3 Works

Data from: Host and parasite thermal acclimation responses depend on the stage of infection

Karie A. Altman, Sara H. Paull, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Michelle N. Golembieski, Jeffrey P. Stephens, Bryan E. LaFonte & Thomas R. Raffel
1. Global climate change is expected to alter patterns of temperature variability, which could influence species interactions including parasitism. Species interactions can be difficult to predict in variable-temperature environments because of thermal acclimation responses, i.e. physiological changes that allow organisms to adjust to a new temperature following a temperature shift. 2. The goal of this study was to determine how thermal acclimation influences host resistance to infection and to test for parasite acclimation responses, which...

Data from: Bottom-up and trait-mediated effects of resource quality on amphibian parasitism

Jeffrey P. Stephens, Karie A. Altman, Keith A. Berven, Scott D. Tiegs & Thomas R. Raffel
Leaf litter subsidies are important resources for aquatic consumers like tadpoles and snails, causing bottom-up effects on wetland ecosystems. Recent studies have shown that variation in litter nutritional quality can be as important as litter quantity in driving these bottom-up effects. Resource subsidies likely also have indirect and trait-mediated effects on predation and parasitism, but these potential effects remain largely unexplored. We generated predictions for differential effects of litter nutrition and secondary polyphenolic compounds on...

Data from: Sexual selection on male vocal fundamental frequency in humans and other anthropoids

David A. Puts, Alexander K. Hill, Drew H. Bailey, Robert S. Walker, Drew Rendall, John R. Wheatley, Lisa L. M. Welling, Khytam Dawood, Rodrigo A. Cárdenas, Robert P. Burriss, Nina G. Jablonski, Mark D. Shriver, Daniel J. Weiss, Adriano R. Lameira, Coren L. Apicella, Michael J. Owren, Claudia Barelli, Mary E. Glenn & Gabriel Ramos-Fernandez
In many primates, including humans, the vocalizations of males and females differ dramatically, with male vocalizations and vocal anatomy often seeming to exaggerate apparent body size. These traits may be favoured by sexual selection because low-frequency male vocalizations intimidate rivals and/or attract females, but this hypothesis has not been systematically tested across primates, nor is it clear why competitors and potential mates should attend to vocalization frequencies. Here we show across anthropoids that sexual dimorphism...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Oakland University
    3
  • Museo delle Scienze
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1
  • Humboldt State University
    1
  • University of Colorado Boulder
    1
  • University of Missouri
    1
  • Emory University
    1
  • University of Lethbridge
    1
  • Northumbria University
    1
  • University of Amsterdam
    1