31 Works

Data from: Autofertility and self-compatibility moderately benefit island colonization of plants

Mialy Razanajatovo, Mark Van Kleunen, Holger Kreft, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Marten Winter & Patrick Weigelt
Aim: The current geographical distribution of species largely reflects colonization success after natural long‐distance dispersal or introduction by humans. Plants with selfing ability should have an advantage when establishing on islands where mates and pollinators are limited (Baker's law). However, high percentages of dioecious and self‐incompatible species have been reported for some islands, possibly resulting from post‐colonization evolution. Given that such evolution is less likely to apply to alien species recently introduced to islands by...

Data from: Philip Grime's fourth corner: are there plant species adapted to high disturbance and low productivity?

Tomas Herben, Jitka Klimešová & Milan Chytrý
Grime's CSR species life-strategy theory (competition-stress-ruderality) provides a conceptual framework to classify species into competitive (high productivity, low disturbance), stress-tolerant (low productivity, low disturbance) and ruderal (high productivity, high disturbance). Importantly, this classification is based on the assumption that the niche space of disturbance and productivity is filled unevenly: while in productive habitats species can adapt to different disturbance regimes, species of low-productivity and disturbed habitats do not exist, resulting in a triangular distribution of...

Data from: Interspecific competition promotes habitat and morphological divergence in a secondary contact zone between two hybridizing songbirds

Camille Sottas, Jiri Reif, Lechoslaw Kuczynski, Radka Reifova & Lechosław Kuczyński
Interspecific competition is assumed to play an important role in the ecological differentiation of species and speciation. However, empirical evidence for competition’s role in speciation remains surprisingly scarce. Here we studied the role of interspecific competition in the ecological differentiation and speciation of two closely related songbird species, the Common Nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos) and the Thrush Nightingale (L. luscinia). Both species are insectivorous and ecologically very similar. They hybridize in a secondary contact zone, which...

Data from: Polyphasic data support the splitting of Aspergillus candidus into two species; proposal of Aspergillus dobrogensis sp. nov.

Vit Hubka, Alena Nováková, Željko Jurjević, František Sklenář, Jens C. Frisvad, Jos Houbraken, Maiken C. Arendrup, João P. Z. Siqueira, Josepa Gené & Miroslav Kolařík
Aspergillus candidus is a species frequently isolated from stored grain, food, indoor environments, soil and occasionally also from clinical material. Recent bioprospecting studies highlighted the potential of using A. candidus and its relatives in various industrial sectors as a result of their significant production of enzymes and bioactive compounds. A high genetic variability was observed among A. candidus isolates originating from various European countries and the USA, that were mostly isolated from indoor environments, caves...

Data from: Interspecific transfer of parasites following a range-shift in Ficedula flycatchers

William Jones, Katarzyna Kulma, Staffan Bensch, Mariusz Cichoń, Anvar Kerimov, Miloš Krist, Toni Laaksonen, Juan Moreno, Pavel Munclinger, Fred Slater, Eszter Szöllősi, Marcel E. Visser, Anna Qvarnström & Fred M. Slater
Human-induced climate change is expected to cause major biotic changes in species distributions and thereby including escalation of novel host-parasite associations. Closely related host species that come into secondary contact are especially likely to exchange parasites and pathogens. Two competing theories, the Enemy Release Hypothesis, where invading hosts escape their original parasites; and the Novel Weapon Hypothesis, where invading hosts bring new parasites that have detrimental effects on native hosts, have been described to predict...

Data from: Across a migratory divide: divergent migration directions and non-breeding grounds of Eurasian reed warblers revealed by geolocators and stable isotopes

Petr Procházka, Vojtěch Brlík, Elizabeth Yohannes, Bert Meister, Jürgen Auerswald, Mihaela Ilieva & Steffen Hahn
Migratory divides represent narrow zones of overlap between parapatric populations with distinct migration directions and, consequently, expected divergent non-breeding distributions. The composition of the mixed population at a migratory divide and the corresponding non-breeding ranges remain, however, unknown for many Palaearctic-African migrants. Here, we used light-level geolocation to track migration direction and non-breeding grounds of Eurasian reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) from three breeding populations across the species’ migratory divide. Moreover, by using feathers grown at...

