23 Works

Data from: Closely coupled evolutionary history of ecto- and endosymbionts from two distantly related animal phyla

Judith Zimmermann, Cecilia Wentrup, Miriam Sadowski, Anna Blazejak, Harald R. Gruber-Vodicka, Manuel Kleiner, Joerg A. Ott, Bodil Cronholm, Pierre De Wit, Christer Erséus & Nicole Dubilier
The level of integration between associated partners can range from ectosymbioses to extracellular and intracellular endosymbioses, and this range has been assumed to reflect a continuum from less intimate to evolutionarily highly stable associations. In this study, we examined the specificity and evolutionary history of marine symbioses in a group of closely related sulphur-oxidizing bacteria, called Candidatus Thiosymbion, that have established ecto- and endosymbioses with two distantly related animal phyla, Nematoda and Annelida. Intriguingly, in...

Additional file 1 of Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Additional file 1: Table S1. Proteins and accession numbers. Table S2. Bacterial strains. Table S3. M9-mineral media d-glucose composition. Table S4. M9-mineral media additives. Table S5. Primer list. Figure S1. Sugar composition of the cultivation media. Figure S2. SDS-PAGE of F. agariphila KMM3901T enzymes expressed recombinantly in E. coli. Figure S3. Consumption of 5-dehydro-4-deoxy-d-glucuronate from B. licheniformis DSM13 during cultivation. Figure S4. Growth of B. licheniformis DSM13 on different ulvan hydrolysates. Figure S5. B. licheniformis...

Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Abstract Background Marine algae are responsible for half of the global primary production, converting carbon dioxide into organic compounds like carbohydrates. Particularly in eutrophic waters, they can grow into massive algal blooms. This polysaccharide rich biomass represents a cheap and abundant renewable carbon source. In nature, the diverse group of polysaccharides is decomposed by highly specialized microbial catabolic systems. We elucidated the complete degradation pathway of the green algae-specific polysaccharide ulvan in previous studies using...

Data from: Evidence for water-mediated mechanisms in coral–algal interactions

Hendrikje Jorissen, Christina Skinner, Ronald Osinga, Dirk De Beer & Maggy M. Nugues
Although many coral reefs have shifted from coral-to-algal dominance, the consequence of such a transition for coral–algal interactions and their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. At the microscale, it is unclear how diffusive boundary layers (DBLs) and surface oxygen concentrations at the coral–algal interface vary with algal competitors and competitiveness. Using field observations and microsensor measurements in a flow chamber, we show that coral (massive Porites) interfaces with thick turf algae, macroalgae, and cyanobacteria, which...

The BenBioDen database, a global database for meio-, macro- and megabenthic biomass and densities

Tanja Stratmann, Dick Van Oevelen, Pedro Martínez Arbizu, Chih-Lin Wei, Jian-Xiang Liao, Mathieu Cusson, Ricardo A. Scrosati, Philippe Archambault, Paul V. R. Snelgrove, Patricia A. Ramey-Balci, Brenda J. Burd, Ellen Kenchington, Kent Gilkinson, Rénald Belley & Karline Soetaert
Benthic fauna refers to all fauna that live in or on the seafloor, which researchers typically divide into size classes meiobenthos (32/ 64 µm – 0.5/ 1 mm), macrobenthos (250 µm – 1 cm), and megabenthos (> 1 cm). Benthic fauna play important roles in bioturbation activity, mineralization of organic matter, and in marine food webs. Evaluating their role in these ecosystem functions requires knowledge of their global distribution and biomass. We therefore established the...

The gut microbiome variability of a butterflyfish increases on severely degraded Caribbean reefs

Friederike Clever, Jade M. Sourisse, Richard F. Preziosi, Jonathan A. Eisen, E. Catalina Rodriguez-Guerra, Jarrod J. Scott, Laetitia G.E. Wilkins, Andrew H. Altieri, W. Owen McMillan & Matthieu Leray
Environmental degradation has the potential to alter key mutualisms that underlie the structure and function of ecological communities. How microbial communities associated with fishes vary across populations and in relation to habitat characteristics remains largely unknown despite their fundamental roles in host nutrition and immunity. We find significant differences in the gut microbiome composition of a facultative coral-feeding butterflyfish (Chaetodon capistratus) across Caribbean reefs that differ markedly in live coral cover (∼0–30%). Fish gut microbiomes...

Additional file 2 of Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Additional file 2: Table S6. Summary of the proteomic results.

