85 Works

Data from: Environmental gradients and the evolution of successional habitat specialization: a test case with 14 Neotropical forest sites

Susan G. Letcher, Jesse R. Lasky, Robin L. Chazdon, Natalia Norden, S. Joseph Wright, Jorge A. Meave, Eduardo A. Pérez-García, Rodrigo Muñoz, Eunice Romero-Pérez, Ana Andrade, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Tony V. Bentos, Radika Bhaskar, Frans Bongers, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Ricardo G. César, Deborah A. Clark, David B. Clark, Dylan Craven, Alexander DeFrancesco, Juan M. Dupuy, Bryan Finegan … & G. Bruce Williamson
1. Successional gradients are ubiquitous in nature, yet few studies have systematically examined the evolutionary origins of taxa that specialize at different successional stages. Here we quantify successional habitat specialization in Neotropical forest trees and evaluate its evolutionary lability along a precipitation gradient. Theoretically, successional habitat specialization should be more evolutionarily conserved in wet forests than in dry forests due to more extreme microenvironmental differentiation between early and late successional stages in wet forest. 2....

Data from: Human management and hybridization shape treegourd fruits in the Brazilian Amazon Basin

Priscila Ambrosio Moreira, Cédric Mariac, Leila Zekraoui, Marie Couderc, Doriane Picanco Rodrigues, Charles R. Clement & Yves Vigouroux
Local people's perceptions of cultivated and wild agrobiodiversity, as well as their management of hybridization are still understudied in Amazonia. Here we analyze domesticated treegourd (Crescentia cujete), whose versatile fruits have technological, symbolic and medicinal uses. A wild relative (C. amazonica) of the cultivated species grows spontaneously in Amazonian flooded forests. We demonstrated, using whole chloroplast sequences and nuclear microsatellites, that the two species are strongly differentiated. Nonetheless, they hybridize readily throughout Amazonia and the...

Data from: Historical demography and climate driven distributional changes in a widespread Neotropical freshwater species with high economic importance

Manolo Perez, Ezequiel Oliveira, Luiz Bertollo, Carla Gestich, Petr Rab, Tariq Ezaz, Fernando Souza, Patrik Viana, Eliana Feldberg, Edivaldo Herculano Correa De Oliveira & Marcelo Cioffi
The Neotropical region exhibits the greatest worldwide diversity and the diversification history of several clades is related to the puzzling geomorphologic and climatic history of this region. The freshwater Amazon ecoregion contains the main hydrographic basins of the Neotropical region that are highly dendritic and ecologically diverse. It contains a rich and endemic fish fauna, including one of its most iconic and economically important representatives, the bony-tongue Arapaima gigas (Teleostei, Osteoglossiformes). Here, we evaluated the...

Palms and trees resist extreme drought in Amazon forests with shallow water tables

Thaiane Sousa, Juliana Schietti, Fernanda Coelho De Souza, Adriane Esquivel-Muelbert, Igor Ribeiro, Thaise Emilio, Pedro Pequeno, Oliver Phillips & Flavia Costa
1. The intensity and frequency of severe droughts in the Amazon region has increase in recent decades. These extreme events are associated with changes in forest dynamics, biomass and floristic composition. However, most studies of drought response have focused on upland forests with deep water tables, which may be especially sensitive to drought. Palms, which tend to dominate the less well-drained soils, have also been neglected. The relative neglect of shallow water tables and palms...

Data from: Predicted 2100 climate scenarios affects growth and skeletal development of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) larvae

Ivã G. Lopes, Thyssia B. Araújo-Dairiki, Juliana T. Kojima, Adalberto L. Val & Maria C. Portella
Climate changes driven by greenhouse gas emissions have been occurring in an accelerated degree, affecting environmental dynamics and living beings. Among all affected biomes, the Amazon is particularly subjected to adverse impacts, such as temperature rises and water acidification. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of predicted climate change on initial growth and development of an important Amazonian food fish, the tambaqui. We analyzed growth performance, and monitored the initial osteogenic process and the...

Data from: Long-term change in the avifauna of undisturbed Amazonian rainforest: Ground-foraging birds disappear and the baseline shifts

Cameron Rutt, Philip Stouffer, Vitek Jirinec, Richard Bierregaard, Angélica Hernández-Palma, Erik Johnson, Stephen Midway, Luke Powell, Jared Wolfe & Thomas Lovejoy
How are rainforest birds faring in the Anthropocene? We use bird captures spanning >35 years from 55 sites within a vast area of intact Amazonian rainforest to reveal reduced abundance of terrestrial and near-ground insectivores in the absence of deforestation, edge effects, or other direct anthropogenic landscape change. Because undisturbed forest includes far fewer terrestrial and near-ground insectivores than it did historically, today’s fragments and second growth are more impoverished than shown by comparisons with...

