38 Works

Data from: Parental habituation to human disturbance over time reduces fear of humans in coyote offspring

Christopher J. Schell, Julie K. Young, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Rachel M. Santymie, Jill M. Mateo & Rachel M. Santymire
A fundamental tenet of maternal effects assumes that maternal variance over time should have discordant consequences for offspring traits across litters. Yet, seldom are parents observed across multiple reproductive bouts, with few studies considering anthropogenic disturbances as an ecological driver of maternal effects. We observed captive coyote (Canis latrans) pairs over two successive litters to determine whether among-litter differences in behavior (i.e., risk-taking) and hormones (i.e., cortisol and testosterone) corresponded with parental plasticity in habituation....

Data from: If you build it, they may not come: modifiable barriers to patient portal use among pre- and post-kidney transplant patients

Mark Lockwood, Karen Dunn-Lopez, Heather Pauls, Larisa Burke, Sachin D. Shah, Milda A. Saunders & Mark B Lockwood
Background: Patient access to health information using electronic patient portals is increasingly common. Portal use has the potential to improve patients' engagement with their health and is particularly important for patients with chronic illness; however, patients’ abilities, attitudes, and use of portals is poorly understood. Methods: A single-center, cross-sectional survey was conducted of 240 consecutive pre- and post-kidney transplant patients of all levels of technological proficiency who presented to an urban transplant center in the...

Data from: Applying Lanchester’s laws to the interspecific competition of coral reef fish

David Černý, Kristen Lee, Jocelyn Medal & Daniel T. Blumstein
Lanchester’s laws of combat are a mathematical framework describing the relative contributions of individual fighting ability and group size to overall group fighting ability. Since 1993, several studies have attempted to apply this framework to interspecific dominance relationships between nonhuman animals. However, this prior work addressed only the corollaries of Lanchester’s laws rather than the laws themselves. Here, we directly test Lanchester’s linear and square law to explain interspecific competition of coral reef fish. First,...

Data from: Niche theory and its relation to morphology and phenotype in geographic space: a case study in woodpeckers (Picidae)

Jacob C. Cooper
Ecogeographic analyses have recovered common environmental trends with respect to morphology; however discrepancies among trends exist. Hypothesized reasons for these divergences vary, but most relate a taxon’s morphology to its ecological niche. Morphology is known to diverge when species co-occur with competitors or predators and when species occur across different habitats and environments. A less understood divergence from ecogeographic trends is niche fixation, wherein species become locked into particular niches due to their community interactions...

Data from: Co-occurring expression and methylation QTLs allow detection of common causal variants and shared biological mechanisms

Brandon L. Pierce, Lin Tong, Maria Argos, Kathryn Demanelis, Farzana Jasmine, Muhammad Rakibuz-Zaman, Golam Sarwarq, , Hasan Shahriar, Tariqul Islam, Mahfuzar Rahman, , Muhammad G. Kibriya, Lin S. Chen & Habibul Ahsan
Inherited genetic variation affects local gene expression and DNA methylation in humans. Most expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs) occur at the same genomic location as methylation QTLs (cis-meQTLs), suggesting a common causal variant and shared mechanism. Using DNA and RNA from peripheral blood of Bangladeshi individuals, here we use co-localization methods to identify eQTL-meQTL pairs likely to share a causal variant. We use partial correlation and mediation analyses to identify >400 of these pairs showing...

Data from: Energy demand and the context-dependent effects of genetic interactions underlying metabolism

Luke A. Hoekstra, Cole R. Julick, Katelyn M. Mika & Kristi L. Montooth
Genetic effects are often context-dependent, with the same genotype differentially affecting phenotypes across environments, life stages, and sexes. We used an environmental manipulation designed to increase energy demand during development to investigate energy demand as a general physiological explanation for context-dependent effects of mutations, particularly for those mutations that affect metabolism. We found that increasing the period during which Drosophila larvae are active during development phenocopies a temperature-dependent developmental delay in a mitochondrial-nuclear genotype with...

Data from: Lifespan bias explains live-dead discordance in abundance of two common bivalves

Kelly E. Cronin, Gregory P. Dietl, Patricia H. Kelley & Stewart M. Edie
Lifespan bias potentially alters species abundance in death assemblages through the overrepresentation of short-lived organisms compared to their long-lived counterparts. Although previous work found that lifespan bias did not contribute significantly to live-dead discordance in bivalve assemblages, lifespan bias better explained discordance in two groups: longer-lived bivalve species and species with known lifespans. More studies using local, rather than global, species-wide, lifespans and mortality rates would help to determine the prevalence of lifespan bias, especially...

