94 Works

Evidence for hawkmoth pollination in the chiropterophilous African baobab (Adansonia digitata)

Nisa Karimi
Chiropterophily, or bat pollination, is typically considered a highly specialized pollination system that has evolved independently numerous times across the angiosperm phylogeny, with distinct lineages often converging on a similar suite of floral traits. The African baobab, Adansonia digitata, occurs widespread across continental Africa and introduced throughout much of the tropics, possesses floral traits classically associated with bat pollination, namely nocturnal anthesis, pendulous white flowers, and a “musky” fragrance. Despite this, our observations and pollination...

Two new sesquiterpenoid lactone derivatives from Lindera aggregata

Song-Song Wen, Yan Wang, Jia-Ping Xu, Qi Liu, Lei Zhang, Jing Zheng, Lin Li, Na Zhang, Xin Liu, Yu-Wen Xu & Zhen-Liang Sun
Two new sesquiterpenoid lactone derivatives, linderin A (1) and linderin B (2) comprising a sesquiterpenoid lactone and a methyl geranylhomogentisate moiety together with six known compounds were isolated from the roots of Lindera aggregata. Their chemical structures were elucidated using extensive spectroscopic analysis including 1 D, 2 D NMR, and HR-ESI-MS data and compared with previously reported data. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were assigned based on the electronic circular dichroism calculation. Compound...

Data for: Wolves make roadways safer, generating large economic returns to predator conservation

Jennifer Raynor, Corbett Grainger & Dominic Parker
This dataset includes information on deer-vehicle collisions, vehicle miles traveled, weather, and deer, wolf, and human populations, for counties in Wisconsin from 1981-2016.

Plastic responses to hot temperatures homogenize riparian leaf litter, speed decomposition, and reduce detritivores

Joann Jeplawy, Hillary Cooper, Jane Marks, Richard Lindroth, Morgan Andrews, Zacchaeus Compson, Catherine Gehring, Kevin Hultine, Kevin Grady, Thomas Whitham, Gerard Allan & Rebecca Best
Efforts to maintain the function of critical ecosystems under climate change often begin with foundation species. In the southwestern US, cottonwood trees support diverse communities in riparian ecosystems that are threatened by rising temperatures. Genetic variation within cottonwoods shapes communities and ecosystems, but these effects may be modified by phenotypic plasticity, where genotype traits change in response to environmental conditions. Here, we investigated plasticity in Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) leaf litter traits as well as...

Long noncoding RNA#45 exerts broad inhibitory effect on influenza a virus replication via its stem ring arms

Lei Zhang, Xinxin Zheng, Jun Li, Guoqing Wang, Zenglei Hu, Yu Chen, Xiaoquan Wang, Min Gu, Ruyi Gao, Shunlin Hu, Xiaowen Liu, Xinan Jiao, Daxin Peng, Jiao Hu & Xiufan Liu
A growing body of evidence suggests the pivotal role of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) in influenza virus infection. Based on next-generation sequencing, we previously demonstrated that Lnc45 was distinctively stimulated by H5N1 influenza virus in mice. In this study, we systematically investigated the specific role of Lnc45 during influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Through qRT-PCR, we first demonstrated that Lnc45 is highly up-regulated by different subtypes of IAV strains, including H5N1, H7N9, and H1N1 viruses....

Dataset for the study of Ultrafast energy transfer between lipid-linked chromophores and plant Light-Harvesting Complex II

Ashley Hancock, Minjung Son, Muath Nairat, Tiejun Wei, Lars Jeuken, Christopher Duffy, Gabriela Schlau-Cohen & Peter Adams
This dataset shows the raw data, analysed data and documentation related to figures and tables from the study “Ultrafast energy transfer between lipid-linked chromophores and plant Light-Harvesting Complex II". This includes: absorbance and fluorescence spectra; molecular dynamics images and associated files; calculations of excitation energy transfer; other graphical analyses; tabulated numerical data.

Data for: Perceived risk structures the space use of competing carnivores

Mauriel Rodriguez Curras, Emiliano Donadio, Arthur Middleton & Jonathan Pauli
Competition structures ecological communities. In carnivorans, competitive interactions are disproportionately costly to subordinate carnivores who must account for risk of interspecific killing when foraging. Accordingly, missed opportunity costs for meso-carnivores imposed by risk can benefit the smallest-bodied competitors. However, the extent to which the risk perpetuates into spatial partitioning in hierarchically structured communities remains unknown. To determine how risk-avoidance behaviors shape the space-use of carnivore communities, we studied a simple community of carnivores in northern...

