55 Works

Data from: Ion microprobe measured stable isotope evidence for ammonite habitat and life mode during early ontogeny

Benjamin J. Linzmeier, Neil H. Landman, Shanan E. Peters, Reinhard Kozdon, Kouki Kitajima & John W. Valley
Ammonites have disparate adult morphologies indicative of diverse ecological niches, but ammonite hatchlings are small (~1 mm diameter), which raises questions about the similarity of egg incubation and hatchling life mode in ammonites. Modern Nautilus is sometimes used as a model organism for understanding ammonites, but despite their outward similarities, the groups are only distantly related. Trends in ammonite diversity and extinction vulnerability in the fossil record contrast starkly with those of nautilids, and embryonic...

Data from: Candidate variants for additive and interactive effects on bioenergy traits in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) identified by genome-wide association analyses

Guillaume P. Ramstein, Joseph Evans, Aruna Nandety, Malay C. Saha, E. Charles Brummer, Shawn M. Kaeppler, C. Robin Buell & Michael D. Casler
Switchgrass is a promising herbaceous energy crop, but further gains in biomass yield and quality must be achieved to enable a viable bioenergy industry. Developing DNA markers can contribute to such progress, but depiction of genetic bases should be reliable, involving not only simple additive marker effects but also interactions with genetic backgrounds, e.g., ecotypes, or synergies with other markers. We analyzed plant height, carbon content, nitrogen content, and mineral concentration in a diverse panel...

Data from: Risk factors for respiratory illness in a community of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii)

Melissa Emery Thompson, Zarin P. Machanda, Erik J. Scully, Drew K. Enigk, Emily Otali, Martin N. Muller, Tony L. Goldberg, Colin A. Chapman & Richard W. Wrangham
Respiratory disease has caused significant mortality in African great ape populations. While much effort has been given to identifying the responsible pathogens, little is known about the factors that influence disease transmission or individual susceptibility. In the Kanyawara community of wild chimpanzees, respiratory illness has been the leading cause of mortality over 30 years, contributing to 27% of deaths. Deaths were common in all age groups except juveniles. Over 22 years of health observations, respiratory...

Data from: Signatures of hybridization and speciation in genomic patterns of ancestry

John A. Hvala, Megan E. Frayer & Bret A. Payseur
Genomes sampled from hybrid zones between nascent species provide important clues into the speciation process. With advances in genome sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, it is now feasible to measure variation in gene flow with high genomic resolution. This progress motivates the development of conceptual and analytical frameworks for hybrid zones that complement well-established cline approaches. We extend the perspective that genomic distributions of ancestry are sensitive indicators of hybridization history. We use...

Data from: Legume abundance along successional and rainfall gradients in neotropical forests

Maga Gei, Danaë M. A. Rozendaal, Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, Janet I. Sprent, Mira D. Garner, T. Mitchell Aide, José Luis Andrade, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Pedro H.S. Brancalion, George A. L. Cabral, Ricardo Gomes César, Robin L. Chazdon, Rebecca J. Cole, Gabriel Dalla Colletta, Ben De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan Manuel Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mário Marcos Do Espírito Santo, G. Wilson Fernandes, Yule Roberta Ferreira Nunes … & Jennifer S. Powers
The nutrient demands of regrowing tropical forests are partly satisfied by nitrogen (N)-fixing legume trees, but our understanding of the abundance of those species is biased towards wet tropical regions. Here we show how the abundance of Leguminosae is affected by both recovery from disturbance and large-scale rainfall gradients through a synthesis of forest-inventory plots from a network of 42 Neotropical forest chronosequences. During the first three decades of natural forest regeneration, legume basal area...

Data from: The demography of a resource specialist in the tropics: Cecropia trees and the fitness of three-toed sloths

Mario F. Garces-Restrepo, M. Zachariah Peery & Jonathan N. Pauli
Resource specialists persist on a narrow range of resources. Consequently, the abundance of key resources should drive vital rates, individual fitness and population viability. While Neotropical forests feature both high levels of biodiversity and numbers of specialist species, no studies have directly evaluated how the variation of key resources affects the fitness of a tropical specialist. Here, we quantified the effect of key tree species density and forest cover on the fitness of three-toed sloths...