Data from: Can mixed singing facilitate coexistence of closely related nightingale species?

Abel Souriau, Hana Kohoutová, Jiri Reif, Jana Vokurková, Adam Petrusek, Radka Reifová & Tereza Petruskova
Knowledge of the mechanisms facilitating the coexistence of closely-related competing species is crucial for understanding biodiversity patterns. The concept of convergent agonistic character displacement (ACD) suggests that interspecific interference competition may lead to convergence in territorial signals between species, which helps to establish interspecific territoriality and thus facilitate the species coexistence. Despite a strong theoretical background, however, empirical evidence for convergent ACD in nature is still scarce. Here we tested whether mixed singing (i.e., copying...

Data from: Clinical correlation between erectile function and ejaculatory function in the Czech male population

Watcharaphol Alexandre Kamnerdsiri, Jesús Eugenio Rodríguez Martinez, Christopher Fox & Petr Weiss
Introduction The objective of this study is to determine whether there is any relationship between erectile function (EF) and ejaculatory function (EJF), with the aim of improving care protocols in the clinical practice. Materials and methods A total of 1004 Czech males between 15 and 84 years (42.77 ± 17.556 years) completed a sexual behavior questionnaire. A correlational, between-subjects design was used, where a 5-item abbreviated form of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5)...

Data from: Convergent morphology in Alpinieae (Zingiberaceae): recircumscribing Amomum as a monophyletic genus

Hugo De Boer, Mark Newman, Axel Dalberg Poulsen, A. Jane Droop, Tomas Fer, Le Thi Thu Hien, Kristyna Hlavata, Vichith Lamxay, James E. Richardson, Karin Steffen & Jana Leong-Škorničková
The tropical ginger genus Amomum (Zingiberaceae) has always posed challenges for classification based on morphological characters. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies showed Amomum to be paraphyletic but limited sampling and absence of the data of the type Amomum subulatum made it impossible to resolve the paraphyly and make nomenclatural changes. Here, Amomum is further investigated in a multi-marker phylogenetic framework using matK and nrITS including multiple accessions of the type, the genus Elettaria and additional accessions...

Data from: The direction of carbon and nitrogen fluxes between ramets changes during ontogeny under simulated competition for light

Jana Duchoslavová & Jan Jansa
Resource sharing is universal among connected ramets of clonal plants, and is driven both by the developmental status of ramets and resource gradients. Aboveground competition forms spatial light gradients, but the role of resource sharing in such competition is unclear. We examined translocation of resources between mother and daughter ramets of Agrostis stolonifera under light heterogeneity throughout ramet ontogeny. We labelled ramets by 13C and 15N to estimate bidirectional translocation of the resources at three...

Data from: The nest defence by the red-backed shrike (Lanius collurio) - support for the vulnerability hypothesis

Irena Strnadová, Michal Němec, Martin Strnad, Petr Veselý & Roman Fuchs
The majority of altricial bird species defend their brood against predators more intensively in nestlings rather than eggs stage. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this difference. The majority of existing experimental studies have recorded a gradually increasing intensity of nest defence supporting the reproductive value hypothesis. We have compared nest defence in two nesting stages of the red-backed shrike against two predators of adult birds and against two predators of nests. While the...

Data from: Fuel for the pace of life: baseline blood glucose concentration coevolves with life history traits in songbirds

Oldrich Tomasek, Lukas Bobek, Tereza Kralova, Marie Adamkova & Tomas Albrecht
1. It has been proposed that life histories have coevolved with a suite of physiological and behavioural adaptations, termed pace-of-life syndromes (POLS). Here, we hypothesise that basal concentration of blood glucose (G0), a major source of energy circulating in vertebrate blood, may constitute a key component of POLS. 2. To test this hypothesis, we measured G0 in 30 passerine species and tested its covariation with body mass and other life history traits. Importantly, body mass...

