71 Works

Data from: Systematics of spiny-backed treefrogs (Hylidae: Osteocephalus): an Amazonian puzzle

Karl-Heinz Jungfer, Julián Faivovich, José M. Padial, Santiago Castroviejo-Fisher, Mariana M. Lyra, Bianca Von Muller Berneck, Patricia P. Iglesias, Philippe J. R. Kok, Ross T. Macculloch, Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues, Vanessa K. Verdade, Claudia P. Torres Gastello, Juan Carlos Chaparro, Paula H. Valdujo, Steffen Reichle, Jiří Moravec, Václav Gvoždík, Giussepe Gagliardi-Urrutia, Raffael Ernst, Ignacio De La Riva, Donald Bruce Means, Albertina P. Lima, J. Celsa Señaris, Ward C. Wheeler & Célio F. B. Haddad
Spiny-backed tree frogs of the genus Osteocephalus are conspicuous components of the tropical wet forests of the Amazon and the Guiana Shield. Here, we revise the phylogenetic relationships of Osteocephalus and its sister group Tepuihyla, using up to 6134 bp of DNA sequences of nine mitochondrial and one nuclear gene for 338 specimens from eight countries and 218 localities, representing 89% of the 28 currently recognized nominal species. Our phylogenetic analyses reveal (i) the paraphyly...

Drought-driven wildfire impacts on structure and dynamics in a wet Central Amazonian forest

Aline Pontes-Lopes, Camila V. J. Silva, Jos Barlow, Lorena M. Rincón, Wesley A. Campanharo, Cássio A. Nunes, Catherine T. De Almeida, Celso H. L. Silva Junior, Henrique L. G. Cassol, Ricardo Dalagnol, Scott C. Stark, Paulo M.L.A. Graça & Luiz E. O. C. Aragão
While climate and human-induced forest degradation is increasing in the Amazon, fire impacts on forest dynamics remain understudied in the wetter regions of the basin, which are susceptible to large wildfires only during extreme droughts. To address this gap, we installed burned and unburned plots immediately after a wildfire in the northern Purus-Madeira (central Amazon) during the 2015 El-Niño. We measured all individuals ≥10cm in diameter at breast height, and conducted recensuses to track the...

Bat phylogenetic responses to regenerating Amazonian forests

Fábio Z. Farneda, Ricardo Rocha, Sabhrina Gita Aninta, Adrià López-Baucells, Erica M. Sampaio, Jorge M. Palmeirim, Paulo E. D. Bobrowiec, Cristian S. Dambros & Christoph F. J. Meyer
1. Throughout the tropics, regenerating secondary forests occupy vast areas previously cleared for agriculture and cattle ranching. However, despite the importance of regenerating forests in mitigating the pervasive negative consequences of forest loss and fragmentation on forest-associated biodiversity, longitudinal studies on species’ phylogenetic responses to matrix regeneration are rare. 2. We surveyed bats in continuous primary forest, primary forest fragments and in the regenerating secondary forest matrix of a whole-ecosystem Amazonian fragmentation experiment, ~15 and...

Community composition of tree and palm species in a forest with bamboo in southwestern Amazonia

Leonardo Ziccardi & Philip Fearnside
A forest inventory was conducted in August 2016 in the municipality of Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil. This data was used in "Community composition of tree and palm species following disturbance in a forest with bamboo in southwestern Amazonia, Brazil" (Ziccardi et al., 2021). The dataset is composed by 5 variables and 1224 cases (rows). It presents data for species identified in a total of 24 plots distributed in three treatments: Fire + Logging (1); Fire...

Mapping Africa’s biodiversity: more of the same is just not good enough

Harith Farooq, Josué Azevedo, Amadeu Soares, Alexandre Antonelli & Søren Faurby
Species distribution data are fundamental to the understanding of biodiversity patterns and processes. Yet, such data are strongly affected by sampling biases, mostly related to site accessibility. The understanding of these biases is therefore crucial in systematics, biogeography and conservation. Here we present a novel approach for quantifying sampling effort and its impact on biodiversity knowledge, focusing on Africa. In contrast to previous studies assessing sampling completeness (percentage of species recorded in relation to predicted),...

Higher rates of liana regeneration after canopy fall drives species abundance patterns in central Amazonia

Elisangela Rocha, Juliana Schietti, Caian Gerolamo, Robyn Burnham & Anselmo Nogueira
In tropical rainforest, most vascular plants have some capacity to resprout, and lianas are often effective resprouters after canopy fall. However, the diversity of resprouting responses of liana species and the consequence for plant persistence is poorly understood. We hypothesized that variation in regeneration among liana species causes differences in liana species abundance in tropical rainforest through differential resprouting capacity, such that liana species with higher densities produce more resprouts after canopy falls. We applied...