Data from: Succession and dynamics of Pristionchus nematodes and their microbiome during decomposition of Oryctes beetles on La Réunion Island

Jan M. Meyer, Praveen Baskaran, Christian Quast, Vladislav Susoy, Christian Rödelsperger, Frank Oliver Glöckner & Ralf J. Sommer
Insects and nematodes represent the most species-rich animal taxa and they occur together in a variety of associations. Necromenic nematodes of the genus Pristionchus are found on scarab beetles with more than 30 species known from worldwide samplings. However, little is known about the dynamics and succession of nematodes and bacteria during the decomposition of beetle carcasses. Here, we study nematode and bacterial succession of the decomposing rhinoceros beetle Oryctes borbonicus on La Réunion Island....

Data from: Specificity in diversity: single origin of a widespread ciliate-bacteria symbiosis

Brandon K.B. Seah, Thomas Schwaha, Jean-Marie Volland, Bruno Huettel, Nicole Dubilier & Harald R. Gruber-Vodicka
Symbioses between eukaryotes and sulfur-oxidizing (thiotrophic) bacteria have convergently evolved multiple times. Although well described in at least eight classes of metazoan animals, almost nothing is known about the evolution of thiotrophic symbioses in microbial eukaryotes (protists). In this study, we characterized the symbioses between mouthless marine ciliates of the genus Kentrophoros, and their thiotrophic bacteria, using comparative sequence analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Ciliate small-subunit rRNA sequences were obtained from 17 morphospecies collected...

Additional file 2 of Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Additional file 2: Table S6. Summary of the proteomic results.

Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Abstract Background Marine algae are responsible for half of the global primary production, converting carbon dioxide into organic compounds like carbohydrates. Particularly in eutrophic waters, they can grow into massive algal blooms. This polysaccharide rich biomass represents a cheap and abundant renewable carbon source. In nature, the diverse group of polysaccharides is decomposed by highly specialized microbial catabolic systems. We elucidated the complete degradation pathway of the green algae-specific polysaccharide ulvan in previous studies using...

Data from: Identification of habitat-specific biomes of aquatic fungal communities using a comprehensive nearly full-length 18S rRNA dataset enriched with contextual data

Katrin Panzer, Pelin Yilmaz, Michael Weiß, Lothar Reich, Michael Richter, Jutta Wiese, Rolf Schmaljohann, Antje Labes, Johannes F. Imhoff, Frank Oliver Glöckner & Marlis Reich
Molecular diversity surveys have demonstrated that aquatic fungi are highly diverse, and that they play fundamental ecological roles in aquatic systems. Unfortunately, comparative studies of aquatic fungal communities are few and far between, due to the scarcity of adequate datasets. We combined all publicly available fungal 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequences with new sequence data from a marine fungi culture collection. We further enriched this dataset by adding validated contextual data. Specifically, we included...

Manganknollen-Abbau gefährdet die Ökosysteme der Tiefsee

Felix Janßen, Tobias Reiner Vonnahme & Matthias Haeckel
Die Versorgung der globalen Wirtschaft mit Metallen für Hightech-Produkte könnte auch vom Tiefseebergbau abhängen. Das ist aber problematisch.

Additional file 1 of Fidelity varies in the symbiosis between a gutless marine worm and its microbial consortium

Yui Sato, Juliane Wippler, Cecilia Wentrup, Rebecca Ansorge, Miriam Sadowski, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Nicole Dubilier & Manuel Kleiner
Additional file 1: Supplementary text: 1.1. Quantification and detection of symbionts based on single-copy marker genes. 1.2. Assessment of symbiont community compositions based on 16S rRNA genes. 1.3. Symbiont 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated linkage between host mitochondrial haplotypes and Candidatus Thiosymbion. 1.4. Reconstruction of mitochondria and symbiont phylogenies using a deterministic genotyping approach to SNP-identification. 1.5. Estimation of the effective population size of symbionts within an Olavius algarvensis individual based on genome-wide SNP abundance....

Additional file 1 of Fidelity varies in the symbiosis between a gutless marine worm and its microbial consortium

Yui Sato, Juliane Wippler, Cecilia Wentrup, Rebecca Ansorge, Miriam Sadowski, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Nicole Dubilier & Manuel Kleiner
Additional file 1: Supplementary text: 1.1. Quantification and detection of symbionts based on single-copy marker genes. 1.2. Assessment of symbiont community compositions based on 16S rRNA genes. 1.3. Symbiont 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated linkage between host mitochondrial haplotypes and Candidatus Thiosymbion. 1.4. Reconstruction of mitochondria and symbiont phylogenies using a deterministic genotyping approach to SNP-identification. 1.5. Estimation of the effective population size of symbionts within an Olavius algarvensis individual based on genome-wide SNP abundance....

