72 Works

Data from: Resprouter fraction in Cape Restionaceae assemblages varies with climate and soil type

Rafael O. Wüest, Glenn Litsios, Félix Forest, Christian Lexer, H. Peter Linder, Nicolas Salamin, Niklaus E. Zimmermann & Peter B. Pearman
While fire-induced changes in biodiversity are well documented, less is known about how fire impacts life-history variation and diversity of functional traits that represent distinct strategies for persistence in fire-driven ecosystems. One example is the dichotomy in which ‘resprouter’ species usually survive fires to produce new growth, while ‘reseeder’ species perish and re-establish from seed. Variable relative numbers of reseeder and resprouter species in local assemblages of Restionaceae (Poales) of the Cape Floristic Region (CFR),...

Data from: Adaptive evolution and segregating load contribute to the genomic landscape of divergence in two tree species connected by episodic gene flow

Camille Christe, Kai N. Stölting, Margot Paris, Christelle Fraїsse, Nicolas Bierne & Christian Lexer
Speciation often involves repeated episodes of genetic contact between divergent populations before reproductive isolation (RI) is complete. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) holds great promise for unravelling the genomic bases of speciation. We have studied two ecologically divergent, hybridizing species of the ‘model tree’ genus Populus (poplars, aspens, cottonwoods), Populus alba and P. tremula, using >8.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from WGS of population pools. We used the genomic data to (i) scan these species’ genomes...

Data from: Small-scale patterns in snowmelt timing affect gene flow and the distribution of genetic diversity in the alpine dwarf shrub Salix herbacea

Andrés J. Cortés, Stephan Waeber, Christian Lexer, Janosch Sedlacek, Julia A. Wheeler, Mark Van Kleunen, Oliver Bossdorf, Günter Hoch, Christian Rixen, Sonja Wipf & Sophie Karrenberg
Current threats to biodiversity, such as climate change, are thought to alter the within-species genetic diversity among microhabitats in highly heterogeneous alpine environments. Assessing the spatial organization and dynamics of genetic diversity within species can help to predict the responses of organisms to environmental change. In this study, we evaluated whether small-scale heterogeneity in snowmelt timing restricts gene flow between microhabitats in the common long-lived dwarf shrub Salix herbacea L. We surveyed 273 genets across...

Data from: Progressively excluding mammals of different body size affects community and trait structure of ground beetles

Xiaowei Wang, Magdalena Steiner, Martin Schütz, Martijn L. Vandegehuchte & Anita C. Risch
Mammalian grazing induces changes in vegetation properties in grasslands, which can affect a wide variety of other animals including many arthropods. However, the impacts may depend on the type and body size of these mammals. Furthermore, how mammals influence functional trait syndromes of arthropod communities is not well known. We progressively excluded large (e.g. red deer, chamois), medium (e.g. alpine marmot, mountain hare), and small (e.g. mice) mammals using size-selective fences in two vegetation types...

Data from: Climatic niche evolution is faster in sympatric than allopatric lineages of the butterfly genus Pyrgus

Camille Pitteloud, Nils Arrigo, Tomasz Suchan, Alicia Mastretta-Yanes, Roger Vila, Vlad Dinca, Juan Hernández-Roldán, Ernst Brockmann, Yannick Chittaro, Irena Kleckova, Luca Fumagalli, Sven Buerki, Loïc Pellissier & Nadir Alvarez
Understanding how speciation relates to ecological divergence has long fascinated biologists. It is assumed that ecological divergence is essential to sympatric speciation, as a mechanism to avoid competition and eventually lead to reproductive isolation, while divergence in allopatry is not necessarily associated with niche differentiation. The impact of the spatial context of divergence on the evolutionary rates of abiotic dimensions of the ecological niche has rarely been explored for an entire clade. Here, we compare...

Global biogeographic synthesis and priority conservation regions of the relict tree family Juglandaceae

Yi-Gang Song
Abstract Aim: To establish a complete database of Juglandaceae at a spatiotemporal scale and develop a phylogeographic framework with which to elucidate the distributional patterns, diversity patterns, origins, evolution, and conservation priority regions of this family. Location: Worldwide Methods: Data on the distribution of all the extant and fossil species of Juglandaceae were collected, followed by analyses of its latitudinal distribution, elevational distribution, and species and generic diversity. Furthermore, based on all genera and 87%...

