6 Works

Data from: Predicted 2100 climate scenarios affects growth and skeletal development of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) larvae

Ivã G. Lopes, Thyssia B. Araújo-Dairiki, Juliana T. Kojima, Adalberto L. Val & Maria C. Portella
Climate changes driven by greenhouse gas emissions have been occurring in an accelerated degree, affecting environmental dynamics and living beings. Among all affected biomes, the Amazon is particularly subjected to adverse impacts, such as temperature rises and water acidification. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of predicted climate change on initial growth and development of an important Amazonian food fish, the tambaqui. We analyzed growth performance, and monitored the initial osteogenic process and the...

Data from: Reproductive traits as predictors of assembly chronosequence patterns in epiphyllous bryophyte metacommunities

Adriel M. Sierra, José Julio Toledo, Noris Salazar Allen & Charles E. Zartman
1) Understanding the mechanisms underlying species assembly is a central focus of plant ecology and is crucial to revealing how plant communities are structured. However, the temporal limitations of most terrestrial plant communities preclude collection of species assembly data in a tractable time-frame. 2) The aim of this study is to investigate the importance of dispersal potential, as estimated by inter-specific variation in sexual and asexual expression, as a predictor of patch chronosequence assembly for...

Data from: Age‐dependent leaf physiology and consequences for crown‐scale carbon uptake during the dry season in an Amazon evergreen forest

Loren P. Albert, Jin Wu, Neill Prohaska, Plinio Barbosa De Camargo, Travis E. Huxman, Edgard S. Tribuzy, Valeriy Y. Ivanov, Rafael S. Oliveira, Sabrina Garcia, Marielle N. Smith, Raimundo Cosme Oliveira Junior, Natalia Restrepo-Coupe, Rodrigo Da Silva, Scott C. Stark, Giordane A. Martins, Deliane V. Penha & Scott R. Saleska
* Satellite and tower-based metrics of forest-scale photosynthesis generally increase with dry season progression across central Amazônia, but the underlying mechanisms lack consensus. * We conducted demographic surveys of leaf age composition, and measured age-dependence of leaf physiology in broadleaf canopy trees of abundant species at a central eastern Amazon site. Using a novel leaf-to-branch scaling approach, we used this data to independently test the much-debated hypothesis—arising from satellite and tower-based observations—that leaf phenology could...

Data from: Subtle changes in elevation shift bat-assemblage structure in Central Amazonia

, Lucas Gabriel Do Amaral Pereirab, Valéria Da Cunha Tavaresc, William E. Magnussond, Fabricio Beggiato Baccaroe & Paulo Estefano D. Bobrowiec
The distribution patterns of animal species at local scales have been explained by direct influences of vegetation structure, topography, food distribution and availability. However, these variables can also interact and operate indirectly on the distribution of species. Here, we examined the direct and indirect effects of food availability (fruits and insects), vegetation clutter and elevation in structuring phyllostomid-bat assemblages in a continuous terra firme forest in Central Amazonia. Bats were captured in 49 plots over...

Data from: Effect of distance to edge and edge interaction on seedling regeneration and biotic damage in tropical rainforest fragments: a long‐term experiment

Julieta Benítez-Malvido, Amparo Lazaro & Isolde D. K. Ferraz
In forest fragments, edge effects can influence forest regeneration, but little is known about how edge effects influence seedling performance and the interaction between seedlings and their natural enemies over time. In central Amazonia, we recorded survival and growth (in height and leaf number) and damage by insect herbivores and leaf‐fungal pathogens of Chrysophyllum pomiferum (Sapotaceae) seedlings that were exposed to different numbers of edges and to different distances from the forest edge. Grown seedlings...

Data from: Habitat amount hypothesis and passive sampling explain mammal species composition in Amazonian river islands

Rafael M. Rabelo, Susan Aragón, Júlio César Bicca-Marques & Bruce W. Nelson.
Nested structures of species assemblages have been frequently associated with patch size and isolation, leading to the conclusion that colonization-extinction dynamics drives nestedness. The ‘passive sampling’ model states that the regional abundance of species randomly determines their occurrence in patches. The ‘habitat amount hypothesis’ also challenges patch size and isolation effects, arguing that they occur because of a 'sample area effect'. Here we (1) ask whether the structure of the mammal assemblages of fluvial islands...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    6
  • Federal University of Western Pará
    2
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1
  • Federal University of Amazonas
    1
  • Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul
    1
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    1
  • University of Sao Paulo
    1