Data from: The epidemiology of avian pox and interaction with avian malaria in Hawaiian forest birds

Michael D. Samuel, Bethany L. Woodworth, Carter T. Atkinson, Patrick J. Hart & Dennis A. LaPointe
Despite the purported role of avian pox (Avipoxvirus spp.) in the decline of endemic Hawaiian birds, few studies have been conducted on the dynamics of this disease, its impact on free-living avian populations, or its interactions with avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum). We conducted four longitudinal studies of 3-7 years in length and used generalized linear models to evaluate cross–sectional prevalence of active pox infection and individuals with healed deformities that had recovered from pox. Our...

Data from: Leaf hydraulic parameters are more plastic in species that experience a wider range of leaf water potentials

Daniel M. Johnson, Z. Carter Berry, Kathyrn V. Baker, Duncan D. Smith, Katherine A. McCulloh, Jean-Christophe Domec & Kathryn V. Baker
1. Many plant species experience large differences in soil moisture availability within a season, potentially leading to a wide range of leaf water potentials (ΨLEAF). In order to decrease the risk of leaf dehydration, among species, there is a continuum ranging from strict control (isohydry) to little control (anisohydry) of minimum ΨLEAF. 2. In central Texas USA, species are exposed to a range of soil moisture from wet springs to hot, dry summers. There are...

Data from: The influence of topography and soil phosphorus on the vegetation of Korup Forest Reserve, Cameroun

Duncan W. Thomas, David M. Newbery, P. G. Waterman & J. S. Gartlan
All living trees (≥ 30 cm gbh) were enumerated in 135 80×80 m plots, each subdivided into four 40×40 m subplots, and arranged along four 5 km transect lines in the Korup Forest Reserve, Cameroun. For each plot altitude, slope and the extent of permanent and seasonal swamps were recorded. Four hundred and eleven taxa were recognized of which 66% were identified to species. Mean tree density was 471 ha−1, basal area 27.6 m2 ha−1...

Data from: Assessing impact of exogenous features on biotic phenomena in the presence of strong spatial dependence: a lake sturgeon case study in natural stream settings

Andrew O. Finley, Patrick S. Forsythe, James A. Crossman, Edward A. Baker & Kim T. Scribner
Modeling spatially explicit data provides a powerful approach to identify the effects of exogenous features associated with biological processes, including recruitment of stream fishes. However, the complex spatial and temporal dynamics of the stream and the species' reproductive and early life stage behaviors present challenges to drawing valid inference using traditional regression models. In these settings it is often difficult to ensure the spatial independence among model residuals---a key assumption that must be met to...

Data from: Associative nitrogen fixation (ANF) in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) across a nitrogen input gradient

Sarah S. Roley, David S. Duncan, Di Liang, Aaron Garoutte, Randall D. Jackson, James M. Tiedje & G. Philip Robertson
Associative N fixation (ANF), the process by which dinitrogen gas is converted to ammonia by bacteria in casual association with plants, has not been well-studied in temperate ecosystems. We examined the ANF potential of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), a North American prairie grass whose productivity is often unresponsive to N fertilizer addition, via separate short-term 15N2 incubations of rhizosphere soils and excised roots four times during the growing season. Measurements occurred along N fertilization gradients...

Data from: Spatial phylogenetics reveals evolutionary constraints on the assembly of a large regional flora

Daniel Spalink, Ricardo Kriebel, Pan Li, Matthew C. Pace, Bryan T. Drew, John G. Zaborsky, Jeffrey R. Rose, Chloe P. Drummond, Mary Ann Feist, William S. Alverson, Donald M. Waller, Kenneth M. Cameron, Thomas J. Givnish & Kenneth J. Sytsma
Premise of the study: We use spatial phylogenetics to analyze the assembly of the Wisconsin flora, linking processes of dispersal and niche evolution to spatial patterns in floristic and phylogenetic diversity, and testing whether phylogenetic niche conservatism can account for these patterns. Methods: We use digitized records and a new molecular phylogeny for all vascular plants in Wisconsin to estimate spatial variation in species richness and phylogenetic  and  diversity in a native flora...

Data from: Patterns of genetic differentiation in Colorado potato beetle correlate with contemporary, not historic, potato land cover

Michael S. Crossley, Silvia I. Rondon & Sean D. Schoville
Changing landscape heterogeneity can influence connectivity and alter genetic variation in local populations, but there can be a lag between ecological change and evolutionary responses. Temporal lag effects might be acute in agroecosystems, where land cover has changed substantially in the last two centuries. Here, we evaluate how patterns of an insect pest's genetic differentiation are related to past and present agricultural land cover change over a 150-year period. We quantified change in the amount...