Seedlings leaf loss by herbivory in a fertilized forest in Central Amazonia (2019 - 2020)

F.A. Antonieto, R.L. Assis, I.P. Hartley, R. Di Ponzio & C.A. Quesada
Data are presented showing for individual seedling, herbivory damage at the leaf level; galls, pathogens, trail herbivory presence/absence qualitative data; and leaf mortality. Data were collected in each leaf from a plot based fertilisation experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (BDFFP) approximately 100 km north of Manaus. Data were collected bimonthly from February 2019 to January 2020, by the dataset first author. Leaf loss in percentage was...

Data from: Edaphic factors determining the occurrence of herbaceous legumes in Amazonian savannas

Claymir De Oliveira Cavalcante, Andréia Silva Flores & Reinaldo Imbrozio Barbosa
Edaphic factors have been indicated as a determinant of the distribution of plant communities in Amazonia. The aim of this study was to detect which edaphic factors determine the occurrence of herbaceous legumes in Amazonian savannas. Therefore, an inventory of herbaceous flora of the family Leguminosae was conducted in 34 permanent plots established in two savanna areas of Roraima, northern Brazilian Amazon. The importance value index was higher for Chamaecrista desvauxii (24.9%), Aeschynomene hystrix (15.7%)...

Data from: Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages

Rafael P. Leitão, Jansen Zuanon, Sebastien Villeger, Stephen E. Williams, Christopher Baraloto, Claire Fortunel, Fernando P. Mendonça & David Mouillot
There is broad consensus that the diversity of functional traits within species assemblages drives several ecological processes. It is also widely recognized that rare species are the first to go extinct following human-induced disturbances. Surprisingly, however, the functional importance of rare species is still poorly understood, particularly in tropical species-rich assemblages where the majority of species are rare and the rate of species extinction can be high. Here we investigated the consequences of local and...

Data from: \"Transcriptome sequences for Campanula gentilis\" in Genomic Resources Notes accepted 1 April 2015 – 31 May 2015

Töre Demet, Federico Luebert, Guilhem Mansion, Ludo A. H. Muller, M. Vidotto, E. Boscari, L. Congiu, A. Grapputo, L. Zane, Vera Maria Fonseca Almeida-Val, Maria Manuela Coelho, Tiago Filipe Jesus & Demet Töre
In this report, we present the transcriptome of a single accession of Campanula gentilis Kovanda, obtained through the sequencing of both a normalized and a non-normalized cDNA library generated from stem and leaf tissue. The resources we provide include the raw sequence reads, the assembled contigs, the putative open reading frames, the contig/ORF annotations and the normalized as well as non-normalized expression levels.

Data from: Habitat amount hypothesis and passive sampling explain mammal species composition in Amazonian river islands

Rafael M. Rabelo, Susan Aragón, Júlio César Bicca-Marques & Bruce W. Nelson.
Nested structures of species assemblages have been frequently associated with patch size and isolation, leading to the conclusion that colonization-extinction dynamics drives nestedness. The ‘passive sampling’ model states that the regional abundance of species randomly determines their occurrence in patches. The ‘habitat amount hypothesis’ also challenges patch size and isolation effects, arguing that they occur because of a 'sample area effect'. Here we (1) ask whether the structure of the mammal assemblages of fluvial islands...

Data from: Habitat use of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in Brazilian Amazon

Bingxin Wang, Daniel G. Rocha, Mark I. Abrahams, André P. Antunes, Hugo C. M. Costa, André Luis Sousa Gonçalves, Wilson Roberto Spironello, Milton José De Paula, Carlos A. Peres, Juarez Pezzuti, Emiliano Ramalho, Marcelo Lima Reis, , Fabio Rohe, David W. Macdonald & Cedric Kai Wei Tan
Amazonia forest plays a major role in providing ecosystem services for human and sanctuaries for wildlife. However, ongoing deforestation and habitat fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon has threatened both. The ocelot is an ecologically important mesopredator and a potential conservation ambassador species, yet there are no previous studies on its habitat preference and spatial patterns in this biome. From 2010 to 2017, twelve sites were surveyed, totaling 899 camera trap stations, the largest known dataset...

Data from: Effect of distance to edge and edge interaction on seedling regeneration and biotic damage in tropical rainforest fragments: a long‐term experiment

Julieta Benítez-Malvido, Amparo Lazaro & Isolde D. K. Ferraz
In forest fragments, edge effects can influence forest regeneration, but little is known about how edge effects influence seedling performance and the interaction between seedlings and their natural enemies over time. In central Amazonia, we recorded survival and growth (in height and leaf number) and damage by insect herbivores and leaf‐fungal pathogens of Chrysophyllum pomiferum (Sapotaceae) seedlings that were exposed to different numbers of edges and to different distances from the forest edge. Grown seedlings...