Notes on Fomitiporia Murrill in Amazon region: a list of species and new references

Maria Silva, Ceci Campos, Maria Aparecida De Jesus & Rafaela Pires
Twenty-three specimens of fungi of genus Fomitiporia Murrill, collected in the Amazonian region in the states of Amazonas and Roraima in their respective rainy periods were analyzed. The present study has both resulted in the description of eight species, namely F. apiahyna s. l. (Speg.) Robledo, Decock & Rajchenb., F. calkinsii (Murrill) Vlasák & Kout, F. conyana Alves-Silva & Drechsler-Santos, F. impercepta Morera, Robledo&Urcelay, F. langloisii Murrill, F. maxonii Murrill, F. murrillii Alves-Silva, R.M. Silveira...

A worldwide assessment of soil macroinvertebrate communities

Patrick Lavelle, Jerome Mathieu, Alister Spain, George Brown, Carlos Fragoso, Emmanuel Lapied, Adriana De Aquino, Isabelle Barois, Edmundo Barrios, Eleusa Barros, Juan Camilo Bedano, Eric Blanchart, Mark Caulfield, Yamileth Chagueza, Jun Dai, Thibaud Decaens, Anahi Domninquez, Yamileth Dominquez, Alex Feijoo, Patricia Folgaraiti, Steven Fonte, Norma Gorosito, Esperanza Huerta, Juan Jose Jimenez, Courtland Kelly … & Cesar Botero
Soil macroinvertebrate communities have been assessed worldwide using the standard ISO/TSBF sampling procedure. The Macrofauna database currently comprises 3694 sites distributed throughout 41 countries, from 55º S latitude to 57ºN, sea level to over 4000m in elevation, in total annual total rainfall regimes between 500 and >3000mm and 5 to 32ºC mean temperature. These communities are significantly influenced by climatic parameters, soil texture and vegetation cover. Abundance and diversity were highest in tropical rain forests...

Data from: Effects of a major Amazonian river confluence on the distribution of floodplain forest avifauna

Thiago Laranjeiras, Luciano Naka, Gabriel Leite & Mario Cohn-Haft
Aim: Although “river color” or water type is an important determinant of Amazonian floodplain biodiversity, the relevance of mixing distinct water types at river confluences to the distribution of terrestrial floodplain fauna has been largely overlooked. We investigated how the influx of a sediment-rich whitewater tributary affects the floodplain forest avifauna along the world’s largest blackwater river. Location: Northwestern Brazilian Amazon Taxon: Birds Methods: We sampled floodplain avifauna and retrieved estimates of sediment concentration in...

Recent population differentiation in the habitat specialist Glossy Antshrike (Aves: Thamnophilidae) across Amazonian seasonally flooded forests: Complete matrix

Sofia Silva, Camila Ribas & Alexandre Aleixo
We assessed population structure and the spatio-temporal pattern of diversification in the Glossy Antshrike Sakesphorus luctuosus (Aves, Thamnophilidae) to understand the processes shaping the evolutionary history of Amazonian floodplains and address unresolved taxonomic controversies surrounding its species limits. By targeting ultraconserved elements (UCEs) from 32 specimens of S. luctuosus, we identified independent lineages and estimated their differentiation, divergence times and migration rates. We also estimated current and past demographic histories for each recovered lineage. We...

Dancing drives evolution of sexual size dimorphism in manakins

Elsie H. Shogren, Marina Anciães, Julia Barske, César Cestari, Emily H. DuVal, Milene G. Gaiotti, Erik I. Johnson, Rebecca T. Kimball, Miguel A. Marini, T. Brandt Ryder, Micah N. Scholer, Judit Ungvári, Stewart A. White & W. Alice Boyle
Body size mediates life history, physiology, and inter- and intra-specific interactions. Within species, sexes frequently differ in size, reflecting divergent selective pressures and/or constraints. Both sexual selection and differences in environmentally-mediated reproductive constraints can drive sexual size dimorphism, but empirically testing causes of dimorphism is challenging. Manakins (Pipridae), a family of Neotropical birds comprising ~50 species, exhibit both male- and female-biased size dimorphism and are distributed across gradients of precipitation and elevation. Males perform courtship...