Data from: Disentangling the genetic effects of refugial isolation and range expansion in a trans-continentally distributed species

Brendan N. Reid, Jamie M. Kass, Seth Wollney, Evelyn L. Jensen, Michael A. Russello, Ella M. Viola, Jenna Pantophlet, John B. Iverson, Marcus Z. Peery, Christopher J. Raxworthy & Eugenia Naro-Maciel
In wide-ranging taxa with historically dynamic ranges, past allopatric isolation and range expansion can both influence the current structure of genetic diversity. Considering alternate historical scenarios involving expansion from either a single refugium or from multiple refugia can be useful in differentiating the effects of isolation and expansion. Here, we examined patterns of genetic variability in the trans-continentally distributed painted turtle (Chrysemys picta). We utilized an existing phylogeographic dataset for the mitochondrial control region and...

Data from: Natal dispersal of tree sloths in a human-dominated landscape: implications for tropical biodiversity conservation

Mario F. Garces-Restrepo, Jonathan N. Pauli & M. Zachariah Peery
1. Habitat loss and fragmentation resulting from the conversion of tropical forests are among the most important threats to biodiversity globally. Habitat specialists and species with low dispersal capacity are expected to be the most sensitive to such changes. Relatively little is known, however, about how habitat change and life history interact to impact natal dispersal and population viability in tropical species. 2. Here, we characterized natal dispersal patterns, habitat selection, and survival rates in...

Data from: Rapid divergence of genome architectures following the origin of an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in the genus Amanita

Jaqueline Hess, Inger Skrede, Maryam Chaib De Mares, Matthieu Hainaut, Bernard Henrissat & Anne Pringle
Fungi are evolutionary shape shifters and adapt quickly to new environments. Ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbioses are mutualistic associations between fungi and plants and have evolved repeatedly and independently across the fungal tree of life, suggesting lineages frequently reconfigure genome content to take advantage of open ecological niches. To date analyses of genomic mechanisms facilitating EM symbioses have involved comparisons of distantly related species, but here, we use the genomes of three EM and two asymbiotic (AS)...

Water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei and surface tension: results from the MadFACTS campaign

Sara Forestieri, Sean Staudt, Thomas Kuborn, Christopher Ruehl, Timothy Bertram & Christopher Cappa
This data set is associated with the manuscript “Establishing the Impact of Model Surfactants on Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity of Sea Spray Aerosols” by Forestieri et al. that has been submitted to Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. The abstract to this manuscript is provided below. By reducing surface tension (σ), surfactants present in aerosols can increase their cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation efficiency. However, the importance of this effect is poorly constrained. Here we present estimates...

Data from: Brassicales phylogeny inferred from 72 plastid genes: a reanalysis of the phylogenetic localization of two paleopolyploid events and origin of novel chemical defenses

Patrick P. Edger, Jocelyn C. Hall, Alex Harkess, Michelle Tang, Jill Coombs, Setareh Mohammadin, M. Eric Schranz, Zhiyong Xiong, James Leebens-Mack, Blake C. Meyers, Kenneth J. Systma, Marcus A. Koch, Ihsan A. Al-Shehbaz, J. Chris Pires & Kenneth J. Sytsma
PREMISE OF THE STUDY - Previous phylogenetic studies employing molecular markers have yielded various insights into the evolutionary history across Brassicales, but many relationships between families remain poorly supported or unresolved. A recent phylotranscriptomic approach utilizing 1155 nuclear markers obtained robust estimates for relationships among 14 of 17 families. Here we report a complete family‐level phylogeny estimated using the plastid genome. METHODS - We conducted phylogenetic analyses on a concatenated data set comprising 44,926 bp...

Data from: Asymmetric evolutionary responses to sex-specific selection in a hermaphrodite

Nicolás Bonel, Elsa Noël, Tim Janicke, Kevin Sartori, Elodie Chapuis, Adeline Ségard, Stefania Meconcelli, Benjamin Pélissié, Violette Sarda & Patrice David
Sex allocation theory predicts that simultaneous hermaphrodites evolve to an evolutionary stable resource allocation, whereby any increase in investment to male reproduction leads to a disproportionate cost on female reproduction and vice-versa. However, empirical evidence for sexual trade-offs in hermaphroditic animals is still limited. Here, we tested how male and female reproductive traits evolved under conditions of reduced selection on either male or female reproduction for 40 generations in a hermaphroditic snail. This selection favors...

