78 Works

Data from: Middle Bronze Age land use practices in the north-western Alpine foreland – A multi-proxy study of colluvial deposits, archaeological features and peat bogs

Sascha Scherer, Benjamin Höpfer, Katleen Deckers, Elske Fischer, Markus Fuchs, Ellen Kandeler, Eva Lehndorff, Johanna Lomax, Sven Marhan, Elena Marinova, Julia Meister, Christian Poll, Humay Rahimova, Manfred Rösch, Kristen Wroth, Julia Zastrow, Thomas Knopf, Thomas Scholten & Peter Kühn
This paper aims to reconstruct Middle Bronze Age (MBA) land use practices in the north-western Alpine foreland (SW Germany, Hegau). We used a multi-proxy approach including the biogeochemical proxies from colluvial deposits in the surrounding of the well-documented settlement site of Anselfingen and offsite pollen data from two peat bogs. This approach allowed in-depth insights into the MBA subsistence economy and shows that the MBA in the north-western Alpine foreland was a period of establishing...

Influence of mixing and sludge volume on stability, reproducibility, and productivity of laboratory-scale anaerobic digestion

Stanislava Mlinar, Weig Alfons R. & Ruth Freitag

Data from: Higher predation risk for insect prey at low latitudes and elevations

Tomas Roslin, Bess Hardwick, Vojtech Novotny, William K. Petry, Nigel R. Andrew, Ashley Asmus, Isabel C. Barrio, Yves Basset, Andrea Larissa Boesing, Timothy C. Bonebrake, Erin K. Cameron, Wesley Dáttilo, David A. Donoso, Pavel Drozd, Claudia L. Gray, David S. Hik, Sarah J. Hill, Tapani Hopkins, Shuyin Huang, Bonny Koane, Benita Laird-Hopkins, Liisa Laukkanen, Owen T. Lewis, Sol Milne, Isaiah Mwesige … & Eleanor M. Slade
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latitude and elevation were driven by arthropod predators, with no systematic...

Diversification in evolutionary arenas – assessment and synthesis

Nicolai M. Nürk, H. Peter Linder, Renske E. Onstein, Matthew J. Larcombe, Colin E. Hughes, Laura Piñeiro Fernández, Philipp M. Schlüter, Luis Valente, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Vanessa Cutts, Michael J. Donoghue, Erika J. Edwards, Richard Field, Suzette G.A. Flantua, Steven I. Higgins, Anke Jentsch, Sigrid Liede-Schumann & Michael D. Pirie
Understanding how and why rates of evolutionary diversification vary is a central issue in evolutionary biology, ecology and biogeography. The concept of adaptive radiation has attracted much interest, but is metaphorical and verbal in nature, making it difficult to quantitatively compare different evolutionary lineages or geographic regions. In addition, the causes of evolutionary stasis are relatively neglected. Here we review the central concepts in the evolutionary diversification literature and bring these together by proposing a...

Data from: An operational definition of the biome for global change research

Timo Conradi, Jasper A. Slingsby, Guy F. Midgley, Henning Nottebrock, Andreas H. Schweiger & Steven I. Higgins
Biomes are constructs for organising knowledge on the structure and functioning of the world's ecosystems, and serve as useful units for monitoring how the biosphere responds to anthropogenic drivers, including climate change. The current practice of delimiting biomes relies on expert knowledge. Recent studies have questioned the value of such biome maps for comparative ecology and global-change research, partly due to their subjective origin. Here we propose a flexible method for developing biome maps objectively....

French (F) and Swedish (S) Founder (P) and Mutation Accumulation Line (MA) performance in France and Sweden

Charles Fenster, Mao-Lun Weng, Jon Agren, Henning Nottebrock, Eric Imbert & Matthew Rutter
Little is empirically known about the contribution of mutations to fitness in natural environments. However, Fisher's Geometric Model (FGM) provides a conceptual foundation to consider the influence of the environment on mutational effects. To quantify mutational properties in the field, we established eight sets of MA lines (7-10 generations) derived from eight founders collected from natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana from French and Swedish sites, representing the range margins of the species in Europe. We...

