7 Works

Data from: Human management and hybridization shape treegourd fruits in the Brazilian Amazon Basin

Priscila Ambrosio Moreira, Cédric Mariac, Leila Zekraoui, Marie Couderc, Doriane Picanco Rodrigues, Charles R. Clement & Yves Vigouroux
Local people's perceptions of cultivated and wild agrobiodiversity, as well as their management of hybridization are still understudied in Amazonia. Here we analyze domesticated treegourd (Crescentia cujete), whose versatile fruits have technological, symbolic and medicinal uses. A wild relative (C. amazonica) of the cultivated species grows spontaneously in Amazonian flooded forests. We demonstrated, using whole chloroplast sequences and nuclear microsatellites, that the two species are strongly differentiated. Nonetheless, they hybridize readily throughout Amazonia and the...

Data from: Is environmental legislation conserving tropical stream faunas? a large-scale assessment of local, riparian and catchment-scale influences on Amazonian stream fish

Cecília G. Leal, Jos Barlow, Toby Gardner, Robert M. Hughes, Rafael P. Leitão, Ralph Mac Nally, Philip R. Kaufmann, Silvio F. B. Ferraz, Jansen Zuanon, Felipe R. De Paula, Joice Ferreira, James R. Thomson, Gareth D. Lennox, Eurizângela P. Dary, Cristhiana P. Röpke, Paulo S. Pompeu & Toby A. Gardner
1.Agricultural expansion and intensification are major threats to tropical biodiversity. In addition to the direct removal of native vegetation, agricultural expansion often elicits other human-induced disturbances, many of which are poorly addressed by existing environmental legislation and conservation programmes. This is particularly true for tropical freshwater systems, where there is considerable uncertainty about whether a legislative focus on protecting riparian vegetation is sufficient to conserve stream fauna. 2.To assess the extent to which stream fish...

Data from: Contrasting patterns of gene flow for Amazonian snakes that actively forage and those that wait in ambush

Rafael De Fraga, Albertina P. Lima, William E. Magnusson, Miquéias Ferrão & Adam J. Stow
Knowledge of genetic structure, geographic distance and environmental heterogeneity can be used to identify environmental features and natural history traits that influence dispersal and gene flow. Foraging mode is a trait that might predict dispersal capacity in snakes, because actively foragers typically have greater movement rates than ambush predators. Here we test the hypothesis that two actively foraging snakes have higher levels of gene flow than two ambush predators. We evaluated these four co-distributed species...

Data from: How do seasonality, substrate, and management history influence macrofungal fruiting assemblages in a central Amazonian Forest?

Dirce Leimi Komura, Jean-Marc Moncalvo, Cristian S. Dambros, Larissa S. Bento, Maria A. Neves & Charles E. Zartman
Worldwide, fungal richness peaks in tropical forest biomes where they are the primary drivers of decomposition. Understanding how environmental and anthropogenic factors influence tropical macrofungal fruiting patterns should provide insight as to how, for example, climate change and deforestation may impact their long-term demographic stability and evolutionary potential. However, in Amazonia no studies have yet to disentangle the effects of substrate, seasonality and forest history on phenology. Here, we quantitate spatial and temporal variation in...

Data from: Coevolution between flight morphology, vertical stratification and sexual dimorphism: what can we learn from tropical butterflies?

Márlon B. Graça, Pedro A.C.L. Pequeno, Elizabeth Franklin & José W. Morais
Occurrence patterns are partly shaped by the affinity of species with habitat conditions. For winged organisms, flight-related attributes are vital for ecological performance. However, due to the different reproductive roles of each sex, we expect divergence in flight energy budget, and consequently different selection responses between sexes. We used tropical frugivorous butterflies as models to investigate coevolution between flight morphology, sex dimorphism and vertical stratification. We studied 94 species of Amazonian fruit-feeing butterflies sampled in...

Data from: Wood density of trees in savannas of the northern Brazilian Amazon

Sewbert Rodrigues Jati, Philip Martin Fearnside & Reinaldo Imbrozio Barbosa
Wood density (WD) is an important variable for estimating tree carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems. WD has been little studied in savanna areas in the Brazilian Amazon. The aim of this study was to investigate variation in WD in eight tree species that occur in the open savannas of Roraima, the largest savanna area in the northern Brazilian Amazon. Variations were observed in WD in relation to species and diameter along the vertical dimension of...

Data from: Edaphic factors determining the occurrence of herbaceous legumes in Amazonian savannas

Claymir De Oliveira Cavalcante, Andréia Silva Flores & Reinaldo Imbrozio Barbosa
Edaphic factors have been indicated as a determinant of the distribution of plant communities in Amazonia. The aim of this study was to detect which edaphic factors determine the occurrence of herbaceous legumes in Amazonian savannas. Therefore, an inventory of herbaceous flora of the family Leguminosae was conducted in 34 permanent plots established in two savanna areas of Roraima, northern Brazilian Amazon. The importance value index was higher for Chamaecrista desvauxii (24.9%), Aeschynomene hystrix (15.7%)...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    7
  • Federal University of Amazonas
    2
  • Royal Ontario Museum
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    1
  • Federal University of Lavras
    1
  • University of Vermont
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso
    1
  • La Trobe University
    1