Data from: Aging infrastructure creates opportunities for cost-efficient restoration of aquatic ecosystem connectivity

Thomas M. Neeson, Allison T. Moody, Jesse R. O'Hanley, Matthew Diebel, Patrick J. Doran, Michael C. Ferris, Timothy Colling & Peter B. McIntyre
A hallmark of industrialization is the construction of dams for water management and roads for transportation, leading to fragmentation of aquatic ecosystems. Many nations are striving to address both maintenance backlogs and mitigation of environmental impacts as their infrastructure ages. Here, we test whether accounting for road repair needs could offer opportunities to boost conservation efficiency by piggybacking connectivity restoration projects on infrastructure maintenance. Using optimization models to align fish passage restoration sites with likely...

Data from: Phenotypic evolution shaped by current enzyme function in the bioluminescent courtship signals of sea fireflies

Nicholai M. Hensley, Emily A. Ellis, Gretchen A. Gerrish, Elizabeth Torres, John P. Frawley, Todd H. Oakley & Trevor J. Rivers
Mating behaviours are diverse and noteworthy, especially within species radiations where they may contribute to speciation. Studying how differences in mating behaviours arise between species can help us understand how diversity is generated at multiple biological levels. The bioluminescent courtship displays of cypridinid ostracods (or sea fireflies) are an excellent system for this since amazing variety evolves while using a conserved biochemical mechanism. We find that the evolution of one aspect in this behavioural phenotype...

Data from: Genotypic variation in plant traits shapes herbivorous insect and ant communities on a foundation tree species

Hilary L. Barker, Liza M. Holeski & Richard L. Lindroth
Community genetics aims to understand the effects of intraspecific genetic variation on community composition and diversity, thereby connecting community ecology with evolutionary biology. Multiple studies have shown that different plant genotypes harbor different communities of associated organisms, such as insects. Yet, the mechanistic links that tie insect community composition to plant genetics are still not well understood. To shed light on these relationships, we explored variation in both plant traits (e.g., growth, phenology, defense) and...

Data from: R2s for correlated data: phylogenetic models, LMMs, and GLMMs

Anthony R. Ives
Many researchers want to report an R2 to measure the variance explained by a model. When the model includes correlation among data, such as phylogenetic models and mixed models, defining an R2 faces two conceptual problems. (i) It is unclear how to measure the variance explained by predictor (independent) variables when the model contains covariances. (ii) Researchers may want the R2 to include the variance explained by the covariances by asking questions such as “How...

Data from: Drivers of nocturnal water flux in a tallgrass prairie

Kimberly O'Keefe & Jesse B. Nippert
1. Nocturnal transpiration can impact water balance from the local community to earth-atmosphere fluxes. However, the dynamics and drivers of nocturnal transpiration among coexisting plant functional groups in herbaceous ecosystems are unknown. 2. Here, we addressed the following questions: (1) How do nocturnal (Enight) and diurnal (Eday) transpiration vary among coexisting grasses, forbs, and shrubs in a tallgrass prairie? (2) What environmental variables drive Enight and do these differ from the drivers of Eday? (3)...

Data from: Landscape heterogeneity is key to forecasting outcomes of plant reintroduction

T. Trevor Caughlin, Ellen I. Damschen, Nick M. Haddad, Douglas J. Levey, Christopher Warneke & Lars A. Brudvig
Conservation and restoration projects often involve starting new populations by introducing individuals into portions of their native or projected range. Such efforts can help meet many related goals, including habitat creation, ecosystem service provisioning, assisted migration, and the reintroduction of imperiled species following local extirpation. The outcomes of reintroduction efforts, however, are highly variable, with results ranging from local extinction to dramatic population growth; reasons for this variation remain unclear. Here, we ask whether population...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    55

Affiliations

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    55
  • Michigan State University
    10
  • Northern Arizona University
    3
  • Iowa State University
    3
  • Columbia University
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • Texas A&M University
    2
  • McGill University
    2