Island size predicts mammal diversity in insular environments, except for land-bridge islands

Gilson De Souza Ferreira Neto
Insular environments are among the most endangered ecosystems as they face a myriad of anthropogenic stressors. Forest mammals perform a wide range of ecological services, with their persistence being vital for ecosystem functionality in both natural and artificial islands. Studies revealed that shrinkage in island size usually leads to the decay of mammal species richness and abundance in patchy landscapes. However, mammal species-area (SARs) and abundance-area (AARs) relationships can differ among insular environments: oceanic, fluvial,...

Data from: \"Transcriptome sequences for Campanula gentilis\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 April 2015 – 31 May 2015

Töre Demet, Federico Luebert, Guilhem Mansion, Ludo A. H. Muller, M. Vidotto, E. Boscari, L. Congiu, A. Grapputo, L. Zane, Vera Maria Fonseca Almeida-Val, Maria Manuela Coelho, Tiago Filipe Jesus & Demet Töre
In this report, we present the transcriptome of a single accession of Campanula gentilis Kovanda, obtained through the sequencing of both a normalized and a non-normalized cDNA library generated from stem and leaf tissue. The resources we provide include the raw sequence reads, the assembled contigs, the putative open reading frames, the contig/ORF annotations and the normalized as well as non-normalized expression levels.

Data from: Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages

Rafael P. Leitão, Jansen Zuanon, Sebastien Villeger, Stephen E. Williams, Christopher Baraloto, Claire Fortunel, Fernando P. Mendonça & David Mouillot
There is broad consensus that the diversity of functional traits within species assemblages drives several ecological processes. It is also widely recognized that rare species are the first to go extinct following human-induced disturbances. Surprisingly, however, the functional importance of rare species is still poorly understood, particularly in tropical species-rich assemblages where the majority of species are rare and the rate of species extinction can be high. Here we investigated the consequences of local and...

Data from: Edaphic factors determining the occurrence of herbaceous legumes in Amazonian savannas

Claymir De Oliveira Cavalcante, Andréia Silva Flores & Reinaldo Imbrozio Barbosa
Edaphic factors have been indicated as a determinant of the distribution of plant communities in Amazonia. The aim of this study was to detect which edaphic factors determine the occurrence of herbaceous legumes in Amazonian savannas. Therefore, an inventory of herbaceous flora of the family Leguminosae was conducted in 34 permanent plots established in two savanna areas of Roraima, northern Brazilian Amazon. The importance value index was higher for Chamaecrista desvauxii (24.9%), Aeschynomene hystrix (15.7%)...

Data from: Effect of distance to edge and edge interaction on seedling regeneration and biotic damage in tropical rainforest fragments: a long‐term experiment

Julieta Benítez-Malvido, Amparo Lazaro & Isolde D. K. Ferraz
In forest fragments, edge effects can influence forest regeneration, but little is known about how edge effects influence seedling performance and the interaction between seedlings and their natural enemies over time. In central Amazonia, we recorded survival and growth (in height and leaf number) and damage by insect herbivores and leaf‐fungal pathogens of Chrysophyllum pomiferum (Sapotaceae) seedlings that were exposed to different numbers of edges and to different distances from the forest edge. Grown seedlings...

Data from: Habitat amount hypothesis and passive sampling explain mammal species composition in Amazonian river islands

Rafael M. Rabelo, Susan Aragón, Júlio César Bicca-Marques & Bruce W. Nelson.
Nested structures of species assemblages have been frequently associated with patch size and isolation, leading to the conclusion that colonization-extinction dynamics drives nestedness. The ‘passive sampling’ model states that the regional abundance of species randomly determines their occurrence in patches. The ‘habitat amount hypothesis’ also challenges patch size and isolation effects, arguing that they occur because of a 'sample area effect'. Here we (1) ask whether the structure of the mammal assemblages of fluvial islands...

Data from: Habitat use of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in Brazilian Amazon

Bingxin Wang, Daniel G. Rocha, Mark I. Abrahams, André P. Antunes, Hugo C. M. Costa, André Luis Sousa Gonçalves, Wilson Roberto Spironello, Milton José De Paula, Carlos A. Peres, Juarez Pezzuti, Emiliano Ramalho, Marcelo Lima Reis, , Fabio Rohe, David W. Macdonald & Cedric Kai Wei Tan
Amazonia forest plays a major role in providing ecosystem services for human and sanctuaries for wildlife. However, ongoing deforestation and habitat fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon has threatened both. The ocelot is an ecologically important mesopredator and a potential conservation ambassador species, yet there are no previous studies on its habitat preference and spatial patterns in this biome. From 2010 to 2017, twelve sites were surveyed, totaling 899 camera trap stations, the largest known dataset...