Avant-propos Français parlés et français 'tout court'

Julie Rothenbühler, Maguelone Sauzet, Marie-Jose Beguelin & Gilles Corminboeuf

Taxinomie des constructions en si dans un corpus de français oral L'exemple d'OFROM

Gilles Corminboeuf & Timon Jahn

Data from: The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversion polymorphisms in Drosophila melanogaster

Martin Kapun & Thomas Flatt
Chromosomal inversions, structural mutations that reverse a segment of a chromosome, cause suppression of recombination in the heterozygous state. Several studies have shown that inversion polymorphisms can form clines or fluctuate predictably in frequency over seasonal time spans. These observations prompted the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements might be subject to spatially and/or temporally varying selection. Here we review what has been learned about the adaptive significance of inversion polymorphisms in the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster,...

Data from: Genetic load, inbreeding depression and hybrid vigor covary with population size: an empirical evaluation of theoretical predictions

Jennifer N. Lohr & Christoph R. Haag
Reduced population size is thought to have strong consequences for evolutionary processes as it enhances the strength of genetic drift. In its interaction with selection, this is predicted to increase the genetic load, reduce inbreeding depression, and increase hybrid vigour, and in turn affect phenotypic evolution. Several of these predictions have been tested, but comprehensive studies controlling for confounding factors are scarce. Here we show that populations of Daphnia magna, which vary strongly in genetic...

Data from: Components of reproductive isolation between Orchis mascula and O. pauciflora

Giovanni Scopece, Antonio Croce, Christian Lexer & Salvatore Cozzolino
Studies of the strength and nature of reproductive isolation (RI) between species can greatly contribute to our understanding of speciation. Although the role of RI in speciation is well recognized, there is a dearth of information on the contributions of different barriers between related plant species. Here, we estimated multiple components of RI between two Mediterranean orchid sister species (Orchis mascula and Orchis pauciflora), disentangling the strength and absolute contributions of seven different isolating mechanisms....

Data from: Plant neighbours rather than soil biota determine impact of an alien plant invader

Yan Sun, Heinz Müller-Schärer & Urs Schaffner
1. Various factors have been shown contributing to the ecosystem impact of invasive alien plants, but their relative importance remains unclear. We focused on the effects of neighbouring plant community and soil biota as these biotic factors have been repeatedly put forward to explain invasion success (e.g. as components of the novel weapons and of the biotic release hypothesis). 2. To assess their relative importance in explaining the high impact of Centaurea stoebe during the...

Data from: Patterns of genetic diversity and differentiation in resistance gene clusters of two hybridizing European Populus species

Celine Caseys, Kai N. Stölting, Thelma Barbara, Santiago C. Gonzalez-Martinez & Christian Lexer
Resistance genes (R-genes) are essential for long-lived organisms such as forest trees, which are exposed to diverse herbivores and pathogens. In short-lived model species, R-genes have been shown to be involved in species isolation. Here, we studied more than 400 trees from two natural hybrid zones of the European Populus species Populus alba and Populus tremula for microsatellite markers located in three R-gene clusters, including one cluster situated in the incipient sex chromosome region. The...

Data from: Unexpected ancestry of Populus seedlings from a hybrid zone implies a large role for postzygotic selection in the maintenance of species

Dorothea Lindtke, Zachariah Gompert, Christian Lexer & C. Alex Buerkle
In the context of potential interspecific gene flow, the integrity of species will be maintained by reproductive barriers that reduce genetic exchange, including traits associated with prezygotic isolation or poor performance of hybrids. Hybrid zones can be used to study the importance of different reproductive barriers, particularly when both parental species and hybrids occur in close spatial proximity. We investigated the importance of barriers to gene flow that act early versus late in the life...

Data from: Genomic and functional approaches reveal a case of adaptive introgression from Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar) in P. trichocarpa (black cottonwood)

Adriana Suarez-Gonzalez, Charles Hefer, Camille Christie, Oliver Corea, Christian Lexer, Quentin C. B. Cronk, Carl J. Douglas, Charles A. Hefer & Camille Christe
Natural hybrid zones in forest trees provide systems to study the transfer of adaptive genetic variation by introgression. Previous landscape genomic studies in Populus trichocarpa, a keystone tree species, indicated genomic footprints of admixture with its sister species P. balsamifera and identified candidate genes for local adaptation. Here, we explored patterns of introgression and signals of local adaptation in P. trichocarpa and P. balsamifera, employing genome resequencing data from three chromosomes in pure species and...

