9 Works

Data from: Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and America

Duncan N. L. Menge, Ryan A. Chisholm, Stuart J. Davies, Kamariah Abu Salim, David Allen, Mauricio Alvarez, Norm Bourg, Warren Y. Brockelman, Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, Nathalie Butt, Min Cao, Wirong Chanthorn, Wei-Chun Chao, Keith Clay, Richard Condit, Susan Cordell, João Batista Da Silva, H. S. Dattaraja, Ana Cristina Segalin De Andrade, Alexandre A. Oliveira, Jan Den Ouden, Michael Drescher, Christine Fletcher, Christian P. Giardina, C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke … & Tak Fung
Symbiotic nitrogen (N)‐fixing trees can provide large quantities of new N to ecosystems, but only if they are sufficiently abundant. The overall abundance and latitudinal abundance distributions of N‐fixing trees are well characterised in the Americas, but less well outside the Americas. Here, we characterised the abundance of N‐fixing trees in a network of forest plots spanning five continents, ~5,000 tree species and ~4 million trees. The majority of the plots (86%) were in America...

Data from: Maintenance of genetic and morphological identity in two sibling Syrrhopodon species (Calymperaceae, Bryopsida) despite extensive introgression

Marta R. Pereira, Alice Ledent, Patrick Mardulyn, Charles E. Zartman & Alain Vanderpoorten
Bryophytes are a group of land plants wherein the role of hybridization has long been challenged. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to circumvent the lack of molecular variation at selected loci previously used for phylogeny and morphology, we determine the level of genetic and morphological divergence and reproductive isolation between the sibling Syrrhopodon annotinus and S. simmondsii (Calymperaceae, Bryopsida) that occur in sympatry but in different habitats in lowland Amazonian rainforests. A clear morphological differentiation and...

Hidden in the DNA: insights on how multiple historical processes and natural history traits shaped patterns of cryptic diversity in an Amazon leaf-litter lizard Loxopholis osvaldoi (Squamata: Gymnophthalmidae).

Sergio Marques De Souza, Katia Machado Pellegrino, Tuliana Oliveira Brunes, Ana Carnaval, Roberta Pacheco Damasceno, Manoela Lima De Oliveira Borges, Carlos Candia Gallardo & Miguel Rodrigues
Aim: To investigate cryptic diversity and diversification timing in the putatively low-dispersal Amazonian leaf-litter lizard Loxopholis osvaldoi, and to ask how geography (rivers, isolation by distance, IBD), ecological drivers (isolation by environment, IBE) and historical factors (climatic refugia) explain intraspecific genetic variation. Location: Central Amazonia, Brazil. Taxon: Squamata; Gymnophthalmidae; Loxopholis osvaldoi. Methods: We sequenced two mitochondrial and two nuclear markers in 157 individuals. Phylogeographic structure and the occurrence of independent evolving lineages where explored through...

Data from: Why is Amazonia a ‘source’ of biodiversity? climate-mediated dispersal and synchronous speciation across the Andes in an avian group (Tityrinae)

Lukas J. Musher, Mateus Ferreira, Anya L. Auerbach, Jessica McKay & Joel Cracraft
Amazonia is a ‘source’ of biodiversity for other Neotropical ecosystems, but which conditions trigger in situ speciation and emigration is contentious. Three hypotheses for how communities have assembled include (1) a stochastic model wherein chance dispersal events lead to gradual emigration and species accumulation, (2) diversity-dependence wherein successful dispersal events decline through time due to ecological limits, and (3) barrier displacement wherein environmental change facilitates dispersal to other biomes via transient habitat corridors. We sequenced...

Data from: Using river color to predict Amazonian floodplain forest avifauna in the world’s largest black-water river basin

Thiago Orsi Laranjeiras, Luciano Nicolas Naka & Mario Cohn-Haft.
Despite the importance of rivers in Amazonian biogeography, avian distribution patterns in river-created habitats (i.e., floodplain forest) have been sparsely addressed. Here we explore geographic variation in floodplain forest avifauna, specifically regarding one of the most striking aspects of the Amazon: the diversity of river “colors” (i.e., types, based on the color of the water). We sampled the avifauna at 30 sites, located in 17 different rivers (nine black- and eight white-water), in the Rio...

Islands in a green ocean: spatially structured endemism in Amazonian white-sand vegetation

Flavio Costa, Mario Terra-Araújo, Charles Zartman, Cintia Cornelius, Fernanda Carvalho, Michael Hopkins, Pedro Viana, Eduardo Prata & Alberto Vicentini
Here, we examine the influence of the spatial distribution of open White-Sand Campina (WSC) in the Amazon on the species richness and beta-diversity of their vascular plants. It is well known that beta-diversity tends to increase with geographical distance, but the influence of habitat insularity on floristic composition and endemism is still unclear. We surveyed WSC in Central and Southwestern Amazon, generating lists of species occurrences by rapid-inventory techniques to evaluate the influence of island...

Data from: Avian ecological succession in the Amazon: a long-term case study following experimental deforestation

Cameron L. Rutt, Vitek Jirinec, Mario Cohn-Haft, William F. Laurance & Philip C. Stouffer
Approximately 20% of the Brazilian Amazon has now been deforested, and the Amazon is currently experiencing the highest rates of deforestation in a decade, leading to large-scale land-use changes. Roads have consistently been implicated as drivers of ongoing Amazon deforestation and may act as corridors to facilitate species invasions. Long-term data, however, are necessary to determine how ecological succession alters avian communities following deforestation and whether established roads lead to a constant influx of new...

Data from: Habitat use of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) in Brazilian Amazon

Bingxin Wang, Daniel G. Rocha, Mark I. Abrahams, André P. Antunes, Hugo C. M. Costa, André Luis Sousa Gonçalves, Wilson Roberto Spironello, Milton José De Paula, Carlos A. Peres, Juarez Pezzuti, Emiliano Ramalho, Marcelo Lima Reis, , Fabio Rohe, David W. Macdonald & Cedric Kai Wei Tan
Amazonia forest plays a major role in providing ecosystem services for human and sanctuaries for wildlife. However, ongoing deforestation and habitat fragmentation in the Brazilian Amazon has threatened both. The ocelot is an ecologically important mesopredator and a potential conservation ambassador species, yet there are no previous studies on its habitat preference and spatial patterns in this biome. From 2010 to 2017, twelve sites were surveyed, totaling 899 camera trap stations, the largest known dataset...

Data from: Testing main Amazonian rivers as barriers across time and space within widespread taxa

Renata Pirani, Fernanda Werneck, Andréa Thomaz, Mariah Kenney, Marcelo Sturaro, Teresa Cristina Avila-Pires, Pedro Peloso, Miguel Rodrigues & L. Lacey Knowles
Aim: Present Amazonian diversity patterns can result from many different mechanisms and, consequently, the factors contributing to divergence across regions and/or taxa may differ. Nevertheless, the river-barrier hypothesis (RBH) is still widely invoked as a causal process in divergence of Amazonian species. Here we use model-based phylogeographic analyses to test the extent to which major Amazonian rivers act similarly as barriers across time and space in two broadly distributed Amazonian taxa. Local: Amazon rainforest. Taxon:...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    9
  • University of Sao Paulo
    3
  • Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Liège
    1
  • Guangxi Institute of Botany
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Columbia University
    1
  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1