37 Works

Data from: The fungus that came in from the cold: dry rot’s pre-adapted ability to invade buildings

Sudhagard V. Balasundaram, Jaqueline Hess, Michael B. Durling, S. C. Moody, Lisbeth Thorbek, Cinzia Progida, Kurt LaButti, Andrea Aerts, Kerrie Barry, Igor V. Grigoriev, Lynne Boddy, Nils Högberg, Håvard Kauserud, Daniel C. Eastwood & Inger Skrede
Many organisms benefit from being pre-adapted to niches shaped by human activity, and have successfully invaded man-made habitats. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which has a wide distribution in buildings in temperate and boreal regions, where it decomposes coniferous construction wood. Comparative genomic analyses and growth experiments using this species and its wild relatives revealed that S. lacrymans evolved a very effective brown rot decay compared to its wild relatives,...

Data from: Spatial mismatch between management units and movement ecology of a partially migratory ungulate

Erling L. Meisingset, Leif Egil Loe, Øystein Brekkum, Richard Bischof, Inger Maren Rivrud, Unni Støbet Lande, Barbara Zimmermann, Vebjørn Veiberg & Atle Mysterud
1. Population-level management is difficult to achieve if wildlife routinely crosses administrative boundaries, as is particularly frequent for migratory populations. However, the degree of mismatch between management units and scales at which ecological processes operate has rarely been quantified. Such insight is vital for delimiting functional population units of partially migratory species common in northern forest ecosystems. 2. We combined an extensive dataset of 412 GPS-marked red deer (Cervus elaphus) across Norway with information on...

Data from: Fungal communities influence decomposition rates of plant litter from two dominant trees species

Johan Asplund, Håvard Kauserud, Stef Bokhorst, Marit H. Lie, Mikael Ohlson & Line Nybakken
The home-field advantage hypothesis (HFA) predicts that plant litter decomposes faster than expected underneath the plant from which it originates. We tested this hypothesis in a decomposition experiment where litters were incubated reciprocally in neighbouring European beech and Norway spruce forests. We analysed fungal communities in the litter through DNA metabarcoding and evaluated the effect of mesofauna (mites and springtails) on litter mass loss by using different litter-bag mesh sizes. Accounting for general differences in...

Data from: Genome architecture enables local adaptation of Atlantic cod despite high connectivity

Julia M. I. Barth, Paul R. Berg, Per R. Jonsson, Sara Bonanomi, Hanna Corell, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Kerstin Johannesson, Per Erik Jorde, Halvor Knutsen, Per-Olav Moksnes, Bastiaan Star, Nils Chr. Stenseth, Henrik Svedäng, Sissel Jentoft & Carl André
Adaptation to local conditions is a fundamental process in evolution; however, mechanisms maintaining local adaptation despite high gene flow are still poorly understood. Marine ecosystems provide a wide array of diverse habitats that frequently promote ecological adaptation even in species characterized by strong levels of gene flow. As one example, populations of the marine fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are highly connected due to immense dispersal capabilities but nevertheless show local adaptation in several key...

Data from: Mutation predicts 40 million years of fly wing evolution

David Houle, Geir H. Bolstad, Kim Van Der Linde & Thomas F. Hansen
Mutation enables evolution, but the idea that adaptation is also shaped by mutational variation is controversial. Simple evolutionary hypotheses predict such a relationship if the supply of mutations constrains evolution, but it is not clear that constraints exist, and, even if they do, they may be overcome by long-term natural selection. Quantification of the relationship between mutation and phenotypic divergence among species will help to resolve these issues. Here we use precise data on over...

Data from: Genetic effects on life-history traits in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

Anne Duplouy, Swee Chong Wong, Jukka Corander, Rainer Lehtonen & Ilkka Hanski
Background: Adaptation to local habitat conditions may lead to the natural divergence of populations in life-history traits such as body size, time of reproduction, mate signaling or dispersal capacity. Given enough time and strong enough selection pressures, populations may experience local genetic differentiation. The genetic basis of many life-history traits, and their evolution according to different environmental conditions remain however poorly understood. Methods: We conducted an association study on the Glanville fritillary butterfly, using material...

