24 Works

Data from: Two additional species of Gymnopus (Eugarics, Basidiomycotina)

Ronald Petersen, Karen Hughes, Ronald H. Petersen & Karen W. Hughes
For more than a decade, a combination of molecular phylogenetic analyses and morphological characterization have led to a renovation of the Omphalotaceae, especially of Gymnopus sensu lato. Numerous new genera have been proposed, but Gymnopus sensu stricto has also seen an accretion of species and species complexes. In this manuscript, two species are added to Gymnopus sensu stricto within Section Androsacei.

Data from: Feeding ecology underlies the evolution of cichlid jaw mobility

Christopher M. Martinez, Matthew David McGee, Samuel Robert Borstein & Peter C. Wainwright
The fish feeding apparatus is among the most diverse functional systems in vertebrates. While morphological and mechanical variation of feeding systems are well studied, we know far less about the diversity of the motions that they produce. We explored patterns of feeding movements in African cichlids from Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika, asking whether the degree of kinesis is associated with dietary habits of species. We used geometric morphometrics to measure feeding kinesis as trajectories of...

Data from: Length, body depth, and gape relationships and inference on piscivory among North American centrarchids

Anthony V. Fernando, Kyler B. Hecke & Michael A. Eggleton
Species of Centrarchidae are major components of inland fisheries in much of North America. Thus, information gained from the assessment of interspecies interactions and/or quantifying predator-prey relationships is a useful tool for fisheries managers. Using preserved fish specimens (n = 717) from 20 species of centrarchids, we made measurements of total length (TL), standard length (SL), horizontal gape, and body depth for each individual. We fitted mathematical models that included horizontal gape and body depth...

Data from: Relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence

Ylva Lekberg, James D. Bever, Rebecca A. Bunn, Ray M. Callaway, Miranda M. Hart, Stephanie N. Kivlin, John Klironomos, Beau G. Larkin, John L. Maron, Kurt O. Reinhart, Michael Remke, Wim H. Van Der Putten & Ragan M. Callaway
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition versus plant soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil)...

Data from: Substantial differences in bias between single-digest and double-digest RAD-seq libraries: a case study

Sarah P. Flanagan & Adam G. Jones
The trade‐offs of using single‐digest vs. double‐digest restriction site‐associated DNA sequencing (RAD‐seq) protocols have been widely discussed. However, no direct empirical comparisons of the two methods have been conducted. Here, we sampled a single population of Gulf pipefish (Syngnathus scovelli) and genotyped 444 individuals using RAD‐seq. Sixty individuals were subjected to single‐digest RAD‐seq (sdRAD‐seq), and the remaining 384 individuals were genotyped using a double‐digest RAD‐seq (ddRAD‐seq) protocol. We analysed the resulting Illumina sequencing data and...

Data from: Diel rewiring and positive selection of ancient plant proteins enabled evolution of CAM photosynthesis in Agave

Hengfu Yin, Hao-Bo Guo, David J. Weston, Anne M. Borland, Priya Ranjan, Paul E. Abraham, Sara S. Jawdy, James Wachira, Gerald A. Tuskan, Timothy J. Tschaplinski, Stan D. Wullschleger, Hong Guo, Robert L. Hettich, Stephen Gross, Zhong Wang, Axel Visel & Xiaohan Yang
Background: Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) enhances plant water-use efficiency through an inverse day/night pattern of stomatal closure/opening that facilitates nocturnal CO2 uptake. CAM has evolved independently in over 35 plant lineages, accounting for ~ 6% of all higher plants. Agave species are highly heat- and drought-tolerant, and have been domesticated as model CAM crops for beverage, fiber, and biofuel production in semi-arid and arid regions. However, the genomic basis of evolutionary innovation of CAM in...

Data from: Overall seed dispersal effectiveness is lower in endemic Trillium species than in their widespread congeners

Chelsea Nicole Miller & Charles Kwit
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Comparing ecological attributes of endemic species with related, widespread species can reveal differences accounting for rarity. Forests of the southeastern US are home to many range-restricted endemic and widespread species of Trillium, a genus of ant-dispersed herbs. Evidence suggests that aspects of seed-related life history stages are often correlated with plant rarity, but few studies have tested whether the process of seed dispersal differs for endemic and widespread species. To address...

Data from: Acoustic adaptation to city noise through vocal learning by a songbird

Dana Lynn Moseley, Graham Earnest Derryberry, Jennifer Nicole Phillips, Julie Elizabeth Danner, Raymond Michael Danner, David Andrew Luther & Elizabeth Perrault Derryberry
Anthropogenic noise imposes novel selection pressures, especially on species that communicate acoustically. Many animals – including insects, frogs, whales, and birds – produce sounds at higher frequencies in areas with low-frequency noise pollution. Although there is support for animals changing their vocalizations in real time in response to noise (i.e., immediate flexibility), other evolutionary mechanisms for animals that learn their vocalizations remain largely unexplored. We hypothesize that cultural selection for signal structures less masked by...

