303 Works

Additional file 2 of PI3K/AKT signaling allows for MAPK/ERK pathway independency mediating dedifferentiation-driven treatment resistance in melanoma

Eyleen Corrales, Ella Levit-Zerdoun, Patrick Metzger, Ralf Mertes, Ariane Lehmann, Julia Münch, Steffen Lemke, Silke Kowar & Melanie Boerries
Additional file 1. Table S1. Normalized gene expression in MaMel cell lines.

Additional file 2 of PI3K/AKT signaling allows for MAPK/ERK pathway independency mediating dedifferentiation-driven treatment resistance in melanoma

Eyleen Corrales, Ella Levit-Zerdoun, Patrick Metzger, Ralf Mertes, Ariane Lehmann, Julia Münch, Steffen Lemke, Silke Kowar & Melanie Boerries
Additional file 1. Table S1. Normalized gene expression in MaMel cell lines.

Additional file 5 of PI3K/AKT signaling allows for MAPK/ERK pathway independency mediating dedifferentiation-driven treatment resistance in melanoma

Eyleen Corrales, Ella Levit-Zerdoun, Patrick Metzger, Ralf Mertes, Ariane Lehmann, Julia Münch, Steffen Lemke, Silke Kowar & Melanie Boerries
Additional file 4. Table S4A, B. Genes up- and down-regulated with increasing resistance in MaMel cell lines.

Data from: Metabarcoding of trap nests reveals differential impact of urbanization on cavity-nesting bee and wasp communities

Ellen Dürrbaum, Felix Fornoff, Christoph Scherber, Eero Vesterinen & Bernhard Eitzinger
Urbanization is affecting arthropod communities worldwide, for example by changing the availability of food resources. However, the strength and direction of a community’s response are species-specific and depend on the species’ trophic level. Here, we investigated interacting species at different trophic levels in nests of cavity-nesting bees and wasps along two urbanization gradients in four German cities using trap nests. We analyzed bee and wasp diversity and their trophic interaction partners by metabarcoding the DNA...

Data from: The smell of parents: breeding status influences cuticular hydrocarbon pattern in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Sandra Steiger, Klaus Peschke, Wittko Francke & Josef K. Müller
The waxy layer of the cuticle has been shown to play a fundamental role in recognition systems of insects. The biparental burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides is known to have the ability to discriminate between breeding and non-breeding conspecifics and also here cuticular substances could function as recognition cue. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the pattern of cuticular lipids can reflect the breeding status of a beetle or of any other insect. With...

Data from: Climate impacts on trans-ocean dispersal and habitat in gray whales from the Pleistocene to 2100

S. Elizabeth Alter, Matthias Meyer, Klaas Post, Paul Czechowski, Peter Gravlund, Cork Gaines, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Kristin Kaschner, Samuel T. Turvey, Johannes Van Der Plicht, Beth Shapiro & Michael Hofreiter
Arctic animals face dramatic habitat alteration due to ongoing climate change. Understanding how such species have responded to past glacial cycles can help us forecast their response to today's changing climate. Gray whales are among those marine species likely to be strongly affected by Arctic climate change, but a thorough analysis of past climate impacts on this species has been complicated by lack of information about an extinct population in the Atlantic. While little is...

Data from: Natural habitat does not mediate vertebrate seed predation as an ecosystem dis-service to agriculture

Jessica Schäckermann, Yael Mandelik, Noam Weiss, Henrik Von Wehrden & Alexandra-Maria Klein
1. Spillover of beneficial organisms from natural habitats to croplands can improve agro-ecosystem services, but wildlife can also negatively influence agricultural production. When managing agricultural landscapes to conserve biodiversity, we need to understand if the availability of natural habitats increases ecosystem dis-services such as vertebrate seed predation to avoid risking higher costs than benefits. 2. We studied whether vertebrates and their impact in crop seed predation are related to the percentage of natural (Chaparral) and...

