79 Works

Heterogeneous genetic basis of age at maturity in salmonid fishes

Charles Waters, Anthony Clemento, Tutku Aykanat, John Garza, Kerry-Ann Naish, Shawn Narum & Craig Primmer
Understanding the genetic basis of repeated evolution of the same phenotype across taxa is a fundamental aim in evolutionary biology and has applications to conservation and management. However, the extent to which interspecific life-history trait polymorphisms share evolutionary pathways remains under-explored. We address this gap by studying the genetic basis of a key life-history trait, age at maturity, in four species of Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) that exhibit intra- and interspecific variation in this trait...

Community Sustainability Cooperatives in central California: Continued fishery participation through quota share holdings in the Pacific Coast groundfish fishery

Aaron Mamula & Rosemary Kosaka
NOAA technical memorandum NMFS-SWFSC ; 620

2017 Trinational Sardine and Small Pelagics Forum

Stephanie R. Flores
Administrative report LJ ; 19-02

Data from: Geographic and temporal dynamics of a global radiation and diversification in the killer whale

Phillip A. Morin, Kim M. Parsons, Frederick I. Archer, María C. Ávila-Arcos, Lance G. Barrett-Lennard, Luciano Dalla Rosa, Sebastián Duchêne, John W. Durban, Graeme M. Ellis, Steven H. Ferguson, John K. Ford, Michael J. Ford, Cristina Gabrilao, M. Thomas P. Gilbert, Kristin Kaschner, Craig O. Matkin, Stephen D. Petersen, Kelly M. Robertson, Ingrid N. Visser, Paul R. Wade, Simon Y. W. Ho & Andrew D. Foote
Global climate change during the Late Pleistocene periodically encroached and then released habitat during the glacial cycles, causing range expansions and contractions in some species. These dynamics have played a major role in geographic radiations, diversification and speciation. We investigate these dynamics in the most widely distributed of marine mammals, the killer whale (Orcinus orca), using a global data set of over 450 samples. This marine top predator inhabits coastal and pelagic ecosystems ranging from...

Data from: Linking transcriptional responses to organismal tolerance reveals mechanisms of thermal sensitivity in a mesothermal endangered fish

Lisa M. Komoroske, Richard E. Connon, Kenneth M. Jeffries, Nann A. Fangue & Ken M. Jeffries
Forecasting species' responses to climate change requires understanding the underlying mechanisms governing environmental stress tolerance, including acclimation capacity and acute stress responses. Current knowledge of these physiological processes in aquatic ectotherms is largely drawn from eurythermal or extreme stenothermal species. Yet many species of conservation concern exhibit tolerance windows and acclimation capacities in between these extremes. We linked transcriptome profiles to organismal tolerance in a mesothermal endangered fish, the delta smelt (Hypomesus transpacificus), to quantify...

Data from: Genetic stock composition of marine bycatch reveals disproportional impacts on depleted river herring genetic stocks

Daniel J. Hasselman, Eric C. Anderson, Emily E. Argo, N. David Bethoney, Stephen R. Gephard, David M. Post, Bradley P. Schondelmeier, Thomas F. Schultz, Theodore V. Willis & Eric P. Palkovacs
Bycatch of mid-trophic level anadromous fishes that connect marine and freshwater ecosystems is a growing conservation concern. Anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A. aestivalis) are important components of coastal freshwater and marine food webs, but have experienced dramatic declines in the abundances of spawning adults. Freshwater-focused restoration efforts have yielded few consistent signs of recovery; raising concerns that bycatch in Northwest Atlantic commercial fisheries may be negating these conservation actions. Using data from...

Data from: Crossing to safety: Dispersal, colonization and mate choice in evolutionarily distinct populations of Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus.

