6 Works

Data from: Multi-modal defenses in aphids offer redundant protection and increased costs likely impeding a protective mutualism

Adam J. Martinez, Matthew R. Doremus, Laura J. Kraft, Kyungsun L. Kim & Kerry M. Oliver
1.The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, maintains extreme variation in resistance to its most common parasitoid wasp enemy, Aphidius ervi, which is sourced from two known mechanisms: protective bacterial symbionts, most commonly Hamiltonella defensa, or endogenously encoded defenses. We have recently found that individual aphids may employ each defense individually, occasionally both defenses together, or neither. 2.In field populations, Hamiltonella-infected aphids are found at low to moderate frequencies and while less is known about the frequency...

Data from: The population genomics of archaeological transition in west Iberia: investigation of ancient substructure using imputation and haplotype-based methods

Rui Martiniano, Lara M. Cassidy, Ros Ó'Maoldúin, Russell McLaughlin, Nuno M. Silva, Licinio Manco, Daniel Fidalgo, Tania Pereira, Maria J. Coelho, Miguel Serra, Joachim Burger, Rui Parreira, Elena Moran, Antonio C. Valera, Eduardo Porfirio, Rui Boaventura, Ana M. Silva & Daniel G. Bradley
We analyse new genomic data (0.05–2.95x) from 14 ancient individuals from Portugal distributed from the Middle Neolithic (4200–3500 BC) to the Middle Bronze Age (1740–1430 BC) and impute genomewide diploid genotypes in these together with published ancient Eurasians. While discontinuity is evident in the transition to agriculture across the region, sensitive haplotype-based analyses suggest a significant degree of local hunter-gatherer contribution to later Iberian Neolithic populations. A more subtle genetic influx is also apparent in...

Data from: When earwig mothers do not care to share: parent-offspring competition and the evolution of family life

Jos Kramer, Maximilian Körner, Janina Diehl, Christine Scheiner, Aytül Yüksel-Dadak, Teresa Christl, Philip Kohlmeier, Joël Meunier & Janina M. C. Diehl
1. Kin competition often reduces – and sometimes entirely negates – the benefits of cooperation among relatives, and hence is often regarded as central process in social evolution. Surprisingly, however, our understanding of the role of kin competition in the evolution of family life remains fragmentary, despite the close scrutiny it received in studies on sibling rivarly. This is because much less attention has been given to local competition between parents and their offspring, and...

Data from: How ants acclimate: impact of climatic conditions on the cuticular hydrocarbon profile

Florian Menzel, Miriam Zumbusch & Barbara Feldmeyer
1. Organisms from temperate zones are exposed to seasonal changes and must be able to cope with a wide range of climatic conditions. Especially ectotherms, including insects, are at risk to desiccate under dry and warm conditions, the more so given the changing climate. 2. To adjust to current conditions, organisms acclimate through changes in physiology, morphology and/or behaviour. Insects protect themselves against desiccation through a layer of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC) on their body surface....

Data from: Burying beetles regulate the microbiome of carcasses and use it to transmit a core microbiota to their offspring

Shantanu P. Shukla, Heiko Vogel, David G. Heckel, Andreas Vilcinskas & Martin Kaltenpoth
Necrophagous beetles utilize carrion, a highly nutritious resource that is susceptible to intense microbial competition, by treating it with antimicrobial anal and oral secretions. However, how this regulates the carcass microbiota remains unclear. Here, we show that carcasses prepared by the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides undergo significant changes in their microbial communities subsequent to their burial and ‘preparation’. Prepared carcasses hosted a microbial community that was more similar to that of beetles’ anal and oral...

Data from: Parallel diversifications of Cremastosperma and Mosannona (Annonaceae), tropical rainforest trees tracking Neogene upheaval of South America

Michael D. Pirie, Paul J.M. Maas, Rutger A. Wilschut, Heleen Melchers-Sharrott & Lars W. Chatrou
Much of the immense present day biological diversity of Neotropical rainforests originated from the Miocene onwards, a period of geological and ecological upheaval in South America. We assess the impact of the Andean orogeny, drainage of lake Pebas, and closure of the Panama Isthmus on two clades of tropical trees (Cremastosperma, c. 31 spp.; and Mosannona, c. 14 spp.; both Annonaceae). Phylogenetic inference revealed similar patterns of geographically restricted clades and molecular dating showed diversifications...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz
    6
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of Algarve
    1
  • Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    1
  • University of Geneva
    1
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    1
  • Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
    1
  • University of Giessen
    1