Data from: Development and validation of a weather-based warning system to advise fungicide applications to control dollar spot on turfgrass

Damon L. Smith, James P. Kerns, Nathan R. Walker, Andrea F. Payne, Brandon Horvath, John C. Inguagiato, John E. Kaminski, Maria Tomaso-Peterson & Paul L. Koch
Dollar spot is one of the most common diseases of golf course turfgrass and numerous fungicide applications are often required to provide adequate control. Weather-based disease warning systems have been developed to more accurately time fungicide applications; however, they tend to be ineffective and are not currently in widespread use. The primary objective of this research was to develop a new weather-based disease warning system to more accurately advise fungicide applications to control dollar spot...

Data from: Intragenomic nuclear RNA variation in a cryptic Amanita taxon

Karen W. Hughes, Rodham E. Tulloss & Ronald H. Petersen
Amanita cf. lavendula collections in eastern North America, Mexico, and Costa Rica were found to consist of four cryptic taxa, one of which exhibited consistently unreadable nuclear rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (fungal barcode) sequences after ITS1 base 130. This taxon is designated here as Amanita cf. lavendula taxon 1. ITS sequences from dikaryotic basidiomata were cloned, but sequences recovered from cloning did not segregate into distinct haplotypes. Rather, there was a mix of haplotypes that varied among...

Data from: An evaluation of transferability of ecological niche models

Huijie Qiao, Xiao Feng, Luis E. Escobar, A. Townsend Peterson, Jorge Soberon, Gengping Zhu & Monica Papeș
Ecological niche modeling (ENM) is used widely to study species’ geographic distributions. ENM applications frequently involve transferring models calibrated with environmental data from one region to other regions or times that may include novel environmental conditions. When novel conditions are present, transferability implies extrapolation, whereas, in absence of such conditions, transferability is an interpolation step only. We evaluated transferability of models produced using 11 ENM algorithms from the perspective of interpolation and extrapolation in a...

Data from: Integrative identification of incipient lineages in Heuchera longiflora (Saxifragaceae)

Ryan F. Folk, Julian C. Ginori, Douglas E. Soltis & Aaron J. Floden
Following on emerging understanding of the diversification process, many recent workers have considered infraspecific taxa as valuable for formally recognizing incompletely speciated entities. The distinction between a species and an infraspecific taxon represents a fundamentally subjective weighting of evidence, yet this points further to the need for an evidential basis for these decisions. We explore these concepts in Heuchera longiflora (Saxifragaceae), which is morphologically variable and has a disjunct range across several physiographic provinces in...

Data from: Soil fungi underlie a phylogenetic pattern in plant growth responses to nitrogen enrichment

Rachel C. Wooliver, John K. Senior, Brad M. Potts, Michael E. Van Nuland, Joseph K. Bailey & Jennifer A. Schweitzer
1. Under increasing anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition, some plant species will thrive while others will not. Previous work has shown that plant phylogeny can predict these responses, and that interactions with mycorrhizal fungi are a mechanism that drives variation in plant responses to N enrichment. Yet, much of this work has ignored the roles of other root-associated fungi and whole soil fungal communities in driving these responses. 2. We tested whether soil fungi mediate responses...

Data from: Statistically testing the role of individual learning and decision-making in trapline foraging

Carolyn A. Ayers, Paul R. Armsworth & Berry J. Brosi
Trapline foraging, a behavior consisting of repeated visitation to spatially fixed resources in a predictable sequence, has been observed over diverse taxa and is important ecologically for efficient resource gathering. Despite this, few null models exist to test the significance of suspected traplines, particularly for studies interested in the role of individual decision-making in the formation of traplines versus the role of resource layouts and random movement patterns. Here we present a spatially explicit, individual-based...

Data from: The predictability of genomic changes underlying a recent host shift in Melissa blue butterflies

Samridhi Chaturvedi, Lauren K. Lucas, Chris C. Nice, James A. Fordyce, Matt L. Forister, Zachariah Gompert & Matthew L. Forister
Despite accumulating evidence that evolution can be predictable, studies quantifying the predictability of evolution remain rare. Here, we measured the predictability of genome-wide evolutionary changes associated with a recent host shift in the Melissa blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa). We asked whether and to what extent genome-wide patterns of evolutionary change in nature could be predicted (1) by comparisons among instances of repeated evolution, and (2) from SNP $\times$ performance associations in a lab experiment. We...

Data from: The origin of the odorant receptor gene family in insects

Philipp Brand, Hugh M. Robertson, Wei Lin, Ratnasri Pothula, William E. Klingeman, Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes & Brian R. Johnson
The origin of the insect odorant receptor (OR) gene family has been hypothesized to have coincided with the evolution of terrestriality in insects. Missbach et al. (2014) suggested that ORs instead evolved with an ancestral OR co-receptor (Orco) after the origin of terrestriality and the OR/Orco system is an adaptation to winged flight in insects. We investigated genomes of the Collembola, Diplura, Archaeognatha, Zygentoma, Odonata, and Ephemeroptera, and find ORs present in all insect genomes...

