14 Works

Data from: Sexual imprinting: What strategies should we expect to see in nature?

Hayes Griffin, Robert Tucker Gilman & Dalton W. Chaffee
Sexual imprinting occurs when juveniles learn mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations, and it is ubiquitous in nature. Imprinting strategies, that is which individuals and phenotypes are observed and how strong preferences become, vary among species. Imprinting can affect trait evolution and the probability of speciation, and different imprinting strategies are expected to have different effects. However, little is known about how and why different imprinting strategies evolve, or...

Data from: The effects of insects, nutrients, and plant invasion on community structure and function above- and belowground

Phoebe Wright, Melissa A. Cregger, Lara Souza, Nathan J. Sanders & Aimée T. Classen
Soil nutrient availability, invasive plants, and insect presence can directly alter ecosystem structure and function, but less is known about how these factors may interact. In this 6-year study in an old-field ecosystem, we manipulated insect abundance (reduced and control), the propagule pressure of an invasive nitrogen-fixing plant (propagules added and control), and soil nutrient availability (nitrogen added, nitrogen reduced and control) in a fully crossed, completely randomized plot design. We found that nutrient amendment...

Data from: Environmental and historical imprints on beta diversity: insights from variation in rates of species turnover along gradients

Matthew C. Fitzpatrick, Nathan J. Sanders, Signe Normand, Jens-Christian Svenning, Simon Ferrier, Aaron D. Gove, Robert R. Dunn, N. J. Sanders, S. Normand, R. R. Dunn, J.-C. Svenning, A. D. Gove & S. Ferrier
A common approach for analysing geographical variation in biodiversity involves using linear models to determine the rate at which species similarity declines with geographical or environmental distance and comparing this rate among regions, taxa or communities. Implicit in this approach are weakly justified assumptions that the rate of species turnover remains constant along gradients and that this rate can therefore serve as a means to compare ecological systems. We use generalized dissimilarity modelling, a novel...

Data from: Phylogenetic relationships and character evolution analysis of Saxifragales using a supermatrix approach

Douglas E. Soltis, Mark E. Mort, Maribeth Latvis, Evgeny V. Mavrodiev, Brian C. O'Meara, Pamela S. Soltis, J. Gordon Burleigh & Rafael Rubio De Casas
Premise of the study: We sought novel evolutionary insights for the highly diverse Saxifragales by constructing a large phylogenetic tree encompassing 36.8% of the species-level biodiversity. Methods: We built a phylogenetic tree for 909 species of Saxifragales and used this hypothesis to examine character evolution for: annual or perennial habit, woody or herbaceous habit, ovary position, petal number, carpel number, and stamen: petal ratio. We employed likelihood approaches to investigate the effect of habit and...

Data from: Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes

Thomas J. Near, Alex Dornburg, Ron I. Eytan, Benjamin P. Keck, W. Leo Smith, Kristen L. Kuhn, Jon A. Moore, Samantha A. Price, Frank T. Burbrink, Matt Friedman & Peter C. Wainwright
Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorph diversification is poorly understood. We investigate the pattern of lineage diversification in acanthomorphs by using a well-resolved time-calibrated phylogeny inferred from a nuclear gene supermatrix that includes 520 acanthomorph species and 37 fossil age constraints. This phylogeny provides resolution for what has been classically referred to as the “bush at...

Data from: Molecular and fossil evidence place the origin of cichlid fishes long after Gondwanan rifting

Matt Friedman, Benjamin P. Keck, Alex Dornburg, Ron I. Eytan, Christopher H. Martin, C. Darrin Hulsey, Peter C. Wainwright & Thomas J. Near
Cichlid fishes are a key model system in the study of adaptive radiation, speciation and evolutionary developmental biology. More than 1600 cichlid species inhabit freshwater and marginal marine environments across several southern landmasses. This distributional pattern, combined with parallels between cichlid phylogeny and sequences of Mesozoic continental rifting, has led to the widely accepted hypothesis that cichlids are an ancient group whose major biogeographic patterns arose from Gondwanan vicariance. Although the Early Cretaceous (ca 135...

Data from: Effects of diet on resource utilization by a model human gut microbiota containing Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, a symbiont with an extensive glycobiome

Nathan P. McNulty, Wu Meng, Alison R. Erickson, Chongle Pan, Brian K. Erickson, Eric C. Martens, Nicholas A. Pudlo, Brian D. Muegge, Bernard Henrissat, Robert L. Hettich, Jeffrey I. Gordon & Meng Wu
The human gut microbiota is an important metabolic organ. However, little is known about how its individual species interact, establish dominant positions, and respond to changes in environmental factors such as diet. In the current study, gnotobiotic mice colonized with a simplified model microbiota composed of 12 sequenced human gut bacterial species were fed oscillating diets of disparate composition. Rapid, reproducible and reversible changes in community structure were observed. Time series microbial RNA-Seq analyses revealed...