Data from: Rapid species-level identification of vaginal and oral lactobacilli using MALDI-TOF MS analysis and 16S rDNA sequencing

Annette Carola Anderson, Mohamed Sanunu, Christian Schneider, Andreas Clad, Lamprini Karygianni, Elmar Hellwig & Ali P. D. Al-Ahmad
Background: Lactobacillus represents a large genus with different implications for the human host. Specific lactobacilli are considered to maintain vaginal health and to protect from urogenital infection. The presence of Lactobacillus species in carious lesions on the other hand is associated with progressive caries. Despite their clinical significance, species-level identification of lactobacilli still poses difficulties and mostly involves a combination of different phenotypic and genotypic methods. This study evaluated rapid MALDI-TOF MS analysis of vaginal...

Data from: Gene transfer from bacteria and archaea facilitated evolution of an extremophilic eukaryote

Gerald Schönknecht, Wei-Hua Chen, Chad M. Ternes, Guillaume G. Barbier, Roshan P. Shrestha, Mario Stanke, Andrea Bräutigam, Brett J. Baker, Jillian F. Banfield, R. Michael Garavito, Kevin Carr, Curtis Wilkerson, Stefan A. Rensing, David Gagneul, Nicholas E. Dickenson, Christine Oesterhelt, Martin J. Lercher & Andreas P. M. Weber
Some microbial eukaryotes, such as the extremophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria, can live in hot, toxic metal-rich, acidic environments. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of adaptation, we sequenced the 13.7 Mb genome of G. sulphuraria. This alga shows an enormous metabolic flexibility, growing either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on more than 50 carbon sources. Environmental adaptation seems to have been facilitated by horizontal gene transfer from various bacteria and archaea, often followed by gene family...

Data from: Tree phylogenetic diversity promotes host–parasitoid interactions

Michael Staab, Helge Bruelheide, Walter Durka, Stefan Michalski, Oliver Purschke, Chao-Dong Zhu & Alexandra-Maria Klein
Evidence from grassland experiments suggests that a plant community's phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a strong predictor of ecosystem processes, even stronger than species richness per se. This has, however, never been extended to species-rich forests and host–parasitoid interactions. We used cavity-nesting Hymenoptera and their parasitoids collected in a subtropical forest as a model system to test whether hosts, parasitoids, and their interactions are influenced by tree PD and a comprehensive set of environmental variables, including...

Data from: N/P imbalance as a key driver for the invasion of oligothrophic dune systems by a woody legume

Florian Ulm, Christine Hellmann, Cristina Cruz & Cristina Máguas
Oligotrophic ecosystems, previously considered to be more resilient to invasive plants, are now recognised to be highly vulnerable to invasions. In these systems, woody legumes show belowground ecosystem engineering characteristics that enable invasion, however, the underlying processes are not well understood. Using a Portuguese primary dune ecosystem as an oligotrophic model system, belowground biomass pools, turnover rates and stoichiometry of a native (Stauracanthus spectabilis) and an invasive legume (Acacia longifolia) were compared and related to...

Data from: Effects of management on aquatic tree-hole communities in temperate forests are mediated by detritus amount and water chemistry

Martin M. Gossner, Peggy Lade, Anja Rohland, Nora Sichardt, Tiemo Kahl, Jürgen Bauhus, Wolfgang W. Weisser & Jana S. Petermann
1. Arthropod communities in water-filled tree-holes may be sensitive to impacts of forest management, for example via changes in environmental conditions such as resource input. 2. We hypothesized that increasing forest management intensity negatively affects arthropod abundance and richness and shifts community composition and trophic structure of tree-hole communities. We predicted that this shift is caused by reduced habitat and resource availability at the forest stand scale as well as reduced tree-hole size, detritus amount...

Data from: The impact of even-aged and uneven-aged forest management on regional biodiversity of multiple taxa in European beech forests

Peter Schall, Martin M. Gossner, Steffi Heinrichs, Markus Fischer, Steffen Boch, Daniel Prati, Kirsten Jung, Vanessa Baumgartner, Stefan Blaser, Stefan Böhm, Francois Buscot, Rolf Daniel, Kezia Goldmann, Kirstin Kaiser, Tiemo Kahl, Markus Lange, Jörg Müller, Jörg Overmann, Swen C. Renner, Ernst-Detlef Schulze, Johannes Sikorski, Marco Tschapka, Manfred Türke, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Bernd Wemheuer … & Kristin Kaiser
For managed temperate forests, conservationists and policymakers favour fine-grained uneven-aged management over more traditional coarse-grained even-aged management, based on the assumption that within-stand habitat heterogeneity enhances biodiversity. There is, however, little empirical evidence to support this assumption. We investigated for the first time how differently grained forest management systems affect the biodiversity of multiple above- and below-ground taxa across spatial scales. We sampled 15 taxa of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria within the largest contiguous...