Data from: Veronica officinalis product authentication using DNA metabarcoding and HPLC-MS reveals widespread adulteration with Veronica chamaedrys

Ancuta C. Raclariu, Andrei Mocan, Madalina Oana Popa, Laurian Vlase, Mihael C. Ichim, Gianina Crisan, Anne Krag Brysting & Hugo De Boer
Studying herbal products derived from local and traditional knowledge and their value chains is one of the main challenges in ethnopharmacology. The majority of these products have a long history of use, but non-harmonized trade and differences in regulatory policies between countries impact their value chains and lead to concerns over product efficacy, safety and quality. Veronica officinalis L. (common speedwell), a member of Plantaginaceae family, has a long history of use in European traditional...

Data from: A synopsis of the saddle fungi (Helvella: Ascomycota) in Europe – species delimitation, taxonomy and typification

Inger Skrede, Tor Carlsen & Trond Schumacher
Helvella is a widespread, speciose genus of large apothecial ascomycetes (Pezizomycete: Pezizales) that are found in terrestrial biomes of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. This study represents a beginning on assessing species limits and applying correct names for Helvella species based on type material and specimens in the university herbaria (fungaria) of Copenhagen (C), Harvard (FH) and Oslo (O). We use morphology and phylogenetic evidence from four loci – heat shock protein 90 (hsp), translation...

Data from: Migration in geographic and ecological space by a large herbivore

Wibke Peters, Mark Hebblewhite, Atle Mysterud, Derek Spitz, Stefano Focardi, Ferdinando Urbano, Nicolas Morellet, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, John D.C. Linnell, Francesca Cagnacci & John D. C. Linnell
Partial migration, when only part of the population migrates seasonally while the other part remains resident on the shared range, is the most common form of migration in ungulates. Migration is often defined by spatial separation of seasonal ranges and consequently, classification of individuals as migrants or residents is usually only based on geographic criteria. However, the underlying mechanism for migration is hypothesized to be movement in response to spatiotemporal resource variability and thus, migrants...

Data from: Thermal plasticity in postembryonic life history traits of a widely distributed Collembola: Effects of macroclimate and microhabitat on genotypic differences

Sagnik Sengupta, Torbjørn Ergon & Hans Petter Leinaas
Life history traits in many ectotherms show complex patterns of variation among conspecific populations sampled along wide latitudinal or climatic gradients. However, few studies have assessed whether these patterns can be explained better by thermal reaction norms of multiple life history traits, covering major aspects of the life cycle. In this study, we compared five populations of a Holarctic, numerically dominant soil microarthropod species, Folsomia quadrioculata, sampled from a wide latitudinal gradient (56–81°N), for growth,...

Data from: Trans-oceanic genomic divergence of Atlantic cod ecotypes is associated with large inversions

Paul R. Berg, Bastiaan Star, Christophe Pampoulie, Ian R. Bradbury, Paul Bentzen, Jeffrey A. Hutchings, Sissel Jentoft & Kjetill S. Jakobsen
Chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions can play a crucial role in maintaining polymorphism underlying complex traits and contribute to the process of speciation. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), inversions of several megabases have been identified that dominate genomic differentiation between migratory and non-migratory ecotypes in the Northeast Atlantic. Here, we show that the same genomic regions display elevated divergence and contribute to ecotype divergence in the Northwest Atlantic as well. The occurrence of these inversions...

Data from: Responses of neurogenesis and neuroplasticity related genes to elevated CO2 levels in the brain of three teleost species

Floriana Lai, Cathrine E. Fagernes, Nicholas J. Bernier, Gabrielle M. Miller, Philip L. Munday, Fredrik Jutfelt & Göran E. Nilsson
The continuous increase of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting in ocean acidification has been reported to affect brain function in some fishes. During adulthood, cell proliferation is fundamental for fish brain growth and for it to adapt in response to external stimuli, such as environmental changes. Here we report the first expression study of genes regulating neurogenesis and neuroplasticity in brains of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), cinnamon anemonefish (Amphiprion melanopus) and spiny damselfish (Acanthochromis...

Data from: Fine-scale population dynamics in a marine fish species inferred from dynamic state-space models

Lauren A. Rogers, Geir O. Storvik, Halvor Knutsen, Esben M. Olsen & Nils Chr. Stenseth
Identifying the spatial scale of population structuring is critical for the conservation of natural populations and for drawing accurate ecological inferences. However, population studies often use spatially aggregated data to draw inferences about population trends and drivers, potentially masking ecologically relevant population sub-structure and dynamics. The goals of this study were to investigate how population dynamics models with and without spatial structure affect inferences on population trends and the identification of intrinsic drivers of population...

