44 Works

Data from: Testing classical species properties with contemporary data: how 'bad species' in the brassy ringlets (Erebia tyndarus complex, Lepidoptera) turned good

Paolo Gratton, Emiliano Trucchi, Alessandra Trasatti, Giorgio Riccarducci, Silvio Marta, Giuliana Allegrucci, Donatella Cesaroni & Valerio Sbordoni
All species concepts are rooted in reproductive, and ultimately genealogical, relations. Genetic data are thus the most important source of information for species delimitation. Current ease of access to genomic data and recent computational advances are blooming a plethora of coalescent-based species delimitation methods. Despite their utility as objective approaches to identify species boundaries, coalescent-based methods i) rely on simplified demographic models that may fail to capture some attributes of biological species, ii) do not...

Data from: Highly overlapping winter diet in two sympatric lemming species revealed by DNA metabarcoding

Eeva M. Soininen, Gilles Gauthier, Frédéric Bilodeau, Dominique Berteaux, Ludovic Gielly, Pierre Taberlet, Galina Gussarova, Eva Bellemain, Kristian Hassel, Hans K. Stenøien, Laura Epp, Audun Schrøder-Nilsen, Christian Brochmann, Nigel G. Yoccoz & Audun Schrøder-Nielsen
Sympatric species are expected to minimize competition by partitioning resources, especially when these are limited. Herbivores inhabiting the High Arctic in winter are a prime example of a situation where food availability is anticipated to be low, and thus reduced diet overlap is expected. We present here the first assessment of diet overlap of high arctic lemmings during winter based on DNA metabarcoding of feces. In contrast to previous analyses based on microhistology, we found...

Data from: Comparative analyses of plastid and AFLP data suggest different colonization history and asymmetric hybridisation between Betula pubescens and B. nana

Pernille Bronken Eidesen, Inger Greve Alsos & Christian Brochmann
Birches (Betula spp.) hybridize readily, confounding genetic signatures of refugial isolation and postglacial migration. We aimed to distinguish hybridization from range-shift processes in the two widespread and cold-adapted species B. nana and B. pubescens, previously shown to share a similarly east–west-structured variation in plastid DNA (pDNA). We sampled the two species throughout their ranges and included reference samples of five other Betula species and putative hybrids. We analysed 901 individual plants using mainly nuclear high-resolution...

Data from: Regulatory RNA at the root of animals: dynamic expression of developmental lincRNAs in the calcisponge Sycon ciliatum

Jon Bråte, Marcin Adamski, Ralf Neumann, Kamran Shalchian-Tabrizi, Maja Adamska & Ralf S. Neumann
Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important regulatory roles during animal development, and it has been hypothesized that an RNA-based gene regulation has been important for the evolution of developmental complexity in animals. However, most studies of lncRNA gene regulation have been performed using model animal species, and very little is known about this type of gene regulation in non-bilaterians. We have therefore analyzed RNA-Seq data derived from a comprehensive set of embryogenesis stages in the...

Data from: Canine mammary tumours are affected by frequent copy number aberrations, including amplification of MYC and loss of PTEN

Kaja S. Borge, Silje Nord, Peter Van Loo, Ole C. Lingjærde, Gjermund Gunnes, Grethe I. G. Alnæs, Hiroko K. Solvang, Torben Lüders, Vessela N. Kristensen, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale & Frode Lingaas
Background: Copy number aberrations frequently occur during the development of many cancers. Such events affect dosage of involved genes and may cause further genomic instability and progression of cancer. In this survey, canine SNP microarrays were used to study 117 canine mammary tumours from 69 dogs. Results: We found a high occurrence of copy number aberrations in canine mammary tumours, losses being more frequent than gains. Increased frequency of aberrations and loss of heterozygosity were...

Data from: Mismatch between fishway operation and timing of fish movements: a risk for cascading effects in partial migration systems

Casper H. A. Van Leeuwen, Jon Museth, Odd Terje Sandlund, Tore Qvenild & Leif Asbjørn Vøllestad
Habitat fragmentation is a growing problem worldwide. Particularly in river systems, numerous dams and weirs hamper the movement of a wide variety of species. With the aim to preserve connectivity for fish, many barriers in river systems are equipped with fishways (also called fish passages or fish ladders). However, few fishways provide full connectivity. Here we hypothesized that restricted seasonal opening times of fishways can importantly reduce their effectiveness by interfering with the timing of...