Data from: Cross-validation strategies for data with temporal, spatial, hierarchical, or phylogenetic structure

David R. Roberts, Volker Bahn, Simone Ciuti, Mark S. Boyce, Jane Elith, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Severin Hauenstein, José J. Lahoz-Monfort, Boris Schröder, Wilfried Thuiller, David I. Warton, Brendan A. Wintle, Florian Hartig & Carsten F. Dormann
Ecological data often show temporal, spatial, hierarchical (random effects), or phylogenetic structure. Modern statistical approaches are increasingly accounting for such dependencies. However, when performing cross-validation, these structures are regularly ignored, resulting in serious underestimation of predictive error. One cause for the poor performance of uncorrected (random) cross-validation, noted often by modellers, are dependence structures in the data that persist as dependence structures in model residuals, violating the assumption of independence. Even more concerning, because often...

Data from: Land use intensity indirectly affects ecosystem services mainly through plant functional identity in a temperate forest

Verónica Chillo, Diego P. Vázquez, Mariano M. Amoroso & Elena M. Bennett
1.Land-use change is known to affect biodiversity, and there is increasing concern regarding how these changes may impact the provision of ecosystem services. Although functional composition (diversity and identity) could influence ecosystem properties and services at the community level, there is little quantitative understanding of these relationships in the field. Here, we evaluate the direct and indirect effects (through ecosystem properties) of biodiversity on the provision of multiple ecosystem services in native mixed forest in...

Data from: Environmental drivers of forest structure and stem turnover across Venezuelan tropical forests

Emilio Vilanova, Hirma Ramirez-Angulo, Armando Torres-Lezama, Gerardo Aymard, Luis Gámez, Cristabel Durán, Lionel Hernández, Rafael Herrera, Geertje Van Der Heijden, Oliver L. Phillips & Gregory J. Ettl
Using data from 50 long-term permanent plots from across Venezuelan forests in northern South America, we explored large-scale patterns of stem turnover, aboveground biomass (AGB) and woody productivity (AGWP), and the relationships between them and with potential climatic drivers. We used principal component analysis coupled with generalized least squares models to analyze the relationship between climate, forest structure and stem dynamics. Two major axes associated with orthogonal temperature and moisture gradients effectively described more than...

Data from: Phoretic Poecilochirus mites specialise on their burying beetle hosts

Volker Nehring, Josef K. Müller & Nadine Steinmetz
Recurring species interactions can cause species to adapt to each other. Specialization will increase the fitness of symbionts in the coevolved association but may reduce the flexibility of symbiont choice as it will often decrease fitness in interactions with other than the main symbiont species. We analyzed the fitness interactions between a complex of two cryptic mite species and their sympatric burying beetle hosts in a European population. Poecilochirus mites (Mesostigmata, Parasitidae) are phoretic on...

Data from: Refuges from fire maintain pollinator-plant interaction networks

Opeyemi Adedoja, Carsten F. Dormann, Temitope Kehinde & Michael J. Samways
Fire is a major disturbance factor in many terrestrial ecosystems, leading to landscape transformation in fire‐prone areas. Species in mutualistic interactions are often highly sensitive to disturbances like fire events, but the degree and complexity of their responses are unclear. We use bipartite insect–flower interaction networks across a recently burned landscape to explore how plant–pollinator interaction networks respond to a recent major fire event at the landscape level, and where fire refuges were present. We...

Data from: The interplay of landscape composition and configuration: new pathways to manage functional biodiversity and agro-ecosystem services across Europe

Emily A. Martin, Matteo Dainese, Yann Clough, András Báldi, Riccardo Bommarco, Vesna Gagic, Michael Garratt, Andrea Holzschuh, David Kleijn, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Lorenzo Marini, Simon G. Potts, Henrik G. Smith, Diab Al Hassan, Matthias Albrecht, Georg K. S. Andersson, Josep Asis, Stephanie Aviron, Mario Balzan, Laura Baños-Picón, Ignasi Bartomeus, Peter Batary, Françoise Burel, Berta Caballero-López, Elena D. Concepcion … & Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Managing agricultural landscapes to support biodiversity and ecosystem services is a key aim of a sustainable agriculture. However, how the spatial arrangement of crop fields and other habitats in landscapes impacts arthropods and their functions is poorly known. Synthesising data from 49 studies (1515 landscapes) across Europe, we examined effects of landscape composition (% habitats) and configuration (edge density) on arthropods in fields and their margins, pest control, pollination and yields. Configuration effects interacted with...

