3 Works

Data from: Recurrent evolution of melanism in South American felids

Alexsandra Schneider, Corneliu Henegar, Kenneth Day, Devin Absher, Constanza Napolitano, Leandro Silveira, Victor A. David, Stephen J. O’Brien, Marilyn Menotti-Raymond, Gregory S. Barsh & Eduardo Eizirik
Morphological variation in natural populations is a genomic test bed for studying the interface between molecular evolution and population genetics, but some of the most interesting questions involve non-model organisms that lack well annotated reference genomes. Many felid species exhibit polymorphism for melanism but the relative roles played by genetic drift, natural selection, and interspecies hybridization remain uncertain. We identify mutations of Agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or the Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) as independent causes...

Data from: Phylogenomic evidence for ancient hybridization in the genomes of living cats (Felidae)

Gang Li, Brian W. Davis, Eduardo Eizirik & William J. Murphy
Interspecies hybridization has been recently recognized as potentially common in wild animals, but the extent to which it shapes modern genomes is still poorly understood. Distinguishing historical hybridization events from other processes leading to phylogenetic discordance among different markers requires a well-resolved species tree that considers all modes of inheritance, and overcomes systematic problems due to rapid lineage diversification by sampling large genomic character sets. Here we assessed genome-wide phylogenetic variation across a diverse mammalian...

Data from: Population genetics of jaguars (Panthera onca) in the Brazilian Pantanal: molecular evidence for demographic connectivity on a regional scale

Fernanda Pedone Valdez, Taiana Haag, Fernando C. C. Azevedo, Leandro Silveira, Sandra M. C. Cavalcanti, Francisco M. Salzano & Eduardo Eizirik
Habitat loss and fragmentation are important threats to carnivores worldwide, and can be especially intense for large predators. Jaguars have already been extirpated from over half of their original area of distribution, and few regions still maintain large populations. For these, detailed understanding is crucial for setting appropriate recovery targets in impacted areas. The Pantanal is among the best examples of a region with a large jaguar population in a healthy environment. Here, we analyzed...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul
    3
  • Texas A&M University
    1
  • Saint Petersburg State University
    1
  • Federal University of São João del-Rei
    1
  • National Cancer Institute
    1
  • Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul
    1
  • University of Chile
    1
  • HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology
    1