Data from: Male mealworm beetles increase resting metabolic rate under terminal investment

Indrikis A. Krams, Tatjana Krama, Fhionna R. Moore, Inese Kivleniece, Aare Kuusik, Todd M. Freeberg, Raivo Mänd, M. J. Rantala, Janina Daukšte & Marika Mänd
Harmful parasite infestation can cause energetically costly behavioural and immunological responses, with the potential to reduce host fitness and survival. It has been hypothesized that the energetic costs of infection cause resting metabolic rate (RMR) to increase. Furthermore, under terminal investment theory, individuals exposed to pathogens should allocate resources to current reproduction when life expectancy is reduced, instead of concentrating resources on an immune defence. In this study, we activated the immune system of Tenebrio...

Data from: Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects

Elizabeth G. Pringle, Erol Akçay, Ted K. Raab, Rodolfo Dirzo & Deborah M. Gordon
Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant–plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant–plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites...

Data from: Evolution and spread of glyphosate resistance in Conyza canadensis in California

Miki Okada, Bradley D. Hanson, Kurt J. Hembree, Yanhui Peng, Anil Shrestha, , Steven D. Wright, Marie Jasieniuk & Charles Neal Stewart
Recent increases in glyphosate use in perennial crops of California, USA, are hypothesized to have led to an increase in selection and evolution of resistance to the herbicide in Conyza canadensis populations. To gain insight into the evolutionary origins and spread of resistance and to inform glyphosate resistance management strategies, we investigated the geographical distribution of glyphosate resistance in C. canadensis across and surrounding the Central Valley, its spatial relationship to groundwater protection areas (GWPA),...

Data from: Convergent effects of elevation on functional leaf traits within and among species

Quentin D. Read, Leigh C. Moorhead, Nathan G. Swenson, Joseph K. Bailey & Nathan J. Sanders
1.Spatial variation in filters imposed by the abiotic environment causes variation in functional traits within and among plant species. This is abundantly clear for plant species along elevational gradients, where parallel abiotic selection pressures give rise to predictable variation in leaf phenotypes among ecosystems. Understanding the factors responsible for such patterns may provide insight into the current and future drivers of biodiversity, local community structure, and ecosystem function. 2.In order to explore patterns in trait...

Data from: Explicit tests of paleodrainage connections of southeastern North America and the historical biogeography of Orangethroat Darters (Percidae: Etheostoma: Ceasia)

Christen M. Bossu, Jeremy M. Beaulieu, Patrick A. Ceas & Thomas J. Near
The alteration of paleodrainage river connections has shaped patterns of speciation, genetic diversity, and the geographic distribution of the species-rich freshwater fauna of North America. The integration of ancestral range reconstruction methods and divergence time estimates provides an opportunity to infer paleodrainage connectivity and test alternative paleodrainage hypotheses. Members of the Orangethroat Darter clade, Ceasia, are endemic to southeastern North America and occur north and south of the Pleistocene glacial front, a distributional pattern that...

Data from: A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: Design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species

Armando Geraldes, Steve P. DiFazio, Gancho T. Slavov, Priya Ranjan, Wellington Muchero, Jan Hannemann, Lee E. Gunter, Ann M. Wymore, Christopher J. Grassa, Nima Farzaneh, Ilga Porth, Athena D. Mckown, Oleksandr Skyba, Eryang Li, Miki Fujita, Jaroslav Klápště, Joel Martin, Wendy Schackwitz, Christa Pennacchio, Daniel Rokhsar, Michael C. Friedmann, Geoffrey O. Wasteneys, Robert D. Guy, Yousry A. El-Kassaby, Shawn D. Mansfield … & Gerald A. Tuskan
Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. For such studies, the use of large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution. Herein we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species latitudinal range. We adopted a...

Data from: Three keys to the radiation of angiosperms into freezing environments

Amy E. Zanne, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell, Jonathan M. Eastman, Stephen A. Smith, Richard G. FitzJohn, Daniel J. McGlinn, Brian C. O'Meara, Angela T. Moles, Peter B. Reich, Dana L. Royer, Douglas E. Soltis, Peter F. Stevens, Mark Westoby, Ian J. Wright, Lonnie Aarssen, Robert I. Bertin, Andre Calaminus, Rafaël Govaerts, Frank Hemmings, Michelle R. Leishman, Jacek Oleksyn, Pamela S. Soltis, Nathan G. Swenson, Laura Warman … & Alejandro Ordonez
Early flowering plants are thought to have been woody species restricted to warm habitats1, 2, 3. This lineage has since radiated into almost every climate, with manifold growth forms4. As angiosperms spread and climate changed, they evolved mechanisms to cope with episodic freezing. To explore the evolution of traits underpinning the ability to persist in freezing conditions, we assembled a large species-level database of growth habit (woody or herbaceous; 49,064 species), as well as leaf...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    14
  • Yale University
    3
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    2
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • National Evolutionary Synthesis Center
    1
  • Institute of Food Safety, Animal Health and Environment “BIOR”
    1