Data from: Living in two worlds: evolutionary mechanisms act differently in the native and introduced ranges of an invasive plant

Wen-Yong Guo, Carla Lambertini, Petr Pyšek, Laura A. Meyerson & Hans Brix
Identifying the factors that influence spatial genetic structure among populations can provide insights into the evolution of invasive plants. In this study, we used the common reed (Phragmites australis), a grass native in Europe and invading North America, to examine the relative importance of geographic, environmental (represented by climate here) and human effects on population genetic structure and its changes during invasion. We collected samples of P. australis from both the invaded North American and...

Data from: Competition-driven niche segregation on a landscape scale: evidence for escaping from syntopy toward allotopy in two coexisting sibling passerine species

Jiří Reif, Radka Reifova, Anna Skoracka & Lechosław Kuczyński
1. The role of interspecific competition for generating patterns in species’ distribution is hotly debated and studies taking into account processes occurring at both large and small spatial scales are almost missing. Theoretically, competition between species with overlapping niches should result in divergence of their niches in sympatry to reduce the costs of competition. Many species show a mosaic distribution within sympatric zones, with the syntopic sites occupied by both species, and allotopic sites where...

Data from: Around the Mediterranean: an extreme example of loop migration in a long-distance migratory passerine

Petr Klvaňa, Jaroslav Cepák, Pavel Munclinger, Romana Michálková, Oldřich Tomášek & Tomas Albrecht
An important issue in migration research is how small-bodied passerines pass over vast geographical barriers; in European-African avian migration, these are represented by the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Eastern (passing Eastern Mediterranean), central (passing Apennine Peninsula) and western (via western Mediterranean) major migration flyways are distinguished for European migratory birds. The autumn and spring migration routes may differ (loop migration) and there could be a certain level of individual flexibility in how individuals...

Data from: Flow of CO2 from soil may not correspond with CO2 concentration in soil

Jan Frouz & Luděk Bujalský
The relationship between CO2 flow from soil and soil CO2 concentration was investigated at 72 permanent sampling points at two forested post-mining sites in the northwest of the Czechia. Based on the entire data set (72 points sampled monthly during the growing season), CO2 flow from the soil was positively correlated with soil CO2 concentration. CO2 concentration in deeper soil layers was positively correlated with root biomass and negatively correlated with soil microbial respiration. In...

Data from: Flying between raindrops: strong seasonal turnover of several Lepidoptera groups in lowland rainforests of Mount Cameroon

Vincent Maicher, Szabolcs Sáfián, Mercy Murkwe, Łukasz Przybyłowicz, Štěpán Janeček, Eric B. Fokam, Tomasz Pyrcz & Robert Tropek
1. Although seasonality in the tropics is often less pronounced than in temperate areas, tropical ecosystems show seasonal dynamics as well. Nevertheless, individual tropical insects’ phenological patterns are still poorly understood, especially in the Afrotropics. To fill this gap, we investigated biodiversity patterns of Lepidoptera communities at three rainforest localities in the foothills of Mount Cameroon, West Africa, one of the wettest places in the world. 2. Our multi-taxa approach covered six lepidopteran groups (fruit-feeding...

Data from: Moderate heritability and low evolvability of sperm morphology in a species with high risk of sperm competition, the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis

Anais Edme, Petr Zobač, Peter Korsten, Tomáš Albrecht, Tim Schmoll & Miloš Krist
Spermatozoa represent the morphologically most diverse type of animal cells and show remarkable variation in size across and also within species. To understand the evolution of this diversity, it is important to reveal to what degree this variation is genetic or environmental in origin and whether this depends on species’ life‐histories. Here we applied quantitative genetic methods to a pedigreed multigenerational data set of the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis, a passerine bird with high levels...

Data from: Unravelling species boundaries in the Aspergillus viridinutans complex (section Fumigati): opportunistic human and animal pathogens capable of interspecific hybridization

Vit Hubka, Vanessa Barrs, Zuzana Dudová, František Sklenář, Alena Kubátová, Tetsuhiro Matsuzawa, Takashi Yaguchi, Yoshikazu Horie, Alena Nováková, Jens C. Frisvad, Jessica Talbot & Miroslav Kolařík
Although Aspergillus fumigatus is the major agent of invasive aspergillosis, an increasing number of infections are caused by its cryptic species, especially A. lentulus and the A. viridinutans species complex (AVSC). Their identification is clinically relevant because of antifungal drug resistance and refractory infections. Species boundaries in the AVSC are unresolved since most species have uniform morphology and produce interspecific hybrids in vitro. Clinical and environmental strains from six continents (n = 110) were characterized...