Data from: A fish and tetrapod fauna from Romer’s gap preserved in Scottish Tournaisian floodplain deposits

Benjamin K. A. Otoo, Jennifer A. Clack, Timothy R. Smithson, Carys E. Bennett, Timothy J. Kearsey & Michael I. Coates
The end‐Devonian mass extinction has been framed as a turning point in vertebrate evolution, enabling the radiation of tetrapods, chondrichthyans and actinopterygians. Until very recently ‘Romer's Gap’ rendered the Early Carboniferous a black box standing between the Devonian and the later Carboniferous, but now new Tournaisian localities are filling this interval. Recent work has recovered unexpected tetrapod and lungfish diversity. However, the composition of Tournaisian faunas remains poorly understood. Here we report on a Tournaisian...

Data from: Ancient mechanisms for the evolution of the bicoid homeodomain's function in fly development

Qinwen Liu, Pinar Onal, Rhea R. Datta, Julia M. Rogers, Urs Schmidt-Ott, Martha L. Bulyk, Stephen Small & Joseph W. Thornton
The ancient mechanisms that caused developmental gene regulatory networks to diversify among distantly related taxa are not well understood. Here we use ancestral protein reconstruction, biochemical experiments, and developmental assays of transgenic animals carrying reconstructed ancestral genes to investigate how the transcription factor Bicoid (Bcd) evolved its central role in anterior-posterior patterning in flies. We show that most of Bcd's derived functions are attributable to evolutionary changes within its homeodomain (HD) during a phylogenetic interval...

Data from: Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine

Katrina Elizabeth Jones, K. D. Angielczyk, P. D. Polly, J. J. Head, V. Fernandez, J. K. Lungmus, S. Tulga & S. E. Pierce
A unique characteristic of mammals is a vertebral column with anatomically distinct regions, but when and how this trait evolved remains unknown. Here we reconstruct vertebral regions and their morphological disparity in the extinct forerunners of mammals, the non-mammalian synapsids, to elucidate the evolution of mammalian axial differentiation. Mapping patterns of regionalization and disparity (heterogeneity) across amniotes reveals that both traits increased during synapsid evolution. However, the onset of regionalization predates increased heterogeneity. Based on...

Data from: Coevolution-based inference of amino acid interactions underlying protein function

Victor H Salinas & Rama Ranganathan
Protein function arises from a poorly understood pattern of energetic interactions between amino acid residues. Sequence-based strategies for deducing this pattern have been proposed, but lack of benchmark data has limited experimental verification. Here, we extend deep-mutation technologies to enable measurement of many thousands of pairwise amino acid couplings in several homologs of a protein family – a deep coupling scan (DCS). The data show that cooperative interactions between residues are loaded in a sparse,...

Data from: Extinction risk in extant marine species integrating paleontological and biodistributional data

Katie S. Collins, Stewart M. Edie, Gene Hunt, Kaustuv Roy & David Jablonski
Extinction risk assessments of marine invertebrate species remain scarce, which hinders effective management of marine biodiversity in the face of anthropogenic impacts. In order to close this information gap, we developed a metric of relative extinction risk that combines paleontological data, in the form of extinction rates calculated from the fossil record, with two known correlates of risk in the modern day: geographic range size and realized thermal niche. We test the performance of this...

Data from: Female mate choice is a reproductive isolating barrier in Heliconius butterflies

Laura Southcott & Marcus R. Kronforst
In sexually reproducing organisms, speciation involves the evolution of reproductive isolating mechanisms that decrease gene flow. Premating reproductive isolation, often the result of mate choice, is a major obstacle to gene flow between species because it acts earlier in the life cycle than other isolating barriers. While female choice is often considered the default mode in animal species, research in the butterfly genus Heliconius, a frequent subject of speciation studies, has focused on male mate...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    38

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    38

Affiliations

  • University of Chicago
    38
  • Stanford University
    3
  • New York University
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Harvard University
    2
  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    2
  • California Institute of Technology
    2
  • University of the Pacific
    2
  • Boston University
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1