Fidelity varies in the symbiosis between a gutless marine worm and its microbial consortium

Yui Sato, Juliane Wippler, Cecilia Wentrup, Rebecca Ansorge, Miriam Sadowski, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Nicole Dubilier & Manuel Kleiner
Abstract Background Many animals live in intimate associations with a species-rich microbiome. A key factor in maintaining these beneficial associations is fidelity, defined as the stability of associations between hosts and their microbiota over multiple host generations. Fidelity has been well studied in terrestrial hosts, particularly insects, over longer macroevolutionary time. In contrast, little is known about fidelity in marine animals with species-rich microbiomes at short microevolutionary time scales, that is at the level of...

Fidelity varies in the symbiosis between a gutless marine worm and its microbial consortium

Yui Sato, Juliane Wippler, Cecilia Wentrup, Rebecca Ansorge, Miriam Sadowski, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Nicole Dubilier & Manuel Kleiner
Abstract Background Many animals live in intimate associations with a species-rich microbiome. A key factor in maintaining these beneficial associations is fidelity, defined as the stability of associations between hosts and their microbiota over multiple host generations. Fidelity has been well studied in terrestrial hosts, particularly insects, over longer macroevolutionary time. In contrast, little is known about fidelity in marine animals with species-rich microbiomes at short microevolutionary time scales, that is at the level of...

Data from: Deep mitochondrial origin outside the sampled alphaproteobacteria

Joran Martijn, Julian Vosseberg, Lionel Guy, Pierre Offre & Thijs J.G. Ettema
Mitochondria are ATP-generating organelles whose endosymbiotic origin has been a key event in the evolution of eukaryotic cells. Despite overwhelming phylogenetic evidence for an alphaproteobacterial ancestry, efforts to pinpoint the closest relatives among the sampled alphaproteobacteria have been conflicting, complicating detailed inferences about the identity and nature of the mitochondrial ancestor. While most studies support that mitochondria evolved from an ancestor related to Rickettsiales, an order that includes several host-associated pathogenic and endosymbiotic lineages, others...

Data from: Support for a clade of Placozoa and Cnidaria in genes with minimal compositional bias

Christopher E. Laumer, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Michael G. Hadfield, Vicki B. Pearse, Ana Riesgo, John C. Marioni & Gonzalo Giribet
The phylogenetic placement of the morphologically simple placozoans is crucial to understanding the evolution of complex animal traits. Here, we examine the influence of adding new genomes from placozoans to a large dataset designed to study the deepest splits in the animal phylogeny. Using site-heterogeneous substitution models, we show that it is possible to obtain strong support, in both amino acid and reduced-alphabet matrices, for either a sister-group relationship between Cnidaria and Placozoa, or for...

Nocturnal dissolved organic matter release by turf algae and its role in the microbialization of reefs

Mueller Benjamin, Hannah Brocke, Forest Rohwer, Thorsten Dittmar, Jef Huisman, Mark Vermeij & Jasper De Goeij
The increased release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by algae has been associated with the fast but inefficient growth of opportunistic microbial pathogens and the ongoing degradation of coral reefs. Turf algae (consortia of micro- and macroalgae commonly including cyanobacteria) dominate benthic communities on many reefs worldwide. Opposite to other reef algae that predominantly release DOM during the day, turf algae containing cyanobacteria may additionally release large amounts of DOM at night. However, this night-DOM...

Additional file 1 of Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Additional file 1: Table S1. Proteins and accession numbers. Table S2. Bacterial strains. Table S3. M9-mineral media d-glucose composition. Table S4. M9-mineral media additives. Table S5. Primer list. Figure S1. Sugar composition of the cultivation media. Figure S2. SDS-PAGE of F. agariphila KMM3901T enzymes expressed recombinantly in E. coli. Figure S3. Consumption of 5-dehydro-4-deoxy-d-glucuronate from B. licheniformis DSM13 during cultivation. Figure S4. Growth of B. licheniformis DSM13 on different ulvan hydrolysates. Figure S5. B. licheniformis...

Additional file 3 of Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Additional file 3: Table S7. Results of statistical analyses.

Additional file 3 of Metabolic engineering enables Bacillus licheniformis to grow on the marine polysaccharide ulvan

Theresa Dutschei, Marie-Katherin Zühlke, Norma Welsch, Tom Eisenack, Maximilian Hilkmann, Joris Krull, Carlo Stühle, Stefan Brott, Alexandra Dürwald, Lukas Reisky, Jan-Hendrik Hehemann, Dörte Becher, Thomas Schweder & Uwe T. Bornscheuer
Additional file 3: Table S7. Results of statistical analyses.

Registration Year

  • 2022
    14
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  • 2015
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14
  • Text
    5
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    4

Affiliations

  • Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology
    23
  • University of Bremen
    10
  • University of Greifswald
    8
  • Institute of Marine Biotechnology
    8
  • Quadram Institute
    4
  • North Carolina State University
    4
  • Tokyo University of Agriculture
    4
  • GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
    2
  • University of Vienna
    2
  • Plymouth University
    1