Formicine ants swallow their highly acidic poison for gut microbial selection and control

Simon Tragust, Claudia Herrmann, Jane Häfner, Ronja Braasch, Christina Tilgen, Maria Hoock, Margarita Milidakis, Roy Gross & Heike Feldhaar
Animals continuously encounter microorganisms that are essential for health or cause disease. They are thus challenged to control harmful microbes while allowing acquisition of beneficial microbes. This challenge is likely especially important for social insects with respect to microbes in food, as they often store food and exchange food among colony members. Here we show that formicine ants actively swallow their antimicrobial, highly acidic poison gland secretion. The ensuing acidic environment in the stomach, the...

Not a melting pot: plant species aggregate in their non-native range

Gisela C. Stotz, James F. Cahill, Jonathan A. Bennett, Cameron N. Carlyle, Edward W. Bork, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Sandra Díaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Batdelger Erdenetsetseg, Alessandra Fidelis, Heath W. Garris, Hugh A.L. Henry, Anke Jentsch, Mohammad Hassan Jouri, Kadri Koorem, Peter Manning … & Lauchlan H. Fraser
Aim: Plant species continue to be moved outside of their native range by human activities. Here, we aim at determining whether, once introduced, plants assimilate into native communities, or whether they aggregate, thus forming mosaics of native- and alien-rich communities. Alien species may aggregate in their non-native range due to shared habitat preferences, such as their tendency to establish in high-biomass, species-poor areas. Location: 22 herbaceous grasslands in 14 countries, mainly in the temperate zone....

Drought survival is positively associated with high turgor loss points in temperate perennial grassland species

Shanwen Sun, Eun-Young Jung, Julian Gaviria & Bettina Engelbrecht
1. Turgor loss point (πtlp) has been suggested to be a key trait for drought resistance in woody species. In herbaceous grassland species the role of πtlp for species drought survival has not yet been tested, although grasslands are projected to experience more frequent and intense droughts with climate change. 2. To gain insights into the role of πtlp for drought resistance of temperate perennial grassland species, we assessed πtlp of 41 species common in...

Contribution of males to brood care can compensate for their food consumption from a shared resource

Sandra Steiger, Eva M. Keppner & Manfred Ayasse
The sharing of the same food source among parents and offspring can be a driver of the evolution of family life and parental care. However, if all family members desire the same meal, competitive situations can arise, especially if resource depletion is likely. When food is shared for reproduction and the raising of offspring, parents have to decide whether they should invest in self-maintenance or in their offspring and it is not entirely clear how...

Data from: Stable isotope signatures of underground seedlings reveal the organic matter gained by adult orchids from mycorrhizal fungi

Julienne Marie-Isabelle Schweiger, Martin I. Bidartondo, Gerhard Gebauer & Julienne M.-I. Schweiger
1.Orchids produce dust seeds dependent on the provision of organic carbon by mycorrhizal fungi for their early development stages. Hence, all chlorophyllous orchids experience a dramatic switch in trophic strategies from initial mycoheterotrophy to either autotrophy or partial mycoheterotrophy during ontogeny. Yet, the degree to which partially mycoheterotrophic orchids gain carbon from their mycorrhizal fungi is unclear based on existing approaches. 2.Here, we propose a novel approach to quantify the fungal-derived organic matter gain of...

Data from: Temporal migration pattern and mating tactics influence size-assortative mating in Rana temporaria

Carolin Dittrich, Ariel Rodríguez, Ori Segev, Sanja Drakulić, Heike Feldhaar, Miguel Vences & Mark-Oliver Rödel
Assortative mating is a common pattern in sexually reproducing species, but the mechanisms leading to assortment remain poorly understood. By using the European common frog (Rana temporaria) as a model, we aim to understand the mechanisms leading to size-assortative mating in amphibians. With data from natural populations collected over several years, we first show a consistent pattern of size-assortative mating across our two study populations. We subsequently ask if assortative mating may be explained by...

A scientific journey through geo-ecological extremes – landscape dynamics at the lower Danube between the Black Sea and the Carpathian Volcanoes

Markus Finke , Ulrich Hambach & Mihai Orleanu
Universität Bayreuth, Germany (1); Universität Bayreuth, Germany (2); Centrul de Ecologie Montană, România (3)

The CTC-Trail (“Coast-to-Carpathians”) is a conceptual educational geo-trail that is being created to guide visitors through a transect from the southern parts of the western Black Sea area grasslands through the steppe regions of Dobrogea and eastern Walachia to the young volcanoes of the Carpathian Mountains, highlighting aspects of natural and cultural importance along this route. The journey also spans...

