8 Works

Data from: Cohort variation in individual body mass dissipates with age in large herbivores

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Steve Albon, Steeve D. Côté, Joseph M. Craine, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Mathieu Garel, Phyllis Lee, Cynthia Moss, Daniel H. Nussey, Fanie Pelletier, Audun Stien & Torkild Tveraa
Environmental conditions experienced during early growth and development markedly shape phenotypic traits. Consequently, individuals of the same cohort may show similar life-history tactics throughout life. Conditions experienced later in life, however, could fine-tune these initial differences, either increasing (cumulative effect) or decreasing (compensatory effect) the magnitude of cohort variation with increasing age. Our novel comparative analysis that quantifies cohort variation in individual body size trajectories shows that initial cohort variation dissipates throughout life, and that...

Data from: Combining familiarity and landscape features helps break down the barriers between movements and home ranges in a non-territorial large herbivore

Pascal Marchand, Mathieu Garel, Gilles Bourgoin, Antoine Duparc, Dominique Dubray, Daniel Maillard & Anne Loison
Recent advances in animal ecology have enabled identification of certain mechanisms that lead to the emergence of territories and home ranges from movements considered as unbounded. Among them, memory and familiarity have been identified as key parameters in cognitive maps driving animal navigation, but have been only recently used in empirical analyses of animal movements. At the same time, the influence of landscape features on movements of numerous species and on space division in territorial...

Data from: On the evolutionary consequences of increasing litter size with multiple paternity in wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa)

Thibault Gayet, Sebastien Devillard, Marlène Gamelon, Serge Brandt, Ludovic Say & Eric Baubet
Understanding how some species may be able to evolve quickly enough to deal with anthropogenic pressure is of prime interest in evolutionary biology, conservation and management. Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) populations keep growing all over Europe despite increasing hunting pressure. In wild boar populations subject to male-selective harvesting, the initially described polygynous mating system may switch to a promiscuous/polyandrous one. Such a change in the mating system, where potentially more males sire a litter...

Data from: Evidence of reduced individual heterogeneity in adult survival of long-lived species

Guillaume Peron, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Christophe Barbraud, Christophe Bonenfant, Anne Charmantier, Rémi Choquet, Tim Coulson, Vladimir Grosbois, Anne Loison, GIlbert Marzolin, Norman Owen-Smtih, Déborah Pardo, Floriane Plard, Roger Pradel, Carole Toïgo, Olivier Gimenez & Norman Owen-Smith
The canalization hypothesis postulates that the rate at which trait variation generates variation in the average individual fitness in a population determines how buffered traits are against environmental and genetic factors. The ranking of a species on the slow-fast continuum – the covariation among life-history traits describing species-specific life cycles along a gradient going from a long life, slow maturity, and low annual reproductive output, to a short life, fast maturity, and high annual reproductive...

Data from: Patterns and correlates of claims for brown bear damage on a continental scale

Carlos Bautista, Javier Naves, Eloy Revilla, Néstor Fernández, Jörg Albrecht, Anne K. Scharf, Robin Rigg, Alexandros A. Karamanlidis, Klemen Jerina, Djuro Huber, Santiago Palazón, Raido Kont, Paolo Ciucci, Claudio Groff, Aleksandar Dutsov, Juan Seijas, Pierre-Ives Quenette, Agnieszka Olszańska, Maryna Shkvyria, Michal Adamec, Janis Ozolins, Marko Jonozovič & Nuria Selva
Wildlife damage to human property threatens human–wildlife coexistence. Conflicts arising from wildlife damage in intensively managed landscapes often undermine conservation efforts, making damage mitigation and compensation of special concern for wildlife conservation. However, the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of damage and claims at large scales are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the patterns of damage caused by brown bears Ursus arctos and its ecological and socio-economic correlates at a continental scale. We compiled information...

Data from: Genomic evidence of demographic fluctuations and lack of genetic structure across flyways in a long distance migrant, the European turtle dove

Luciano Calderón, Leonardo Campagna, Thomas Wilke, Hervé Lormee, Cyril Eraud, Jenny C. Dunn, Gregorio Rocha, Pavel Zehtindjiev, Dimitrios E. Bakaloudis, Benjamin Metzger, Jacopo G. Cecere, Melanie Marx & Petra Quillfeldt
Background: Understanding how past climatic oscillations have affected organismic evolution will help predict the impact that current climate change has on living organisms. The European turtle dove, Streptopelia turtur, is a warm-temperature adapted species and a long distance migrant that uses multiple flyways to move between Europe and Africa. Despite being abundant, it is categorized as vulnerable because of a long-term demographic decline. We studied the demographic history and population genetic structure of the European...

Data from: Habitat specialization predicts genetic response to fragmentation in tropical birds

Aurélie Khimoun, Cyril Eraud, Anthony Ollivier, Emilie Arnoux, Vincent Rocheteau, Marine Bely, Emilie Lefol, Martin Delpuech, Marie-Laure Carpentier, Gilles Leblond, Anthony Levesque, Anais Charbonnel, Bruno Faivre & Stéphane Garnier
Habitat fragmentation is one of the most severe threats to biodiversity as it may lead to changes in population genetic structure, with ultimate modifications of species evolutionary potential and local extinctions. Nonetheless, fragmentation does not equally affect all species and identifying which ecological traits are related to species sensitivity to habitat fragmentation could help prioritization of conservation efforts. Despite the theoretical link between species ecology and extinction proneness, comparative studies explicitly testing the hypothesis that...

Data from: Phylogeography of the small Indian civet and origin of introductions to western Indian Ocean islands

Philippe Gaubert, Riddhi Patel, Geraldine Veron, Steve M. Goodman, Maraike Willsch, Raquel Vasconcelos, Andre Lourenço, Marie Sigaud, Fabienne Justy, Bheem Dutt Joshi, Joerns Fickel & Abdreas Wilting
The biogeographic dynamics affecting the Indian subcontinent, East and Southeast Asia during the Plio-Pleistocene has generated complex biodiversity patterns. We assessed the molecular biogeography of the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica) through mitogenome and cytochrome b + control region sequencing of 89 historical and modern samples to (i) establish a time-calibrated phylogeography across the species’ native range and (ii) test introduction scenarios to western Indian Ocean islands. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses identified three geographic lineages (East...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage
    8
  • University of Lyon System
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • University of Zagreb
    1
  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    1
  • The Arctic University of Norway
    1
  • University of Extremadura
    1