7 Works

Data from: Crossing to safety: Dispersal, colonization and mate choice in evolutionarily distinct populations of Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus.

Gregory O’Corry-Crowe, Tom Gelatt, Lorrie Rea, Carolina Bonin, Michael Rehberg & Greg O'Corry-Crowe
Population growth typically involves range expansion and establishment of new breeding sites, while the opposite occurs during declines. Although density-dependence is widely invoked in theoretical studies of emigration and colonization in expanding populations, few empirical studies have documented the mechanisms. Still fewer have documented the direction and mechanisms of individual transfer in declining populations. Here we screen large numbers of pups sampled on their natal rookeries for variation in mtDNA (n=1,106) and 16 microsatellite loci...

Data from: A role for migration-linked genes and genomic islands in divergence of a songbird

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Jason Boone, Jazz Pouls & Thomas B. Smith
Next-generation sequencing has made it possible to begin asking questions about the process of divergence at the level of the genome. For example, recently there has been a debate around the role of “genomic islands of divergence” (i.e. blocks of outlier loci) in facilitating the process of speciation-with-gene-flow. The Swainson’s thrush, Catharus ustulatus, is a migratory songbird with two genetically-distinct subspecies that differ in a number of traits known to be involved in reproductive isolation...

Data from: DNA barcoding provides support for a cryptic species complex within the globally distributed and fishery important opah (Lampris guttatus)

John R. Hyde, Karen E. Underkoffler & Meagan A. Sundberg
The cornerstone of fisheries management relies on a solid taxonomic base and an understanding of how animals can be grouped into coherent management units. Surprisingly little is known about the basic biology and ecology of opah (Lampris guttatus), a globally distributed species that is commercially exploited and regionally common in the North Pacific. Recent efforts to collect life history data on this species uncovered evidence of two North Pacific morphotypes. Sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome...

Data from: Nuclear and mitochondrial patterns of population structure in North Pacific false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens)

Karen K. Martien, Susan J. Chivers, Robin W. Baird, Frederick I. Archer, Antoinette M. Gorgone, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, David Mattila, Daniel J. McSweeney, Erin M. Oleson, Carol Palmer, Victoria L. Pease, Kelly M. Robertson, Gregory S. Schorr, Mark B. Schultz, Daniel L. Webster & Barbara L. Taylor
False killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) are large Delphinids typically found in deep water far offshore. However, in the Hawaiian Archipelago there are two resident island-associated populations of false killer whales, one in the waters around the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI) and one in the waters around the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). We use mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences and genotypes from 16 nuclear (nucDNA) microsatellite loci from 206 individuals to examine levels of differentiation...

Data from: Mapping migration in a songbird using high-resolution genetic markers

Kristen Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Kristina L. Paxton, Vanessa Apkenas, Sirena Lao, Rodney B. Siegel, David F. DeSante, Frank Moore, Thomas B. Smith & Kristen C. Ruegg
Neotropical migratory birds are declining across the Western Hemisphere, but conservation efforts have been hampered by the inability to assess where migrants are most limited – the breeding grounds, migratory stopover sites, or wintering areas. A major challenge has been the lack of an efficient, reliable, and broadly applicable method for measuring the strength of migratory connections between populations across the annual cycle. Here we show how high-resolution genetic markers can be used to identify...

Data from: Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population

Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Rick LeDuc, Aimee Lang, Barbara Taylor, Lida E. Pimper, Luis Bedriñana-Romano, Howard C. Rosenbaum & Christian C. Figueroa
Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas,...

Data from: Genetic diversity and population structure of the Pelagic Thresher Shark (Alopias pelagicus) in the Pacific Ocean: evidence for two evolutionarily significant units

Diego Cardeñosa, John Hyde & Susana Caballero
There has been an increasing concern about shark overexploitation in the last decade, especially for open ocean shark species, where there is a paucity of data about their life histories and population dynamics. Little is known regarding the population structure of the pelagic thresher shark, Alopias pelagicus. Though an earlier study using mtDNA control region data, showed evidence for differences between eastern and western Pacific populations, the study was hampered by low sample size and...

Registration Year

  • 2014
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    7
  • University of California System
    2
  • University of Hawaii System
    2
  • University of California Los Angeles
    2
  • CIUDAD
    1
  • The Institute for Bird Populations
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • Alaska Fisheries Science Center
    1
  • University of Alaska System
    1
  • University of Talca
    1