Data to support publication figures and animation scripts at GitHub: Modeling weather-driven long-distance dispersal of spruce budworm moths (Choristoneura fumiferana)

Matthew Garcia, Brian R. Sturtevant, Remi Saint-Amant, Joseph J. Charney, Johanne Delisle, Yan Boulanger, Philip A. Townsend & Jacques Régnière
Long-term studies of insect populations in the North American boreal forest have shown the vital importance of long-distance dispersal to the maintenance and expansion of insect outbreaks. In this work, we extend several concepts established previously in an empirically-based dispersal flight model with recent work on the physiology and behavior of the adult eastern spruce budworm (SBW) moth, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.). An outbreak of defoliating SBW in Quebec, ongoing since the mid-2000s, already covers millions...

Evidence for niche conservatism in alpine beetles under a climate-driven species pump model

Jillian Schat, Yi-Ming Weng, Roman Dudko, David Kavanaugh, Lan Luo & Sean Schoville
Aim Past glacial climate cycles have generated lineage diversity in alpine habitats, acting as a climate-driven species pump. It is not clear how much this process contributes to ecological diversification of alpine species. To examine this problem, we test patterns of genetic and phenotypic divergence in two co-distributed species complexes of flightless alpine ground beetles. Greater differentiation in ecologically-important functional traits would indicate that ecological selection is an outcome of oscillating climate change, whereas greater...

Value Function Guided Subgroup Identification via Gradient Tree Boosting: A Framework to Handle Multiple Outcomes for Optimal Treatment Recommendation

Pingye Zhang, Peng Liu, Junshui Ma & Yue Shentu
In randomized clinical trials, there has been an increasing interest in identifying subgroups with heterogeneous responses to study treatment based on baseline patient characteristics. Even though the benefit risk assessment of any patient population or subgroups is almost always a multi-facet consideration, the statistical literature of subgroup identification has largely been limited to a single clinical outcome. In the article, we propose a nonparametric method that searches for subgroup membership scores by maximizing a value...

Taxonomic sampling and rare genomic changes overcome long-branch attraction in the phylogenetic placement of pseudoscorpions

Andrew Ontano, Guilherme Gainett, Shlomi Aharon, Jesús Balesteros, Ligia Benavides, Kevin Corbett, Efrat Gavish-Regev, Mark Harvey, Scott Monsma, Carlos Santibáñez-López, Emily Setton, Jakob Zehms, Jeanne Zeh, David Zeh & Prashant Sharma
Long-branch attraction is a systematic artifact that results in erroneous groupings of fast-evolving taxa. The combination of short, deep internodes in tandem with LBA artifacts has produced empirically intractable parts of the Tree of Life. One such group is the arthropod subphylum Chelicerata, whose backbone phylogeny has remained unstable despite improvements in phylogenetic methods and genome-scale datasets. Pseudoscorpion placement is particularly variable across datasets and analytical frameworks, with this group either clustering with other long-branch...

Serological dataset and R code for: Patterns and processes of pathogen exposure in gray wolves across North America

Ellen E Brandell
The presence of many pathogens varies in a predictable manner with latitude, with infections decreasing from the equator towards the poles. We investigated the geographic trends of pathogens infecting a widely distributed carnivore: the gray wolf (Canis lupus). We compiled a large serological dataset of nearly 2000 wolves from 17 study areas, spanning 80º longitude and 50º latitude. Generalized linear mixed models were constructed to predict the probability of seropositivity of four important viruses: canine...

Maternal and neonatal outcomes of repeated antepartum bleeding in 493 placenta previa cases: a retrospective study

Shiyun Huang, Qing Zuo, Tianjun Wang, Xiaotong Tang, Zhiping Ge, Hongmei Lu, Xin Zhou & Ziyan Jiang
To explore the effect of antepartum bleeding caused by PP on pregnancy outcomes. We retrospectively analyzed 493 pregnant women complicated with PP. Patients were divided into antepartum repeated bleeding and non-bleeding groups. Maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were compared. The risk of antepartum hemorrhage was 2.038 times higher when gravidity was 5 (95% CI 1.104–3.760, p = .023). Pregnant women with a history of more than three intrauterine procedures had a 1.968 times higher risk...