Data from: Strong selection on male plumage in a hybrid zone between a hybrid bird species and one of its parents

Richard I. Bailey, Maria R. Tesaker, Cassandra N. Trier, Glenn-Peter Sætre & G.-P. Saetre
Homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS) requires reproductive barriers between hybrid and parent species, despite incomplete reproductive isolation (RI) between the parents. Novel secondary sexual trait values in hybrids may cause prezygotic isolation from both parents, whereas signals inherited by the hybrid from one parent species may cause prezygotic isolation with the other. Here we investigate whether differences in male plumage function as a premating barrier between the hybrid Italian sparrow and one of its parent species,...

Data from: Seasonal patterns of hormones, macroparasites, and microparasites in wild African ungulates: the interplay between stress, reproduction, and disease

Carrie A. Cizauskas, Wendy C. Turner, Neville I. Pitts, Wayne M. Getz & Neville Pitts
Sex hormones, reproductive status, and pathogen load all affect stress. Together with stress, these factors can modulate the immune system and affect disease incidence. Thus, it is important to concurrently measure these factors, along with their seasonal fluctuations, to better understand their complex interactions. Using steroid hormone metabolites from fecal samples, we examined seasonal correlations among zebra and springbok stress, reproduction, gastrointestinal (GI) parasite infections, and anthrax infection signatures in zebra and springbok in Etosha...

Data from: Serum-free and xenobiotic-free preservation of cultured human limbal epithelial cells

Oeygunn A. Utheim, Rakibul Islam, Torstein Lyberg, Borghild Roald, Jon Roger Eidet, Maria Fideliz De La Paz, Darlene A. Dartt, Sten Raeder, Tor Paaske Utheim & Oeygunn Utheim
Aim/Purpose of the Study: To develop a one-week storage method, without serum and xenobiotics, that would maintain cell viability, morphology, and phenotype of cultured human limbal epithelial sheets. Materials and Methods: Human limbal explants were cultured on intact human amniotic membranes for two weeks. The sheets were stored in a hermetically sealed container at 23°C in either a serum-free medium with selected animal serum-derived compounds (Quantum 286) or a xenobiotic-free medium (Minimal Essential Medium) for...

Data from: Climate and fishing steer ecosystem regeneration to uncertain economic futures

Thorsten Blenckner, Marcos Llope, Christian Möllmann, Rudi Voss, Martin F. Quaas, Michele Casini, Martin Lindegren, Carl Folke, Nils Chr. Stenseth & C. Mollmann
Overfishing of large predatory fish populations has resulted in lasting restructurings of entire marine food webs worldwide, with serious socio-economic consequences. Fortunately, some degraded ecosystems show signs of recovery. A key challenge for ecosystem management is to anticipate the degree to which recovery is possible. By applying a statistical food-web model, using the Baltic Sea as a case study, we show that under current temperature and salinity conditions, complete recovery of this heavily altered ecosystem...

Data from: The Pillars of Hercules as a bathymetric barrier to gene-flow promoting isolation in a global deep-sea shark (Centroscymnus coelolepis)

Diana Catarino, Halvor Knutsen, Ana Veríssimo, Esben Moland Olsen, Per Erik Jorde, Gui Menezes, Hanne Sannæs, David Stanković, Joan Batista Company, Francis Neat, Roberto Danovaro, Antonio Dell'Anno, Bastien Rochowski, Sergio Stefanni, Joan Baptista Company & Hanne Sannaes
Knowledge of the mechanisms limiting connectivity and gene-flow in deep-sea ecosystems is limited, especially for deep-sea sharks. The Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis) is a globally distributed and Near Threatened deep-sea shark. C. coelolepis population structure was studied using 11 nuclear microsatellite markers and a 497 bp fragment from the mtDNA Control Region. High levels of genetic homogeneity across the Atlantic (ΦST=-0.0091, FST= 0.0024, P > 0.05) were found suggesting one large population unit at this...