Gregory O’Corry-Crowe, Tom Gelatt, Lorrie Rea, Carolina Bonin, Michael Rehberg & Greg O'Corry-Crowe
Population growth typically involves range expansion and establishment of new breeding sites, while the opposite occurs during declines. Although density-dependence is widely invoked in theoretical studies of emigration and colonization in expanding populations, few empirical studies have documented the mechanisms. Still fewer have documented the direction and mechanisms of individual transfer in declining populations. Here we screen large numbers of pups sampled on their natal rookeries for variation in mtDNA (n=1,106) and 16 microsatellite loci...

Data from: A role for migration-linked genes and genomic islands in divergence of a songbird

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Jason Boone, Jazz Pouls & Thomas B. Smith
Next-generation sequencing has made it possible to begin asking questions about the process of divergence at the level of the genome. For example, recently there has been a debate around the role of “genomic islands of divergence” (i.e. blocks of outlier loci) in facilitating the process of speciation-with-gene-flow. The Swainson’s thrush, Catharus ustulatus, is a migratory songbird with two genetically-distinct subspecies that differ in a number of traits known to be involved in reproductive isolation...

Data from: Trophic sensitivity of invasive predator and native prey interactions: integrating environmental context and climate change

Brian S. Cheng, Lisa M. Komoroske & Edwin D. Grosholz
Climate change is predicted to intensify the impacts of invasive species by enhancing their performance relative to their native counterparts. However, few studies have compared the performance of invasive predators and native prey, despite the fact that non-native predators are well known to disrupt native communities. The ‘trophic sensitivity hypothesis’ suggests that predators are less tolerant of increasing environmental stress than their prey, whereas the ‘tolerant invaders hypothesis’ suggests that invaders are more tolerant than...

Data from: Whole-body endothermy in a mesopelagic fish, the opah, Lampris guttatus

Nicholas C. Wegner, Owyn E. Snodgrass, Heidi Dewar & John R. Hyde
Endothermy (the metabolic production and retention of heat to warm body temperature above ambient) enhances physiological function, and whole-body endothermy generally sets mammals and birds apart from other animals. Here, we describe a whole-body form of endothermy in a fish, the opah (Lampris guttatus), that produces heat through the constant “flapping” of wing-like pectoral fins and minimizes heat loss through a series of counter-current heat exchangers within its gills. Unlike other fish, opah distribute warmed...

Co-occurrence of beaked whale strandings and naval sonar in the Mariana Islands, Western Pacific

Anne Simonis, Robert Brownell, Bruce Thayre, Jennifer Trickey, Erin Oleson, Roderick Huntington & Simone Baumann-Pickering
Mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS), used for antisubmarine warfare (ASW), has been associated with multiple beaked whale (BW) mass stranding events. Multinational naval ASW exercises have utilized MFAS offshore of the Mariana Archipelago semi-annually since 2006. We report BW and MFAS acoustic activity near the islands of Saipan and Tinian from March 2010 through November 2014. Signals from Cuvier’s (Ziphius cavirostris) and Blainville’s beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris), and a third unidentified BW species were detected throughout...

Data from: Dispersal of a near-shore marine fish connects marine reserves and adjacent fished areas along an open coast

Diana Baetscher, Eric Anderson, Elizabeth Gilbert-Horvath, Daniel Malone, Emily Saarman, Mark Carr & John Garza
Marine species with pelagic larvae typically exhibit little population structure, suggesting long distance dispersal and high gene flow. Directly quantifying dispersal of marine fishes is challenging but important, particularly for design of marine protected areas (MPAs). Here, we studied kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens) sampled along ~25 km of coastline in a boundary current-driven ecosystem and used genetic parentage analysis to identify dispersal events and characterize them, since the distance between sedentary parents and their settled...

Data from: Circumpolar diversity and geographic differentiation of mtDNA in the critically endangered Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia)

Angela L. Sremba, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Trevor A. Branch, Rick L. LeDuc & C. Scott Baker
The Antarctic blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus intermedia) was hunted to near extinction between 1904 and 1972, declining from an estimated initial abundance of more than 250,000 to fewer than 400. Here, we describe mtDNA control region diversity and geographic differentiation in the surviving population of the Antarctic blue whale, using 218 biopsy samples collected under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) during research cruises from 1990–2009. Microsatellite genotypes and mtDNA sequences identified 166...