Mesophyll photosynthetic sensitivity to leaf water potential in Eucalyptus: A new dimension of plant adaptation to native moisture supply

Amanda Salvi, Duncan Smith, Mark Adams, Katherine McCulloh & Thomas J. Givnish
Photosynthetic sensitivity to drought is a fundamental constraint on land-plant evolution and ecosystem function. However, little is known about how the sensitivity of photosynthesis to non-stomatal limitations varies among species in the context of phylogenetic relationships. Using saplings of 10 Eucalyptus species, we measured maximum CO2-saturated photosynthesis using A-ci curves at several different leaf water potentials (PSIleaf) to quantify mesophyll photosynthetic sensitivity to PSIleaf (MPS), a measure of how rapidly non-stomatal limitations to carbon uptake...

Disease or drought: Environmental fluctuations release zebra from a potential pathogen-triggered ecological trap

Yen-Hua Huang, Hendrina Joel, Martina Küsters, Zoe Barandongo, Claudine Cloete, Axel Hartmann, Pauline Kamath, Werner Kilian, John Mfune, Gabriel Shatumbu, Royi Zidon, Wayne Getz & Wendy Turner
When a transmission hotspot for an environmentally persistent pathogen establishes in otherwise high-quality habitat, the disease may exert a strong impact on a host population. However, fluctuating environmental conditions lead to heterogeneity in habitat quality and animal habitat preference, which may interrupt the overlap between selected and risky habitats. We evaluated spatiotemporal patterns in anthrax mortalities in a plains zebra (Equus quagga) population in Etosha National Park, Namibia, incorporating remote-sensing and host telemetry data. A...

Terrestrial lichen data for Saskatchewan, Canada

Jill Johnstone, Ruth Greuel, Sarah Hart, Alexandre Truchon-Savard & Philip McLoughlin
Increased fire activity due to climate change may impact the successional dynamics of boreal forests, with important consequences for caribou habitat. Early successional forests have been shown to support lower quantities of caribou forage lichens, but geographic variation in, and controls on, the rates of lichen recovery have been largely unexplored. In this study, we sampled across a broad region in northwestern Canada to compare lichen biomass accumulation in ecoprovinces, including the Saskatchewan Boreal Shield,...

Long non-coding RNA RP11-283G6.5 confines breast cancer development through modulating miR-188-3p/TMED3/Wnt/β-catenin signalling

Jing Pei, Shengquan Zhang, Xiaowei Yang, Chunguang Han, Yubo Pan, Jun Li, Zhaorui Wang, Chenyu Sun & Jing Zhang
The contributions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) to breast cancer are critical areas of investigation. In this study, we identified a novel lncRNA RP11-283G6.5 which was lowly expressed in breast cancer and whose low expression was correlated with poor overall survival and disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Functional experiments revealed that ectopic expression of RP11-283G6.5 confined breast cancer cellular growth, migration, and invasion, and promoted cellular apoptosis. Conversely, RP11-283G6.5 silencing facilitated...

MicroRNA quantitative RT-PCR analysis of CMT1A Plasma

John Svaren, Hongge Wang, Matthew Davison & Michael Shy
Objective: To determine if microRNA’s (miR) are elevated in the plasma of individuals affected by the inherited peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, type 1A (CMT1A), miR profiling was employed to compare control and CMT1A plasma. Methods: We undertook a screen of CMT1A and control plasma samples to identify miRs that are elevated in CMT1A using a pilot screen of plasma miR by next generation sequencing, followed by validation of selected miRs by quantitative PCR, and correlation...

Arresting the spread of invasive species in continental systems

Daniel Hofstadter, Nicholas Kryshak, Connor Wood, Brian Dotters, Kevin Roberts, Kevin Kelly, John Keane, Sarah Sawyer, Paula Shaklee, Anu Kramer, Rocky Gutiérrez & Zach Peery
Invasive species are a primary threat to biodiversity and are challenging to manage once populations become established. But removing them is further complicated when invasions occur in continental, mixed-ownership systems. We demonstrate a rare conservation success: the regional-scale removal of an invasive predator – the barred owl (Strix varia) – to benefit the spotted owl (S. occidentalis) in California, USA. Barred owl site occupancy declined six-fold from 0.19 to 0.03 following one year of removals,...

Code for: A metapopulation model of social group dynamics and disease applied to Yellowstone wolves

Ellen E. Brandell
Abstract The population structure of social species has important consequences for both their demography and transmission of their pathogens. We develop a new form of metapopulation model that tracks two key components of a species’ social system: average group size and number of groups within a population. While the model is general, we parameterize it to mimic the dynamics of the Yellowstone wolf population and two associated pathogens: sarcoptic mange and canine distemper. In the...