Data from: Impacts of species richness on productivity in a large-scale subtropical forest experiment

Yuanyuan Huang, Yuxin Chen, Nadia Castro-Izaguirre, Martin Baruffol, Matteo Brezzi, Anne Lang, Ying Li, Werner Härdtle, Werner Von Oheimb, Xuefeu Yang, Xiaojuan Liu, Kequan Pei, Sabine Both, Bo Yang, David Eichenberg, Thorsten Assmann, Jürgen Bauhus, Thorsten Behrens, François Buscot, Xiao-Yong Chen, Douglas Chester, Bing-Yang Ding, Walter Durka, Alexandra Erfmeier, Jingyun Fang … & Bernhard Schmid
Biodiversity experiments have shown that species loss reduces ecosystem functioning in grassland. To test whether this result can be extrapolated to forests, the main contributors to terrestrial primary productivity, requires large-scale experiments. We manipulated tree species richness by planting more than 150,000 trees in plots with 1 to 16 species. Simulating multiple extinction scenarios, we found that richness strongly increased stand-level productivity. After 8 years, 16-species mixtures had accumulated over twice the amount of carbon...

Data from: Presynaptic GABAB receptors functionally uncouple somatostatin interneurons from the active hippocampal network

Sam A. Booker, Harumi Harada, Claudio Elguate, Julia Bank, Bartos Marlene, Akos Kulik & Imre Vida
Information processing in cortical neuronal networks relies on properly balanced excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. A ubiquitous motif for maintaining this balance is the somatostatin interneuron (SOM-IN) feedback microcircuit. Here, we investigate the modulation of this microcircuit by presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) in the rat hippocampus. Whole-cell recordings from SOM-INs reveal that both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs are strongly inhibited by GABABRs, while optogenetic activation of the interneurons shows that their inhibitory output is also...

5.1. Gesundheitsförderung, Prävention und Rehabilitation

Julika Loss & Jürgen Bengel
Kapitel im Online Lehrbuch der Medizinischen Psychologie und Medizinischen Soziologie

Data from: High ecosystem service delivery potential of small woodlands in agricultural landscapes

Alicia Valdés, Jonathan Lenoir, Pieter De Frenne, Emilie Andrieu, Jorg Brunet, Olivier Chabrerie, Sara Cousins, Marc Deconchat, Pallieter De Smedt, Martin Diekmann, Steffen Ehrmann, Emilie Gallet-Moron, Stefanie Gaertner, Brice Giffard, Karin Hansen, Martin Hermy, Annette Kolb, Vincent Leroux, Jaan Liira, Jessica Lindgren, Ludmilla Martin, Tobias Naaf, Taavi Paal, Willem Proesmans, Michael Scherer-Lorenzen … & Guillaume Decocq
Global forest loss and fragmentation have strongly increased the frequency of forest patches smaller than a few hectares. Little is known about the biodiversity and ecosystem service supply potential of such small woodlands in comparison to larger forests. As it is widely recognized that high biodiversity levels increase ecosystem functionality and the delivery of multiple ecosystem services, small, isolated woodlands are expected to have a lower potential for ecosystem service delivery than large forests hosting...

Data from: A novel longitudinal framework aimed at improving the teaching of the neurologic examination

Katharina Bornkamm, Marius Steiert, Michel Rijntjes & Jochen Brich
Objective To develop an educational framework basis for improving the teaching of the neurologic examination (NE) by asking German neurologists to (1) identify the basic elements of the screening NE and (2) nominate the steps they would deem mandatory for medical students to master. Methods We conducted a questionnaire-based survey among neurologists working in a hospital or ambulatory setting in southwest Germany. To define the screening NE, neurologists were asked to list the NE components...

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