13 Works

Data from: Nitrogen fertilization, not water addition, alters plant phylogenetic community structure in a semi-arid steppe

Xian Yang, Zhongling Yang, Jiaqi Tan, Guoyong Li, Shiqiang Wan & Lin Jiang
1. Anthropogenic environmental changes, such as nitrogen (N) enrichment and alteration in precipitation regimes, significantly influence ecosystems worldwide. However, we know little about whether and how these changes alter the phylogenetic properties of ecological communities. 2. Based on a seven-year field experiment in the temperate semi-arid steppe of Inner Mongolia, China, we investigated the influence of increased N and precipitation on plant phylogenetic structure and phylogenetic patterns of species colonization and extinction. 3. Our study...

Data from: Species ecological similarity modulates the importance of colonization history for adaptive radiation

Jiaqi Tan, Xian Yang & Lin Jiang
Adaptive radiation is an important evolutionary process, through which a single ancestral lineage rapidly gives rise to multiple newly formed lineages that specialize in different niches. In the first-arrival hypothesis, David Lack emphasized the importance of species colonization history for adaptive radiation, suggesting that the earlier arrival of a diversifying species would allow it to radiate to a greater extent. Here, we report on the first rigorous experimental test of this hypothesis, using the rapidly...

Data from: Mechanical evidence that flamingos can support their body on one leg with little active muscular force

Young-Hui Chang & Lena H. Ting
Flamingos (Phoenicopteridae) often stand and sleep on one leg for long periods, but it is unknown how much active muscle contractile force they use for the mechanical demands of standing on one leg: body weight support and maintaining balance. First, we demonstrated that flamingo cadavers could passively support body weight on one leg without any muscle activity while adopting a stable, unchanging, joint posture resembling that seen in live flamingos. By contrast, the cadaveric flamingo...

Data from: The route of infection determines Wolbachia antibacterial protection in Drosophila

Vanika Gupta, Radhakrishnan B. Vasanthakrishnan, Jonathon Siva-Jothy, Katy M. Monteith, Sam P. Brown & Pedro F. Vale
Bacterial symbionts are widespread among metazoans and provide a range of beneficial functions. Wolbachia-mediated protection against viral infection has been extensively demonstrated in Drosophila. In mosquitoes that are artificially transinfected with Drosophila melanogaster Wolbachia (wMel), protection from both viral and bacterial infections has been demonstrated. However, no evidence for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection has been demonstrated in Drosophila to date. Here, we show that the route of infection is key for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection. Drosophila melanogaster...

Data from: Gene duplication and the evolution of phenotypic diversity in insect societies

Linh M. Chau & Michael A. D. Goodisman
Gene duplication is an important evolutionary process thought to facilitate the evolution of phenotypic diversity. We investigated if gene duplication was associated with the evolution of phenotypic differences in a highly social insect, the honeybee Apis mellifera. We hypothesized that the genetic redundancy provided by gene duplication could promote the evolution of social and sexual phenotypes associated with advanced societies. We found a positive correlation between sociality and rate of gene duplications across the Apoidea,...

Data from: Repeated evolution and reversibility of self-fertilization in the volvocine green algae

Erik R. Hanschen, Matthew D. Herron, John J. Wiens, Hisayoshi Nozaki & Richard E. Michod
Outcrossing and self-fertilization are fundamental strategies of sexual reproduction, each with different evolutionary costs and benefits. Self-fertilization is thought to be an evolutionary “dead-end” strategy, beneficial in the short term but costly in the long term, resulting in self-fertilizing species that occupy only the tips of phylogenetic trees. Here, we use volvocine green algae to investigate the evolution of self-fertilization. We use ancestral-state reconstructions to show that self-fertilization has repeatedly evolved from outcrossing ancestors and...

Data from: De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes

Valeria A. Risso, Sergio Martinez Rodriguez, Adela M. Candel, Dennis M. Krüger, David Pantoja-Uceda, Mariano Ortega-Munoz, Francisco Santoyo-Gonzalez, Eric A. Gaucher, Shina Caroline Lynn Kamerlin, Marta Bruix, Jose A. Gavira & Jose M. Sanchez-Ruiz
Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated...

Data from: Long-term antagonistic effect of increased precipitation and nitrogen addition on soil respiration in a semiarid steppe

Hongyan Han, Yue Du, Dafeng Hui, Lin Jiang, Mingxing Zhong & Shiqiang Wan
Changes in water and nitrogen (N) availability due to climate change and atmospheric N deposition could have significant effects on soil respiration, a major pathway of carbon (C) loss from terrestrial ecosystems. A manipulative experiment simulating increased precipitation and atmospheric N deposition has been conducted for 9 years (2005–2013) in a semiarid grassland in Mongolian Plateau, China. Increased precipitation and N addition interactively affect soil respiration through the 9 years. The interactions demonstrated that N...

Data from: Scale dependence of the diversity–stability relationship in a temperate grassland

Yunhai Zhang, Nianpeng He, Michel Loreau, Qingmin Pan & Xingguo Han
1. A positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem stability has been reported in many ecosystems; however, it has yet to be determined whether and how spatial scale affects this relationship. Here, for the first time, we assessed the effects of alpha, beta and gamma diversity on ecosystem stability and the scale dependence of the slope of the diversity–stability relationship. 2. By employing a long-term (33 years) dataset from a temperate grassland, northern China, we calculated...

Data from: Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

Gang Kevin Li, Jin Shang, Qinfen Gu, Rohan V. Awati, Nathan Jensen, Andrew Grant, Xueying Zhang, David S. Sholl, Jefferson Z. Liu, Paul A. Webley & Eric F. May
While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group’s thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is...

Data from: Spatial storage effect promotes biodiversity during adaptive radiation

Jiaqi Tan, Jennifer B. Rattray, Xian Yang & Lin Jiang
Many ecological communities are enormously diverse. Variation in environmental conditions over time and space provides opportunities for temporal and spatial storage effects to operate, potentially promoting species coexistence and biodiversity. While several studies have provided empirical evidence supporting the significance of the temporal storage effect for coexistence, empirical tests of the role of the spatial storage effect are rare. In particular, we know little about how the spatial storage effect contributes to biodiversity over evolutionary...

Data from: Species colonisation, not competitive exclusion, drives community overdispersion over long-term succession

Shao-Peng Li, Marc W. Cadotte, Scott J. Meiners, Zheng-Shuang Hua, Lin Jiang & Wen-Sheng Shu
Ecological communities often transition from phylogenetic and functional clustering to overdispersion over succession as judged by space-for-time substitution studies. Such a pattern has been generally attributed to the increase in competitive exclusion of closely related species with similar traits through time, although colonisation and extinction have rarely been examined. Using 44 years of uninterrupted old-field succession in New Jersey, USA, we confirmed that phylogenetic and functional clustering decreased as succession unfolded, but the transition was...

Data from: Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle

Kyle P. Blum, Boris Lamotte D’Incamps, Daniel Zytnicki & Lena H. Ting
Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    13

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    13

Affiliations

  • Georgia Institute of Technology
    13
  • Henan University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
    2
  • Emory University
    2
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    1
  • Aarhus University
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • Tennessee State University
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1