Data from: Evidence accumulation and choice maintenance are dissociated in human perceptual decision making

Mads Lund Pedersen, Tor Endestad & Guido Biele
Perceptual decision making in monkeys relies on decision neurons, which accumulate evidence and maintain choices until a response is given. In humans, several brain regions have been proposed to accumulate evidence, but it is unknown if these regions also maintain choices. To test if accumulator regions in humans also maintain decisions we compared delayed and self-paced responses during a face/house discrimination decision making task. Computational modeling and fMRI results revealed dissociated processes of evidence accumulation...

Data from: Mortality and lamb body mass growth in free-ranging domestic sheep – environmental impacts including lethal and non-lethal impacts of predators

Geraldine Mabille, Audun Stien, Torkild Tveraa, Atle Mysterud, Henrik Brøseth & John D. C. Linnell
The management and recovery of large predator populations in areas where human persecution has driven them to ecological extinction requires a solid understanding of the effects of both predation and food limitation on prey populations. We used 11 yr of data on reported losses among 17.3 million free-ranging sheep Ovis aries in the Norwegian farming industry to elucidate the relative roles of climate, vegetation characteristics, sheep densities, lamb body mass and densities of predators and...

Data from: Temporal variation of Bistorta vivipara-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in the High Arctic

Sunil Mundra, Mohammad Bahram, Leho Tedersoo, Håvard Kauserud, Rune Halvorsen, Pernille Eidesen & Pernille Bronken Eidesen
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are important for efficient nutrient uptake of several widespread arctic plant species. Knowledge of temporal variation of ECM fungi, and the relationship of these patterns to environmental variables, is essential to understand energy and nutrient cycling in Arctic ecosystems. We sampled roots of Bistorta vivipara ten times over two years; three times during the growing-season (June, July and September) and twice during winter (November and April) of both years. We found 668...

Data from: Effects of large-scale releases on the genetic structure of red sea bream (Pagrus major, Temminck et Schlegel) populations in Japan

Enrique Blanco Gonzalez, Masato Aritaki, Halvor Knutsen & Nobuhiko Taniguchi
Genotype dataGenotype dataRelease dataRelease data

Data from: Plastic and evolutionary gene expression responses are correlated in European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) sub-populations adapted to different thermal environments

Hannu Mäkinen, Spiros Papakostas, Leif Asbjørn Vøllestad, Erica H. Leder & Craig R. Primmer
Understanding how populations adapt to changing environmental conditions is a long-standing theme in evolutionary biology. Gene expression changes have been recognized as an important driver of local adaptation, but relatively little is known regarding the direction of change and in particular, about the interplay between plastic and evolutionary gene expression. We have previously shown that the gene expression profiles of European grayling (Thymallus thymallus) populations inhabiting different thermal environments include both plastic and evolutionary components....

Data from: Enhanced B-cell receptor recognition of the autoantigen transglutaminase 2 by efficient catalytic self-multimerization

Jorunn Stamnaes, Rasmus Iversen, M. Fleur Du Pré, Xi Chen & Ludvig M. Sollid
A hallmark of the gluten-driven enteropathy celiac disease is autoantibody production towards the enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2) that catalyzes the formation of covalent protein-protein cross-links. Activation of TG2-specific B cells likely involves gluten-specific CD4 T cells as production of the antibodies is dependent on disease-associated HLA-DQ allotypes and dietary intake of gluten. IgA plasma cells producing TG2 antibodies with few mutations are abundant in the celiac gut lesion. These plasma cells and serum antibodies to...

Data from: Multiple stressors in a top predator seabird: potential ecological consequences of environmental contaminants, population health and breeding conditions

Jan Ove Bustnes, Sophie Bourgeon, Eliza H. K. Leat, Ellen Magnusdottir, Hallvard Strøm, Sveinn A. Hanssen, Aevar Petersen, Kristin Olafsdottir, Katrine Borgå, Geir W. Gabrielsen & Robert W. Furness
Environmental contaminants may have impacts on reproduction and survival in wildlife populations suffering from multiple stressors. This study examined whether adverse effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increased with poor population health and breeding conditions in three colonies (60–74°N) of great skua (Stercorarius skua) in the north-eastern Atlantic (Shetland, Iceland and Bjørnøya [Bear Island]). POPs (organochlorines [OCs] and polybrominated diphenyl ethers [BDEs]) were measured in plasma of incubating birds (n = 222), concentrations differing nearly...