Data from: Pushing the limits of photoreception in twilight conditions: The rod-like cone retina of the deep-sea pearlsides

Fanny De Busserolles, Fabio Cortesi, Jon Vidar Helvik, Wayne I. L. Davies, Rachel M. Templin, Robert K. P. Sullivan, Craig T. Michell, Jessica K. Mountford, Shaun P. Collin, Xabier Irigoien, Stein Kaartvedt & Justin Marshall
Most vertebrates have a duplex retina comprising two photoreceptor types, rods for dim-light (scotopic) vision and cones for bright-light (photopic) and color vision. However, deep-sea fishes are only active in dim-light conditions; hence, most species have lost their cones in favor of a simplex retina composed exclusively of rods. Although the pearlsides, Maurolicus spp., have such a pure rod retina, their behavior is at odds with this simplex visual system. Contrary to other deep-sea fishes,...

Data from: Mapping and analysis of the connectome of sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat using a volumetric brain atlas

Bowen Dempsey, Sheng Le, Anita Turner, Phill Bokiniec, Radhika Ramadas, Jan G. Bjaalie, Clement Menuet, Rachael Neve, Andrew Allen, Ann Goodchild, Simon McMullan, Phil Bokiniec, Ann K. Goodchild & Andrew M. Allen
Spinally projecting neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a critical role in the generation of vasomotor sympathetic tone and are thought to receive convergent input from neurons at every level of the neuraxis; the factors that determine their ongoing activity remain unresolved. In this study we use a genetically restricted viral tracing strategy to definitively map their spatially diffuse connectome. We infected bulbospinal RVLM neurons with recombinant rabies variant that drives reporter expression...

Data from: On the missing link in ecology: improving communication between modellers and experimentalists

Jan Heuschele, Mikael T. Ekvall, Patrizio Mariani & Christian Lindemann
Collaboration between modellers and experimentalists is essential in ecological research, however, different obstacles linking both camps often hinder scientific progress. In this commentary, we discuss several issues of the current state of affairs in this research loop. Backed by an online survey amongst fellow ecologists, modellers and experimentalists alike, we identify two major areas that need to be mended. Firstly, differences in language and jargon lead to a lack of exchange of ideas and to...

Data from: Novel adverse outcome pathways revealed by chemical genetics in a developing marine fish

Elin Sørhus, John P. Incardona, Tomasz Furmanek, Giles W. Goetz, Nathaniel L. Scholz, Sonnich Meier, Rolf B. Edvardsen & Sissel Jentoft
Crude oil spills are a worldwide ocean conservation threat. Fish are particularly vulnerable to the oiling of spawning habitats, and crude oil causes severe abnormalities in embryos and larvae. However, the underlying mechanisms for these developmental defects are not well understood. Here, we explore the transcriptional basis for four discrete crude oil injury phenotypes in the early life stages of the commercially important Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). These include defects in (1) cardiac form and...

Data from: Fungal communities in Scandinavian lakes along a longitudinal gradient

Maryia Khomich, Marie L. Davey, Håvard Kauserud, Serena Rasconi & Tom Andersen
This study investigates the diversity and distribution of fungal communities in 77 oligotrophic lakes in southern Norway and Sweden using 454-sequencing with fungal-specific primers targeting ITS2 region of the rRNA gene. A total of 232 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to four recognized phyla were detected. A large proportion (70.69%) of the detected OTUs were Dikarya (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota), while Chytridiomycota dominated quantitatively (63.37% reads). The most abundant aquatic fungi were taxonomically assigned to Chytridiomycota,...

Data from: Comparative authentication of Hypericum perforatum herbal products using DNA metabarcoding, TLC and HPLC-MS

Ancuta Cristina Raclariu, Ramona Paltinean, Laurian Vlase, Aurelie Labarre, Vincent Manzanilla, Mihael Cristin Ichim, Gianina Crisan, Anne Krag Brysting & Hugo De Boer
Many herbal products have a long history of use, but there are increasing concerns over product efficacy, safety and quality in the wake of recent cases exposing discrepancies between labeling and constituents. When it comes to St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) herbal products, there is limited oversight, frequent off-label use and insufficient monitoring of adverse drug reactions. In this study, we use amplicon metabarcoding (AMB) to authenticate 78 H. perforatum herbal products and evaluate...

