants in the Northeast

Bethany A. Bradley, Amanda Bayer, Bridget Griffin, Sydni Joubran, Brittany B. Laginhas, Lara Munro, Sam Talbot, Jenica M. Allen, Audrey Barker-Plotkin, Evelyn M. Beaury, Carrie Brown-Lima, Emily J. Fusco, Hayley Mount, Bailey Servais & Toni Lyn Morelli
An estimated 80% of ornamental plants for sale are non-native. This means that the average yard does a poor job of supporting native flora and fauna. By shifting our plantings towards natives, we can dramatically increase the diversity of bees, butterflies, birds and other animals. In contrast, non-native plants do not support local food webs and can become invasive. Native plants increase biodiversity and reduce risks associated with invasive species, which supports resilient ecosystems in...

Data from: A metabarcoding framework for facilitated survey of endolithic phototrophs with tufA

Thomas Sauvage, William E. Schmidt, Schoichiro Suda & Suzanne Fredericq
Background: In spite of their ecological importance as primary producers and microbioeroders of marine calcium carbonate (CaCO3) substrata, endolithic phototrophs spanning both prokaryotic (the cyanobacteria) and eukaryotic algae lack established molecular resources for their facilitated survey with high throughput sequencing. Here, the development of a metabarcoding framework for the elongation factor EF-Ttu (tufA) was tested on four Illumina-sequenced marine CaCO3 microfloras for the characterization of their endolithic phototrophs, especially the abundant bioeroding Ostreobium spp. (Ulvophyceae)....

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