Allochthonous resources are less important for faunal communities on highly productive, small tropical islands

Sebastian Steibl, Robert Sigl, Sanja Blaha, Sophia Drescher, Gerhard Gebauer, Elif Gürkal, Frederic Hüftlein, Anna Satzger, Michael Schwarzer, Dimitri Seidenath, Jana Welfenbach, Raphael Zinser & Christian Laforsch
Ecosystems are interconnected by energy fluxes that provide resources for the inhabiting organisms along the transition zone. Especially where in-situ production is low, ecosystems can become highly dependent on external resources. The dependency on external input becomes less pronounced in systems with elevated in-situ production, where only consumer species close to the site of external input remain subsidized, whereas species distant to the input site rely on the in-situ production of the ecosystem. It is...

Data for: Spontaneous choices for insect-pollinated flower shapes by wild non-eusocial halictid bees

Scarlett Howard, Kit Prendergast, Matthew Symonds, Mani Shrestha & Adrian Dyer
The majority of angiosperms require animal pollination for reproduction and insects are the dominant group of animal pollinators. Bees are considered one of the most important and abundant insect pollinators. Research into bee behaviour and foraging decisions has typically centred on managed eusocial bee species, Apis mellifera and Bombus terrestris. Non-eusocial bees are understudied with respect to foraging strategies and decision-making, such as flower preferences. Understanding whether there are fundamental foraging strategies and preferences which...

Functional biogeography of Neotropical moist forests: trait-climate relationships and assembly patterns of tree communities

Bruno Pinho, Marcelo Tabarelli, Cajo Ter Braak, S. J. Wright, Victor Arroyo-Rodriguez, Maíra Benchimol, Bettina Engelbrecht, Simon Pierce, Peter Hietz, Bráulio Santos, Carlos Peres, Sandra Müller, Ian Wright, Frans Bongers, Madelon Lohbeck, Ülo Niinemets, Martijn Slot, Steven Jansen, Davi Jamelli, Renato Augusto Ferreira De Lima, Nathan Swenson, Richard Condit, Jos Barlow, Ferry Slik, Manuel Hernández-Ruedas … & Felipe Melo
Aim: Here we examine the functional profile of regional tree species pools across the latitudinal distribution of Neotropical moist forests, and test trait-climate relationships among local communities. We expected opportunistic strategies (acquisitive traits, small seeds) to be overrepresented in species pools further from the equator due to long-term instability, but also in terms of abundance in local communities in currently wetter, warmer and more seasonal climates. Location: Neotropics. Time period: Recent. Major taxa studied: Trees....

Data from: Living, dead, and absent trees - How do moth outbreaks shape small-scale patterns of soil organic matter stocks and dynamics at the Subarctic mountain birch treeline?

Nele Meyer, Yi Xu, Katri Karjalainen, Sylwia Adamczyk, Christina Biasi, Lona Van Delden, Angela Martin, Kevin Mganga, Kristiina Myller, Outi-Maaria Sietiö, Otso Suominen & Kristiina Karhu
Mountain birch forests (B. pubescens Ehrh. ssp. czerepanovii) at the subarctic treeline not only benefit from global warming, but are also increasingly affected by caterpillar outbreaks from foliage-feeding geometrid moths. Both of these factors have unknown consequences on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and biogeochemical cycles. We measured SOC stocks down to the bedrock under living trees and under two stages of dead trees (12 and 55 years since moth outbreak) and treeless tundra in...

Data from: Invasive Impatiens glandulifera: a driver of changes in native vegetation?

Judith Bieberich, Stefanie Müller, Heike Feldhaar & Marianne Lauerer
Biological invasions are one of the major threats to biodiversity worldwide and contribute to changing community patterns and ecosystem processes. However, it is often not obvious whether an invader is the “driver” causing ecosystem changes or a “passenger” which is facilitated by previous ecosystem changes. Causality of the impact can be demonstrated by experimental removal of the invader or introduction into a native community. Using such an experimental approach, we tested whether the impact of...

Data from: Pest control of aphids depends on landscape complexity and natural enemy interactions

Emily A. Martin, Björn Reineking, Bumsuk Seo & Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Aphids are a major concern in agricultural crops worldwide, and control by natural enemies is an essential component of the ecological intensification of agriculture. Although the complexity of agricultural landscapes is known to influence natural enemies of pests, few studies have measured the degree of pest control by different enemy guilds across gradients in landscape complexity. Here, we use multiple natural-enemy exclosures replicated in 18 fields across a gradient in landscape complexity to investigate (1)...