Data from: A giant spurrey on a tiny island: on the phylogenetic position of Sanctambrosia manicata (Caryophyllaceae) and the generic circumscriptions of Spergula, Spergularia and Rhodalsine

Anneleen Kool & Mats Thulin
The only member of the generally herbaceous family Caryophyllaceae that may grow to a small tree is Sanctambrosia manicata, endemic to remote San Ambrosio Island, off the coast of Chile. The monospecific Sanctambrosia has been suggested to be closely related to Spergula and Spergularia (spurreys) on the basis of morphology, despite its treelike habit and gynodioecy. A plastid DNA dataset (ndhF, rps16, trnL-F) is used to investigate the relationships of Sanctambrosia and other members of...

Data from: Millions of years behind: slow adaptation of ruminants to grasslands

Olja Toljagić, Kjetil L. Voje, Michael Matschiner, Lee H. Liow & Thomas F. Hansen
The Late-Cretaceous appearance of grasses, followed by the Cenozoic advancement of grasslands as dominant biomes, has contributed to the evolution of a range of specialized herbivores adapted to new diets, as well as to increasingly open and arid habitats. Many mammals including ruminants, the most diversified ungulate suborder, evolved high–crowned (hypsodont) teeth as an adaptation to tooth–wearing diets and habitats. The impact of different causes of tooth wear is still a matter of debate, and...

Data from: Immigrant reproductive dysfunction facilitates ecological speciation

Ola Svensson, Johanna Gräns, Malin C. Celander, Jonathan Havenhand, Erica H. Leder, Kai Lindström, Sofie Schöld, Cock Van Oosterhout & Charlotta Kvarnemo
The distributions of species are not only determined by where they can survive – they must also be able to reproduce. Although immigrant inviability is a well-established concept, the fact that immigrants also need to be able to effectively reproduce in foreign environments has not been fully appreciated in the study of adaptive divergence and speciation. Fertilization and reproduction are sensitive life history stages that could be detrimentally affected for immigrants in non-native habitats. We...

Data from: Is telomere length associated with mate choice in a songbird with a high rate of extra-pair paternity?

Arild Johnsen, Angela Pauliny, Jan T. Lifjeld & Donald Blomqvist
Telomere length is related to aging in many eukaryotes and the rate of telomere attrition has been suggested to reflect individual genetic quality. Telomere length could thus have implications for mate choice. We investigated telomere length variation in bluethroat Luscinia svecica families with mixed paternity, including social parents, extra-pair fathers and nestlings, testing whether telomere length is associated with social and/or extra-pair mate choice through assortative mating or selection of mates with relatively long telomeres....

Data from: A structured training program for health workers in intravenous treatment with fluids and antibiotics in nursing homes: a modified stepped-wedge cluster-randomised trial to reduce hospital admissions

Maria Romøren, Svein Gjelstad & Morten Lindbæk
Objectives: Hospitalization is potentially detrimental to nursing home patients and resource demanding for the specialist health care. This study assessed if a brief training program in administrating intravenous fluids and antibiotics in nursing homes could reduce hospital transfers and ensure high quality care locally. Design: A pragmatic and modified cluster randomized stepped-wedge trial with randomization on nursing home level. Participants: 330 cases in 296 nursing home residents from 30 nursing homes were included. Cases were...

Data from: Ancient DNA reveals the Arctic origin of Viking Age cod from Haithabu, Germany

Bastiaan Star, Sanne Boessenkool, Agata T. Gondek, Elena A. Nikulina, Anne Karin Hufthammer, Christophe Pampoelie, Halvor Knutsen, Carl Andre, Heidi M. Nistelberger, Jan Dierking, Christoph Petereit, Dirk Heinrich, Kjetill S. Jakobsen, Nils Chr. Stenseth, Sissel Jentoft & James H. Barrett
Knowledge of the range and chronology of historic trade and long-distance transport of natural resources is essential for determining the impacts of past human activities on marine environments. However, the specific biological sources of imported fauna are often difficult to identify, in particular if species have a wide spatial distribution and lack clear osteological or isotopic differentiation between populations. Here, we report that ancient fish-bone remains, despite being porous, brittle, and light, provide an excellent...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    37

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    37

Affiliations

  • University of Oslo
    37
  • University of Gothenburg
    5
  • Norwegian University of Life Sciences
    4
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    4
  • University of Agder
    3
  • University of Bergen
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • Norwegian Institute of Marine Research
    3
  • VU University Amsterdam
    2
  • Duke University
    2