Data from: Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

Masahito Tsuboi, Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer & Niclas Kolm
Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple functions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky substrate (i.e. substrate guarding) to mouthbrooding introduces a novel function to the craniofacial system and offers an ideal opportunity to test the functional coupling hypothesis. Using...

Data from: The potential for spatial distribution indices to signal thresholds in marine fish biomass

Emilie Reuchlin-Hugenholtz, Nancy L. Shackell & Jeffrey A. Hutchings
The frequently observed positive relationship between fish population abundance and spatial distribution suggests that changes in distribution can be indicative of trends in abundance. If contractions in spatial distribution precede declines in spawning stock biomass (SSB), spatial distribution reference points could complement the SSB reference points that are commonly used in marine conservation biology and fisheries management. When relevant spatial distribution information is integrated into fisheries management and recovery plans, risks and uncertainties associated with...

Data from: Postcopulatory sexual selection is associated with accelerated evolution of sperm morphology

Melissah Rowe, Tomas Albrecht, Emily Rebecca Alison Cramer, Arild Johnsen, Terje Laskemoen, Jason T. Weir & Jan T. Lifjeld
Rapid diversification of sexual traits is frequently attributed to sexual selection, though explicit tests of this hypothesis remain limited. Spermatozoa exhibit remarkable variability in size and shape, and studies report a correlation between sperm morphology (sperm length and shape) and sperm competition risk or female reproductive tract morphology. However, whether postcopulatory processes (e.g. sperm competition and cryptic female choice) influence the speed of evolutionary diversification in sperm form is unknown. Using passerine birds, we quantified...

Data from: Vicariance, long-distance dispersal, and regional extinction–recolonization dynamics explain the disjunct circumpolar distribution of the arctic-alpine plant Silene acaulis

Galina Gussarova, Geraldine A. Allen, Yulia Mikhaylova, Laurie J. McCormick, Virginia Mirré, Kendrick L. Marr, Richard J. Hebda & Christian Brochmann
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Many arctic-alpine species have vast geographic ranges, but these may encompass substantial gaps whose origins are poorly understood. Here we address the phylogeographic history of Silene acaulis, a perennial cushion plant with a circumpolar distribution except for a large gap in Siberia. METHODS: We assessed genetic variation in a range-wide sample of 103 populations using plastid DNA (pDNA) sequences and AFLPs (amplified fragment length polymorphisms). We constructed a haplotype network and...

Data from: Seasonal diversity and dynamics of haptophytes in the Skagerrak, Norway, explored by high-throughput sequencing

Elianne Sirnæs Egge, Torill Vik Johannessen, Tom Andersen, Wenche Eikrem, Lucie Bittner, Aud Larsen, Ruth-Anne Sandaa, Bente Edvardsen & Elianne Sirnaes Egge
Microalgae in the division Haptophyta play key roles in the marine ecosystem and in global biogeochemical processes. Despite their ecological importance, knowledge on seasonal dynamics, community composition and abundance at the species level is limited due to their small cell size and few morphological features visible under the light microscope. Here, we present unique data on haptophyte seasonal diversity and dynamics from two annual cycles, with the taxonomic resolution and sampling depth obtained with high-throughput...

Data from: Behavioural responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes

Carla Freitas, Esben Moland Olsen, Even Moland, Lorenzo Ciannelli & Halvor Knutsen
Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30–80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a...

Data from: Temperature-associated habitat selection in a cold-water marine fish

Carla Freitas, Esben Moland Olsen, Halvor Knutsen, Jon Albretsen & Even Moland
Habitat selection is a complex process, which involves behavioural decisions guided by the multiple needs and constraints faced by individuals. Climate-induced changes in environmental conditions may alter those trade-offs and resulting habitat use patterns. In this study we investigated the effect of sea temperature on habitat selection and habitat use of acoustically tagged Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. Significant relationships between ocean temperature and habitat selection and use were found. Under...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • University of Oslo
    44
  • Norwegian Institute of Marine Research
    7
  • University of Agder
    5
  • Oslo University Hospital
    4
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    4
  • University of Gothenburg
    3
  • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
    3
  • Lund University
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2