Data from: European ornamental garden flora as an invasion debt under climate change

Emily Haeuser, Wayne Dawson, Wilfried Thuiller, Stefan Dullinger, Svenja Block, Oliver Bossdorf, Marta Carboni, Luisa Conti, Iwona Dullinger, Franz Essl, Günther Klonner, Dietmar Moser, Tamara Muenkemueller, Madalin Parepa, Matthew V. Talluto, Holger Kreft, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Patrick Weigelt, Marten Winter, Martin Hermy, Sebastiaan Van Der Veken, Cristina Roquet & Mark Van Kleunen
1.Most naturalized and invasive alien plant species were originally introduced to regions for horticultural purposes. However, many regions now face an invasion debt from ornamental alien species, which have not yet naturalized. In this regard, climate change represents a threat as it may lower the barriers to naturalization for some ornamental alien species. Identifying those species is extremely important for anticipating impending invasions. 2.To identify predictors of naturalization, we modelled the effects of climate, nursery...

Data from: Letting the “cat” out of the bag: pouch young development of the extinct Tasmanian tiger revealed by X-ray computed tomography

Axel H. Newton, Frantisek Spoutil, Jan Prochazka, Jay R. Black, Kathryn Medlock, Robert N. Paddle, Marketa Knitlova, Christy A. Hipsley & Andrew J. Pask
The Tasmanian tiger or thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was an iconic Australian marsupial predator that was hunted to extinction in the early 1900s. Despite sharing striking similarities with canids, they failed to evolve many of the specialized anatomical features that characterize carnivorous placental mammals. These evolutionary limitations are thought to arise from functional constraints associated with the marsupial mode of reproduction, in which otherwise highly altricial young use their well-developed forelimbs to climb to the pouch...

Data from: DNA methylation as a possible mechanism affecting ability of natural populations to adapt to changing climate

Zuzana Munzbergova, Vit Latzel, Maria Surinova & Vera Hadincova
Environmentally induced epigenetic variation has been recently recognized as a possible mechanism allowing plants to rapidly adapt to novel conditions. Despite increasing evidence on the topic, little is known on how epigenetic variation affects responses of natural populations to changing climate. We studied the effects of experimental demethylation (DNA methylation is an important mediator of heritable control of gene expression) on performance of a clonal grass, Festuca rubra, coming from localities with contrasting temperature and...

Data from: Sperm divergence in a passerine contact zone: indication of reinforcement at the gametic level

Tomas Albrecht, Kamila Opletalova, Jiří Reif, Vaclav Janousek, Lubomir Pialek, Emily Rebecca Alison Cramer, Arild Johnsen & Radka Reifová
Postcopulatory sexual selection may promote evolutionary diversification in sperm form, but the contribution of between-species divergence in sperm morphology to the origin of reproductive isolation and speciation remains little understood. To assess the possible role of sperm diversification in reproductive isolation, we studied sperm morphology in two closely related species, the common nightingale (Luscinia megarhynchos) and the thrush nightingale (L. luscinia), that hybridize in a secondary contact zone spanning Central and Eastern Europe. We found:...

Data from: The roles of interspecific variability in seed mass and soil resource availability in root system development

Tereza Mašková & Martin Weiser
Aims Because plant roots serve mainly as organs for the uptake of water and nutrients, we aimed to test whether the development of seedling roots is influenced by the two principal nutrient sources—the substrate and the pool stored in the seed itself. Methods Using seven Fabaceae species that differ in seed mass, we observed their early root system development under four levels of nutrient availability. Transparent-wall rhizoboxes allowed us to track root development and to...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • Charles University
    31
  • University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice
    4
  • Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
    4
  • Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
    3
  • University of Konstanz
    3
  • Institute of Vertebrate Biology
    3
  • Moscow State University
    2
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    2
  • Institute of Microbiology
    2
  • Durham University
    2