6 Works

Data from: Population differentiation of 2 forms of Bryde’s whales in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

Francine Kershaw, Matthew S. Leslie, Tim Collins, Rubaiyat M. Mansur, Brian D. Smith, Gianna Minton, Robert Baldwin, Richard G. LeDuc, R. Charles Anderson, & Howard C. Rosenbaum
Accurate identification of units for conservation is particularly challenging for marine species as obvious barriers to gene flow are generally lacking. Bryde’s whales (Balaenoptera spp.) are subject to multiple human-mediated stressors, including fisheries bycatch, ship strikes, and scientific whaling by Japan. For effective management, a clear understanding of how populations of each Bryde’s whale species/subspecies are genetically structured across their range is required. We conducted a population-level analysis of mtDNA control region sequences with 56...

Data from: Next-generation sequencing for molecular ecology: a caveat regarding pooled samples

Eric C. Anderson, Hans J. Skaug & Daniel J. Barshis
We develop a model based on the Dirichlet-compound multinomial distribution (CMD) and Ewens sampling formula to predict the fraction of SNP loci that will appear fixed for alternate alleles between two pooled samples drawn from the same underlying population. We apply this model to next-generation sequencing (NGS) data from Baltic Sea herring recently published by (Corander et al., , Molecular Ecology, 2931–2940), and show that there are many more fixed loci than expected in the...

Data from: Calculating the ecological impacts of animal-borne instruments on aquatic organisms

T. Todd Jones, Kyle S. Van Houtan, Brian L. Bostrom, Peter Ostafichuk, Jon Mikkelsen, Emre Tezcan, Michael Carey, Brittany Imlach & Jeffrey A. Seminoff
1. Animal-borne instruments provide researchers with valuable data to address important questions on wildlife ecology and conservation. However, these devices have known impacts on animal behaviour and energetics. Tags deployed on migrating animals may reduce reproductive output through increased energy demands or cause phenological mismatches of foraging and nesting events. For marine organisms, the only tagging guidelines that exist are based on lift and thrust impacts on birds – concepts that do not translate well...

Data from: Strong maternal fidelity and natal philopatry shape genetic structure in North Pacfic humpback whales

C. Scott Baker, Debbie Steel, John Calambokidis, Erin A. Falcone, Ursula Gozález-Peral, Jay Barlow, Alexander M. Burdin, Phillip J. Clapham, John K. B. Ford, Christine M. Gabriele, David Mattila, Janice M. Straley, Barbara L. Taylor, Jorge Urbán, Paul R. Wade, David Weller, Briana H. Witteveen, Manami Yamaguchi, CS Baker, BH Witteveen, E Falcone, BL Taylor, JKB Ford, AM Burdin, PJ Clapham … & JM Straley
We quantified the relative influence of maternal fidelity to feeding grounds and natal fidelity to breeding grounds in humpback whales based on an ocean-wide survey of mitochondrial (mt) DNA diversity in the North Pacific. For 2,193 biopsy samples collected from whales in 10 feeding regions and 8 breeding regions during the winter and summer of 2004 to 2006, we first used microsatellite genotyping (average, 9.5 loci) to identify replicate samples. From sequences of the mtDNA...

Data from: Large-scale parentage analysis reveals reproductive patterns and heritability of spawn timing in a hatchery population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Alicia Abadía-Cardoso, Eric C. Anderson, Devon E. Pearse & John Carlos Garza
Understanding life history traits is an important first step in formulating effective conservation and management strategies. The use of artificial propagation and supplementation as such a strategy can have numerous effects on the supplemented natural populations and minimizing life history divergence is crucial in minimizing these effects. Here, we use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes for large-scale parentage analysis and pedigree reconstruction in a hatchery population of steelhead, the anadromous form of rainbow trout. Nearly...

Data from: Mitogenomic phylogenetics of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus spp.): genetic evidence for revision of subspecies

Frederick I. Archer, Phillip A. Morin, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kelly M. Robertson, Matthew S. Leslie, Martine Bérubé, Simone Panigada & Barbara L. Taylor
There are three described subspecies of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus): B. p. physalus Linnaeus, 1758 in the Northern Hemisphere, B. p. quoyi Fischer, 1829 in the Southern Hemisphere, and a recently described pygmy form, B. p. patachonica Burmeister, 1865. The discrete distribution in the North Pacific and North Atlantic raises the question of whether a single Northern Hemisphere subspecies is valid. We assess phylogenetic patterns using ~16 K base pairs of the complete mitogenome for...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    6
  • University of California System
    2
  • Duke University
    1
  • Institute of Geography
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • University of Groningen
    1
  • University of California, San Diego
    1
  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    1
  • University of Alaska System
    1