Data from: A re‐interpretation of the ambulacral system of Eumorphocystis (Blastozoa, Echinodermata) and its bearing on the evolution of early crinoids

Sarah L. Sheffield & Colin D. Sumrall
Recent debates over the evolutionary relationships of early echinoderms have relied heavily on morphological evidence from the feeding ambulacral system. Eumorphocystis, a Late Ordovician diploporitan, has been a focus in these debates because it bears ambulacral features that show strong morphological similarity to early crinoid arms. Undescribed and well‐preserved specimens of Eumorphocystis from the Bromide Formation (Oklahoma, USA) provide new data illustrating that composite arms supported by a radial plate that bear a triserial arrangement...

Data from: Vertical differentiation in tropical forest butterflies: a novel mechanism generating insect diversity?

Chris C. Nice, James A. Fordyce, Katherine L. Bell, Matthew L. Forister, Zachariah Gompert & Phil J. DeVries
Many tropical fruit-feeding nymphalid butterflies are associated with either the forest canopy or the understory, however, the exceptions offer insights into the origins of tropical diversity. As it occurs in both habitats of tropical forests in Ecuador and Peru, Archaeoprepona demophon is one such exception. We compared patterns of occurrence of A. demophon in the canopy and understory and population genomic variation for evidence of ecological and genetic differentiation between habitats. We found that butterfly...

Data from: Shifts to earlier selfing in sympatry may reduce costs of pollinator sharing

April M. Randle, Rachel B. Spigler & Susan Kalisz
Coexisting plant congeners often experience strong competition for resources. Competition for pollinators can result in direct fitness costs via reduced seed set or indirect costs via heterospecific pollen transfer (HPT), causing subsequent gamete loss and unfit hybrid offspring production. Autonomous selfing may alleviate these costs, but to preempt HPT, selfing should occur early, before opportunities for HPT occur (i.e. “preemptive selfing hypothesis”). We evaluated conditions for this hypothesis in Collinsia sister species, C. linearis and...

Data from: The Phylogeny of the Diploporita: a polyphyletic assemblage of blastozoan echinoderms

Sarah L. Sheffield & Colin D. Sumrall
The phylogenetic relationships of Paleozoic blastozoan echinoderms are poorly understood and many of the traditionally ascribed groups are likely polyphyletic. Diploporitans, those blastozoans with double pore (diplopore) respiratory structures, have never been placed within a rigorous phylogenetic framework and their highly variable morphologies suggest that they do not represent a natural clade. A maximum parsimony phylogenetic analysis, spanning a wide range of diploporitan and related taxa, indicates that diplopore-bearing blastozoans are a polyphyletic grouping and,...

Data from: Positive selection on sociobiological traits in invasive fire ants

Eyal Privman, Pnina Cohen, Amir B. Cohanim, Oksana Riba-Grognuz, DeWayne Shoemaker & Laurent Keller
The fire ant Solenopsis invicta and its close relatives are highly invasive. Enhanced social cooperation may facilitate invasiveness in these and other invasive ant species. We investigated whether invasiveness in Solenopsis fire ants was accompanied by positive selection on sociobiological traits by applying a phylogenomics approach to infer ancient selection, and a population genomics approach to infer recent and ongoing selection in both native and introduced S. invicta populations. A combination of whole-genome sequencing of...

Data from: Reef fish functional traits evolve fastest at trophic extremes

Samuel R. Borstein, James A. Fordyce, Brian C. O'Meara, Peter C. Wainwright & Matthew D. McGee
Trophic ecology is thought to exert a profound influence on biodiversity, but the specifics of the process are rarely examined at large spatial and evolutionary scales. We investigate how trophic position and diet breadth influence functional trait evolution in one of the most species-rich and complex vertebrate assemblages, coral reef fishes, within a large-scale phylogenetic framework. We show that, in contrast with established theory, functional traits evolve fastest in trophic specialists with narrow diet breadths...

Data from: A rangewide herbarium-derived dataset indicates high levels of gene flow in black cherry (Prunus serotina)

Lauren Konrade, Joey Shaw & James Beck
Aim: Isolation by Distance (IBD) is a genetic pattern in which populations geographically closer to one another are more genetically similar to each other than populations which are farther apart. Black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) (Rosaceae) is a forest tree species widespread in eastern North America, and found sporadically in the southwestern United States, Mexico, and Guatemala. IBD has been studied in relatively few North American plant taxa, and no study has rigorously sampled across...

Data from: Can we build it? Yes we can, but should we use it? Assessing the quality and value of a very large phylogeny of campanulid angiosperms

Jeremy M. Beaulieu & Brian C. O'Meara
The study of very large and very old clades holds the promise of greater insights into evolution across the tree of life. However, there has been a fair amount of criticism regarding the interpretations and quality of studies to date, with some suggesting that detailed studies carried out on smaller, tractable scales should be preferred over the increasingly grand syntheses of these data. Methods - We provided in detail our trials and tribulations of compiling...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    24
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • Utah State University
    2
  • University of Nevada Reno
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • University of South Florida
    2
  • Texas State University
    2
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1
  • University of Montana
    1