Data from: Testing main Amazonian rivers as barriers across time and space within widespread taxa

Renata Pirani, Fernanda Werneck, Andréa Thomaz, Mariah Kenney, Marcelo Sturaro, Teresa Cristina Avila-Pires, Pedro Peloso, Miguel Rodrigues & L. Lacey Knowles
Aim: Present Amazonian diversity patterns can result from many different mechanisms and, consequently, the factors contributing to divergence across regions and/or taxa may differ. Nevertheless, the river-barrier hypothesis (RBH) is still widely invoked as a causal process in divergence of Amazonian species. Here we use model-based phylogeographic analyses to test the extent to which major Amazonian rivers act similarly as barriers across time and space in two broadly distributed Amazonian taxa. Local: Amazon rainforest. Taxon:...

Seedlings leaf loss by herbivory in a fertilized forest in Central Amazonia (2019 - 2020)

F.A. Antonieto, R.L. Assis, I.P. Hartley, R. Di Ponzio & C.A. Quesada
Data are presented showing for individual seedling, herbivory damage at the leaf level; galls, pathogens, trail herbivory presence/absence qualitative data; and leaf mortality. Data were collected in each leaf from a plot based fertilisation experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP) approximately 100 km north of Manaus. Data were collected bimonthly from February 2019 to January 2020, by the dataset first author. Leaf loss in percentage was...

The combined role of dispersal and niche evolution in the diversification of Neotropical lizards

Fernanda P. Werneck, Yumi Sheu, Juan P. Zurano, Marco A. Ribeiro-Junior, Teresa C. Ávila-Pires, Miguel T. Rodrigues & Guarino R. Colli
Ecological requirements and environmental conditions can influence diversification across temporal and spatial scales. Understanding the role of ecological niche evolution under phylogenetic contexts provides insights on speciation mechanisms and possible responses to future climatic change. Large-scale phyloclimatic studies on the megadiverse Neotropics, where biomes with contrasting vegetation types occur in narrow contact, are rare. We integrate ecological and biogeographic data with phylogenetic comparative methods, to investigate the relative roles of biogeographic events and niche divergence...

The relative role of rivers, environmental heterogeneity and species traits in driving compositional changes in Southeastern Amazonian bird assemblages

Marina Maximiano, Fernando D'Horta, Hanna Tuomisto, Gabriela Zuquim, Jasper Van Doninck & Camila Ribas
Amazonian rivers have been proposed to act as geographic barriers to species dispersal, either driving allopatric speciation or defining current distribution limits. The strength of the barrier varies according to the species ecological characteristics and the river physical properties. Environmental heterogeneity may also drive compositional changes, but have hardly been assessed in Amazonia. Aiming to understand the contributions of riverine barriers and environmental heterogeneity in shaping compositional changes in Amazonian forest bird assemblages, we focus...

Bamboo phenology and life cycle drive seasonal and long-term functioning of Amazonian bamboo-dominated forests

Belen Fadrique, Daniel Gann, Bruce Nelson, Sassan Saatchi & Kenneth Feeley
1. Bamboo-dominated forests (BDF) extend over large areas in the drought-prone Southwestern Amazon, yet little is known about the dynamics of these ecosystems. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that bamboo modulates large-scale ecosystem dynamics through competition with coexisting trees for water. 2. We examined spatio-temporal patterns of remotely sensed metrics (Enhanced Vegetation Index [EVI], Normalized Difference Moisture Index [NDMI]) in >300 Landsat images as proxies for canopy leaf phenology and water content at two time...

Abundance of herbaceous bamboos in Central Amazonia

Leonardo Ziccardi
Density and growth of Olyra latifolia L. and Taquara micrantha (Kunth) I.L.C. Oliveira & R.P. Oliveira were sampled in November 2017 in the municipality of Autazes, Amazonas, Brazil. This data was used in "Forest Fires Facilitate Growth of Herbaceous Bamboos in Central Amazonia" (Ziccardi et al., 2020). The dataset is composed by 14 variables and 36 cases (rows). Is combines data from canopy openness (collected with a hemispheric camera) with remote sensing (Vertical distance to...

Final matrices: SNPs and mtDNA of Synallaxis albigularis / Mazaria propinqua

Waleska Barbosa
Differentiated habitat use can predict the diversity and genetic structure of Amazonian birds. Making this link between the intrinsic characteristics of organisms and the patterns of genetic diversity can provide us with insights into the evolutionary processes that act on species and also on the history of environments. About 15% of non-aquatic birds in the Amazon are restricted to river-created habitats, and have different levels of habitat affinity. In this study we investigated the evolutionary...

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