Data from: Spatial and ecological population genetic structures within two island-endemic Aeonium species of different niche width

David E. V. Harter, Mike Thiv, Alfons Weig, Anke Jentsch & Carl Beierkuhnlein
The Crassulacean genus Aeonium is a well-known example for plant species radiation on oceanic archipelagos. However, while allopatric speciation among islands is documented for this genus, the role of intra-island speciation due to population divergence by topographical isolation or ecological heterogeneity has not yet been addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate intraspecific genetic structures and to identify spatial and ecological drivers of genetic population differentiation on the island scale. We analyzed inter...

Data from: Exploiting mycorrhizas in broad daylight: partial mycoheterotrophy is a common nutritional strategy in meadow orchids.

Julienne M.I. Schiebold, Martin I. Bidartondo, Florian Lenhard, Andreas Makiola, Gerhard Gebauer & Julienne M.-I. Schiebold
Partial mycoheterotrophy (PMH) is a nutritional mode in which plants utilize organic matter, i.e. carbon, both from photosynthesis and a fungal source. The latter reverses the direction of plant-to-fungus carbon flow as usually assumed in mycorrhizal mutualisms. Based on significant enrichment in the heavy isotope 13C, a growing number of PMH orchid species have been identified. These PMH orchids are mostly associated with fungi simultaneously forming ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. In contrast, the much more...

Data from: Release from prey preservation behavior via prey switch allowed diversification of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles in digger wasps

Mareike Wurdack, Carlo Polidori, Alexander Keller, Heike Feldhaar & Thomas Schmitt
The cuticle of insects is covered by a layer of hydrocarbons (CHCs), whose original function is the protection from desiccation and pathogens. However, in most insects CHC profiles are species-specific. While this variability among species was largely linked to communication and recognition functions, additional selective forces may shape insect CHC profiles. Here we show that in Philanthinae digger wasps (Crabronidae) the CHC profile co-evolved with a peculiar brood-care strategy. In particular, we found that the...

Data from: Do microplastic particles affect Daphnia magna at the morphological, life history and molecular level?

Hannes Imhof, Jakub Rusek, Michaela Thiel, Justyna Wolinska, Christian Laforsch & Hannes K. Imhof
Microplastic particles are ubiquitous not only in marine but also in freshwater ecosystems. However, the impacts of microplastics, consisting of a large variety of synthetic polymers, on freshwater organisms remains poorly understood. We examined the effects of two polymer mixtures on the morphology, life history and on the molecular level of the waterflea Daphnia magna (three different clones). Microplastic particles of ~40 µm were supplied at a low concentration (1% of the food particles) leading...

Data from: Seed-dispersal networks respond differently to resource effects in open and forest habitats

Maximilian G. R. Vollstaedt, Stefan W. Ferger, Andreas Hemp, Kim M. Howell, Katrin Böhning-Gaese & Matthias Schleuning
While patterns in species diversity have been well studied across large-scale environmental gradients, little is known about how species' interaction networks change in response to abiotic and biotic factors across such gradients. Here we studied seed-dispersal networks on 50 study plots distributed over ten different habitat types on the southern slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania, to disentangle the effects of climate, habitat structure, fruit diversity and fruit availability on different measures of interaction diversity. We...

Mycoheterotrophic plants living on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are generally enriched in 13C, 15N, and 2H isotopes

Vincent Merckx, Sofia Gomes, Judith Kehl & Gerhard Gebauer
Fully mycoheterotrophic plants are thought to obtain carbon exclusively from their root-associated fungal partners. The general enrichment of these plants in the heavy isotopes 13C and 15N suggests that fungi are the main nutrient source for these plants. Yet, the majority of studies have targeted mycoheterotrophic plants associated with ectomycorrhizal, orchid mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi, while mycoheterotrophic plants living on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi remain understudied. Here, we sampled 13 species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fully mycoheterotrophic...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    23
  • 2020
    24
  • 2019
    4
  • 2018
    3
  • 2017
    12
  • 2016
    1
  • 2015
    6
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    1
  • 2012
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    70
  • Text
    8

Affiliations

  • University of Bayreuth
    77
  • University of Hohenheim
    6
  • University of Würzburg
    4
  • University of Alberta
    4
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    4
  • University of Camerino
    3
  • University of La Laguna
    3
  • University of Bern
    3
  • University of Tübingen
    3
  • University of Helsinki
    3