Data from: Small founding number and low genetic diversity in an introduced species exhibiting limited invasion success (speckled dace, Rhinichthys osculus)

Andrew P. Kinziger, Rodney J. Nakamoto, Eric C. Anderson & Bret C. Harvey
Molecular evaluations of successful invaders are common, however studies of introduced species that have had limited invasion success, or have died out completely, are rare. We studied an introduced population of speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus) from northern California, USA that has rapidly increased in abundance but remained restricted to a 25-km stretch of river since its introduction in the mid-1980s. Field and laboratory analyses indicate that invasion success of speckled dace is constrained by the...

Data from: Comparative population genetic analysis of bocaccio rockfish Sebastes paucispinis using anonymous and gene-associated simple sequence repeat loci

Vincent P. Buonaccorsi, Carol A. Kimbrell, Eric A. Lynn & John R. Hyde
Comparative population genetic analyses of traditional and emergent molecular markers aid in determining appropriate use of new technologies. The bocaccio rockfish Sebastes paucispinis is a high-gene-flow marine species off the west coast of North America that experienced strong population decline over the past three decades. We used 18 anonymous and 13 gene associated simple sequence repeat loci (EST-SSRs) to characterize range-wide population structure with temporal replicates. No FST-outliers were detected using the LOSITAN program, suggesting...

Data from: Mitogenomic phylogenetics of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus spp.): genetic evidence for revision of subspecies

Frederick I. Archer, Phillip A. Morin, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kelly M. Robertson, Matthew S. Leslie, Martine Bérubé, Simone Panigada & Barbara L. Taylor
There are three described subspecies of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus): B. p. physalus Linnaeus, 1758 in the Northern Hemisphere, B. p. quoyi Fischer, 1829 in the Southern Hemisphere, and a recently described pygmy form, B. p. patachonica Burmeister, 1865. The discrete distribution in the North Pacific and North Atlantic raises the question of whether a single Northern Hemisphere subspecies is valid. We assess phylogenetic patterns using ~16 K base pairs of the complete mitogenome for...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of the Pelagic Thresher Shark (Alopias pelagicus) in the Pacific Ocean: evidence for two evolutionarily significant units

Diego Cardeñosa, John Hyde & Susana Caballero
There has been an increasing concern about shark overexploitation in the last decade, especially for open ocean shark species, where there is a paucity of data about their life histories and population dynamics. Little is known regarding the population structure of the pelagic thresher shark, Alopias pelagicus. Though an earlier study using mtDNA control region data, showed evidence for differences between eastern and western Pacific populations, the study was hampered by low sample size and...

Data from: Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population

Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Rick LeDuc, Aimee Lang, Barbara Taylor, Lida E. Pimper, Luis Bedriñana-Romano, Howard C. Rosenbaum & Christian C. Figueroa
Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas,...

Data from: Mapping migration in a songbird using high-resolution genetic markers

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Kristina L. Paxton, Vanessa Apkenas, Sirena Lao, Rodney B. Siegel, David F. DeSante, Frank Moore, Thomas B. Smith & Kristen C. Ruegg
Neotropical migratory birds are declining across the Western Hemisphere, but conservation efforts have been hampered by the inability to assess where migrants are most limited – the breeding grounds, migratory stopover sites, or wintering areas. A major challenge has been the lack of an efficient, reliable, and broadly applicable method for measuring the strength of migratory connections between populations across the annual cycle. Here we show how high-resolution genetic markers can be used to identify...