Data from: Increased temperature disrupts the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationship

Elodie C. Parain, Rudolf P. Rohr, Sarah M. Gray & Louis-Félix Bersier
Gaining knowledge of how ecosystems provide essential services to humans is of primary importance, especially with the current threat of climate change. Yet, little is known about how increased temperature will impact the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) relationship. We tackled this subject theoretically and experimentally. We developed a BEF theory based on mechanistic population dynamic models, which allows the inclusion of the effect of temperature. Using experimentally established relationships between attack rate and temperature, the model...

Data from: Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the mechanisms underpinning ageing and fecundity in social insects

Judith Korb, Karen Meusemann, Denise Aumer, Abel Bernadou, Daniel Elsner, Barbara Feldmeyer, Susanne Foitzik, Jürgen Heinze, Romain Libbrecht, Silu Lin, Megha Majoe, José Manuel Monroy Kuhn, Volker Nehring, Matteo A. Negroni, Robert J. Paxton, Alice C. Séguret, Marah Stoldt & Thomas Flatt
Exceptional longevity of social insect queens despite their lifelong high fecundity remains poorly understood in ageing biology. To gain insights into the mechanisms that might underlie ageing in social insects, we compared gene expression patterns between young and old castes (both queens and workers) across different lineages of social insects (two termite, two bee and two ant species). After global analyses, we paid particular attention to genes of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signalling (IIS)/target...

Data from: Comparative analysis of the shape and size of the middle ear cavity of turtles reveals no correlation with habitat ecology

Christian Foth, Serjoscha W. Evers, Walter G. Joyce, Virginie S. Volpato & Roger B. J. Benson
The middle ear of turtles differs from other reptiles in being separated into two distinct compartments. Several ideas have been proposed as to why the middle ear is compartmentalized in turtles, most suggesting a relationship with underwater hearing. Extant turtle species span fully marine to strictly terrestrial habitats, and ecomorphological hypotheses of turtle hearing predict that this should correlate with variation in the structure of the middle ear due to differences in the fluid properties...

Fossil-informed models reveal a Boreotropical origin and divergent evolutionary trajectories in the walnut family (Juglandaceae)

Qiuyue Zhang, Richard Ree, Nicolas Salamin, Yaowu Xing & Daniele Silvestro
Temperate woody plants in the Northern Hemisphere have long been known to exhibit high species richness in East Asia and North America and significantly lower diversity in Europe, but the causes of this pattern remain debated. Here, we quantify the roles of dispersal, niche evolution, and extinction in shaping the geographic diversity of the temperate woody plant family Juglandaceae (walnuts and their relatives). Integrating evidence from molecular, morphological, fossil, and (paleo)environmental data, we find strong...

Data from: Structural complexity and large-sized trees explain shifting species richness and carbon relationship across vegetation types

Sylvanus Mensah, Valere Salako & Thomas Seifert
1. It is prominently claimed that enhancing forest diversity would play a dual role of nature conservation and climate regulation. While the idea is intuitively appealing, studies show that species richness effects on aboveground carbon (AGC) are not always positive, but instead unpredictable especially across scales and complex terrestrial systems having large-diameter and tall-stature trees. Previous studies have further considered structural complexity and larger trees as determinants of AGC. Yet it remains unclear what drives...

Data from: Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) regulates the circadian clock

Andrea Brenna, Iwona Olejniczak, Rohit Chavan, Jürgen Ripperger, Sonja Langmesser, Elisabetta Cameroni, Zehan Hu, Claudio De Virgilio, Jörn Dengjel & Urs Albrecht
Circadian oscillations emerge from transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops. An important step in generating rhythmicity is the translocation of clock components into the nucleus, which is regulated in many cases by kinases. In mammals, the kinase promoting the nuclear import of the key clock component Period 2 (PER2) is unknown. We observed that the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) regulates the mammalian clock involving phosphorylation of PER2. Knock-down of Cdk5 in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the...

Ancient mitogenomics clarifies radiation of extinct Mascarene giant tortoises (Cylindraspis spp.)

Christian Kehlmaier, Eva Graciá, Patrick D. Campbell, Margaretha D. Hofmeyr, Silke Schweiger, Albert Martínez-Silvestre, Walter Joyce & Uwe Fritz
The five extinct giant tortoises of the genus Cylindraspis belong to the most iconic species of the enigmatic fauna of the Mascarene Islands that went largely extinct after the discovery of the islands. To resolve the phylogeny and biogeography of Cylindraspis, we analysed a data set of 45 mitogenomes that includes all lineages of extant tortoises and eight near-complete sequences of all Mascarene species extracted from historic and subfossil material. Cylindraspis is an ancient lineage...

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