Biometric conversion factors as a unifying platform for comparative assessment of invasive freshwater bivalves

Neil Coughlan, Eoghan Cunningham, Ross Cuthbert, Patrick Joyce, Pedro Anastacio, Filipe Banha, Nicolás Bonel, Stephanie Bradbeer, Elizabeta Briski, Vincent Butitta, Zuzana Čadková, Jaimie Dick, Karel Douda, Lawrence Eagling, Noé Ferreira-Rodríguez, Leandro Hünicken, Mattias Johansson, Louise Kregting, Anna Labecka, Deliang Li, Florencia Liquin, Jonathan Marescaux, Todd Morris, Patrycja Nowakowska, Małgorzata Ożgo … & Francisco Sylvester
1. Invasive bivalves continue to spread and negatively impact freshwater ecosystems worldwide. As different metrics for body size and biomass are frequently used within the literature to standardise bivalve related ecological impacts (e.g. respiration and filtration rates), the lack of broadly applicable conversion equations currently hinders reliable comparison across bivalve populations. To facilitate improved comparative assessment amongst studies originating from disparate geographic locations, we report body size and biomass conversion equations for six invasive freshwater...

Hierarchical genetic structure and implications for conservation of the world’s largest salmonid, Hucho taimen

Lanie M. Galland, James B. Simmons, Joshua P. Jahner, Agusto R. Luzuriaga-Neira, Matthew R. Sloat, Sudeep Chandra, Zeb Hogan, Olaf P. Jensen & Thomas L. Parchman
Population genetic analyses can evaluate how evolutionary processes shape diversity and inform conservation and management of imperiled species. Taimen (Hucho taimen), the world’s largest freshwater salmonid, is threatened, endangered, or extirpated across much of its range due to anthropogenic activity including overfishing and habitat degradation. We generated genetic data using high throughput sequencing of reduced representation libraries for taimen from multiple drainages in Mongolia and Russia. Nucleotide diversity estimates were within the range documented in...

High rates of anticoagulant rodenticide exposure in California Barred Owls

Daniel Hofstadter
Pesticide use is pervasive and the exposure of non-target wildlife has been well documented over the past half century. Among pesticides, anticoagulant rodenticides (AR) have emerged as a particularly important threat in forests of the western United States, with exposure and mortality reported for several species of conservation concern. To further quantify this threat, we collected specimens of Barred Owls (Strix varia) and Barred Owl x Spotted Owl hybrids from the Klamath and Cascade Mountains...

Nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA distribution responsible for maintaining neuroinflammatory microenvironment

Yuyan Liao, Chenghao Kuang, Zheng Bao, Yijing He, Long Gu, Qianke Tao, Xiancheng Qiu, Ghosh Dipritu, Xi Kong, Lifang Zhang, Jianhua Peng, Yong Jiang & Shigang Yin
Subcellular localization of transcripts is highly associated with regulation of gene expression, synthesis of protein, and also the development of the human brain cortex. Although many mechanisms are prevalent in the occurrence of neuroinflammation, the mechanisms based on differences in subcellular localization of transcripts have not been explored. To characterize the dynamic profile of nuclear and cytoplasmic transcripts during the progress of haemorrhage-induced neuroinflammation, we isolated nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA fractions of oxyhaemoglobin (oxy-Hb) treated microglia cells...

Selection on convergent functional traits drives compositional divergence in a tallgrass prairie restoration experiment

Nisa Karimi & Andrew Hipp
1. Plant biodiversity is often partitioned into taxonomic diversity (species composition and abundance), phylogenetic diversity (breadth of evolutionary lineages) and functional diversity (resource‐use strategies or physical traits). Evaluating the effects and interplay of these dimensions can provide insights into how assembly processes drive compositional changes in plant communities. However, teasing apart the effects of different biodiversity dimensions is challenging in observational studies or retrospective analyses. 2. To evaluate how plant phylogenetic and trait history shape...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    94

Resource Types

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    15

Affiliations

  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    58
  • University of Wisconsin–Madison
    45
  • Southern Medical University
    15
  • Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College
    13
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    11
  • Capital Medical University
    11
  • First Affiliated Hospital of Hebei Medical University
    11
  • West China Hospital of Sichuan University
    9
  • Zhejiang University
    8
  • Sichuan University
    8