Data from: Testing main Amazonian rivers as barriers across time and space within widespread taxa

Renata Pirani, Fernanda Werneck, Andréa Thomaz, Mariah Kenney, Marcelo Sturaro, Teresa Cristina Avila-Pires, Pedro Peloso, Miguel Rodrigues & L. Lacey Knowles
Aim: Present Amazonian diversity patterns can result from many different mechanisms and, consequently, the factors contributing to divergence across regions and/or taxa may differ. Nevertheless, the river-barrier hypothesis (RBH) is still widely invoked as a causal process in divergence of Amazonian species. Here we use model-based phylogeographic analyses to test the extent to which major Amazonian rivers act similarly as barriers across time and space in two broadly distributed Amazonian taxa. Local: Amazon rainforest. Taxon:...

The relative role of rivers, environmental heterogeneity and species traits in driving compositional changes in Southeastern Amazonian bird assemblages

Marina Maximiano, Fernando D'Horta, Hanna Tuomisto, Gabriela Zuquim, Jasper Van Doninck & Camila Ribas
Amazonian rivers have been proposed to act as geographic barriers to species dispersal, either driving allopatric speciation or defining current distribution limits. The strength of the barrier varies according to the species ecological characteristics and the river physical properties. Environmental heterogeneity may also drive compositional changes, but have hardly been assessed in Amazonia. Aiming to understand the contributions of riverine barriers and environmental heterogeneity in shaping compositional changes in Amazonian forest bird assemblages, we focus...

The combined role of dispersal and niche evolution in the diversification of Neotropical lizards

Fernanda P. Werneck, Yumi Sheu, Juan P. Zurano, Marco A. Ribeiro-Junior, Teresa C. Ávila-Pires, Miguel T. Rodrigues & Guarino R. Colli
Ecological requirements and environmental conditions can influence diversification across temporal and spatial scales. Understanding the role of ecological niche evolution under phylogenetic contexts provides insights on speciation mechanisms and possible responses to future climatic change. Large-scale phyloclimatic studies on the megadiverse Neotropics, where biomes with contrasting vegetation types occur in narrow contact, are rare. We integrate ecological and biogeographic data with phylogenetic comparative methods, to investigate the relative roles of biogeographic events and niche divergence...

Bamboo phenology and life cycle drive seasonal and long-term functioning of Amazonian bamboo-dominated forests

Belen Fadrique, Daniel Gann, Bruce Nelson, Sassan Saatchi & Kenneth Feeley
1. Bamboo-dominated forests (BDF) extend over large areas in the drought-prone Southwestern Amazon, yet little is known about the dynamics of these ecosystems. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that bamboo modulates large-scale ecosystem dynamics through competition with coexisting trees for water. 2. We examined spatio-temporal patterns of remotely sensed metrics (Enhanced Vegetation Index [EVI], Normalized Difference Moisture Index [NDMI]) in >300 Landsat images as proxies for canopy leaf phenology and water content at two time...

Abundance of herbaceous bamboos in Central Amazonia

Leonardo Ziccardi
Density and growth of Olyra latifolia L. and Taquara micrantha (Kunth) I.L.C. Oliveira & R.P. Oliveira were sampled in November 2017 in the municipality of Autazes, Amazonas, Brazil. This data was used in "Forest Fires Facilitate Growth of Herbaceous Bamboos in Central Amazonia" (Ziccardi et al., 2020). The dataset is composed by 14 variables and 36 cases (rows). Is combines data from canopy openness (collected with a hemispheric camera) with remote sensing (Vertical distance to...

Final matrices: SNPs and mtDNA of Synallaxis albigularis / Mazaria propinqua

Waleska Barbosa
Differentiated habitat use can predict the diversity and genetic structure of Amazonian birds. Making this link between the intrinsic characteristics of organisms and the patterns of genetic diversity can provide us with insights into the evolutionary processes that act on species and also on the history of environments. About 15% of non-aquatic birds in the Amazon are restricted to river-created habitats, and have different levels of habitat affinity. In this study we investigated the evolutionary...

Admixture may be extensive among hyperdominant Amazon rainforest tree species

Drew Larson, Oscar Vargas, Alberto Vicentini & Christopher W. Dick
Admixture is a mechanism by which species of long-lived plants may acquire novel alleles. However, the potential role of admixture in the origin and maintenance of tropical plant diversity is unclear. We ask whether admixture occurs in an ecologically important clade of Eschweilera (Parvifolia clade, Lecythidaceae), which includes some of the most widespread and abundant tree species in Amazonian forests. Using target capture sequencing, we conducted a detailed phylogenomic investigation of 33 species in the...

Pied tamarins go multimodal in response to anthropogenic noise

Tainara Sobroza, Jacob Dunn, Marcelo Gordo & Adrian Barnett
Sounds produced by human activities are often loud and may mask acoustic signals used by other species for communication. To circumvent this, animals may use various strategies, including shifting modality completely or complementing acoustic information by also using another modality of communication. Here we tested the overlooked multimodal shift hypothesis using pied tamarins (Saguinus bicolor) as models. We predicted that in noisier areas the species would exhibit more scent marking behaviour (i.e., olfactory communication), while...

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Affiliations

  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
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  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
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  • University of Sao Paulo
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