Data from: Genetic and individual assignment of tetraploid green sturgeon with SNP assay data

Eric C. Anderson, Thomas C. Ng, Eric D. Crandall & John Carlos Garza
Polyploid organisms pose substantial obstacles to genetic analysis, as molecular assay data are usually difficult to evaluate in a Mendelian framework. Green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) is a tetraploid species and is facing significant conservation challenges, including bycatch in ocean fisheries. We present here novel molecular genetic assays and analytical methodology for green sturgeon that allow discrimination of fish from the two visually indistinguishable distinct population segments (DPSs), and also provide individual-specific genetic tags. We show...

Data from: Genetic variation in blue whales in the eastern Pacific: implication for taxonomy and use of common wintering grounds

Richard G. LeDuc, F.I. Archer, Aimee R. Lang, Karen K. Martien, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Koen Van Waerebeek, Robert L. Brownell, Barbara L. Taylor & F. I. Archer
Many aspects of blue whale biology are poorly understood. Some of the gaps in our knowledge, such as those regarding their basic taxonomy and seasonal movements, directly affect our ability to monitor and manage blue whale populations. As a step towards filling in some of these gaps, microsatellite and mtDNA sequence analyses were conducted on blue whale samples from the Southern Hemisphere, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), and the northeast Pacific. The results indicate that...

Data from: Demography or selection on linked cultural traits or genes? Investigating the driver of low mtDNA diversity in the sperm whale using complementary mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses

Phillip A. Morin, Andrew D. Foote, Charles Scott Baker, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kristin Kaschner, Bruce R. Mate, Sarah L. Mesnick, Victoria L. Pease, Patricia E. Rosel & Alana Alexander
Mitochondrial DNA has been heavily utilized in phylogeography studies for several decades. However, underlying patterns of demography and phylogeography may be misrepresented due to coalescence stochasticity, selection, variation in mutation rates, and cultural hitchhiking (linkage of genetic variation to culturally transmitted traits affecting fitness). Cultural hitchhiking has been suggested as an explanation for low genetic diversity in species with strong social structures, counteracting even high mobility, abundance and limited barriers to dispersal. One such species...

Data from: A tradeoff between precopulatory and postcopulatory trait investment in male cetaceans

James P. Dines, Sarah L. Mesnick, Katherine Ralls, Laura J. May Collado, Ingi Agnarsson, Matthew D. Dean & Laura May-Collado
Mating with multiple partners is common across species, and understanding how individual males secure fertilization in the face of competition remains a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Game theory stipulates that males have a fixed budget for reproduction that can lead to a trade-off between investment in precopulatory traits like body size, armaments, and ornaments, and postcopulatory traits such as testis size and spermatogenic efficiency. Recent theoretical and empirical studies have shown that if males...

Data from: Post-glacial habitat release and incipient speciation in the genus Delphinus

Iris Segura-García, Juan Pablo Gallo, Susan Chivers, Raúl Díaz-Gamboa & A. Rus Hoelzel
The role of ecological and changing environmental factors in the radiation of species diversity is a fundamental question in evolutionary biology. Of particular interest is the potential for these factors to determine the boundary between what we would consider differentiation among populations and incipient speciation. Dolphins in the genus Delphinus provide a useful test case, exhibiting morphological variation in beak length, coloration and body size across their wide geographic distribution, and in particular among coastal...

Data from: Phylogenomic resolution of the cetacean tree of life using target sequence capture

Michael McGowen, Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Sandra Álvarez-Carretero, Mario Dos Reis, Monika Struebig, Rob Deaville, Paul Jepson, Simon Jarman, Andrea Polanowski, Phillip Morin & Stephen Rossiter
The evolution of the cetaceans, from their early transition to an aquatic lifestyle to their subsequent diversification, has been the subject of numerous studies. However, while the higher-level relationships among cetacean families have been largely settled, several aspects of the systematics within these groups remain unresolved. Problematic clades include the oceanic dolphins (37 spp.), which have experienced a recent rapid radiation, and the beaked whales (22 spp.), which have not been investigated in detail using...

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