5 Works

Data from: Feeding strategies of brown howler monkeys in response to variations in food availability

Óscar M. Chaves & Júlio César Bicca-Marques
Primates display varying degrees of behavioral flexibility that allow them to adjust their diet to temporal changes in food availability. This trait might be critical for the survival of folivorous-frugivorous species inhabiting small forest fragments, where the availability of food resources tends to be lower than in large fragments and continuous forests. However, the scarcity of studies addressing this issue hampers our understanding of the adaptive behaviors that favor the survival of these primates in...

Avifauna occurrence data from a longitudinal experiment in human-modified Amazonian forests affected by the 2015-16 El Niño drought and associated fires

A. Lees, N. Moura, F.M. Franca, J.N. Ferreira, T. Gardner, E. Berenguer, L. Chesini, C. Andertti & J. Barlow
This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem...

Data from: Origin and hidden diversity within the poorly known Galápagos snake radiation (Serpentes: Dipsadidae)

Hussam Zaher, Mario H. Yánez-Munõz, Miguel T. Rodrigues, Roberta Graboski, Fabio A. Machado, Marco Altamirano-Benavides, Sandro L. Bonatto & Felipe G. Grazziotin
Galápagos snakes are among the least studied terrestrial vertebrates of the Archipelago. Here, we provide a phylogenetic analysis and a time calibrated tree for the group, based on a sampling of the major populations known to occur in the Archipelago. Our study revealed the presence of two previously unknown species from Santiago and Rábida Islands, and one from Tortuga, Isabela, and Fernandina. We also recognize six additional species of Pseudalsophis in the Galápagos Archipelago (Pseudalsophis...

Data from: Habitat amount hypothesis and passive sampling explain mammal species composition in Amazonian river islands

Rafael M. Rabelo, Susan Aragón, Júlio César Bicca-Marques & Bruce W. Nelson.
Nested structures of species assemblages have been frequently associated with patch size and isolation, leading to the conclusion that colonization-extinction dynamics drives nestedness. The ‘passive sampling’ model states that the regional abundance of species randomly determines their occurrence in patches. The ‘habitat amount hypothesis’ also challenges patch size and isolation effects, arguing that they occur because of a 'sample area effect'. Here we (1) ask whether the structure of the mammal assemblages of fluvial islands...

Data from: Temporal changes in genetic variability in three bumblebee species from Rio Grande do Sul, South Brazil

Kevin Maebe, Laura Golsteyn, Patrícia Nunes-Silva, Betina Blochtein & Guy Smagghe
Microsatellite_GenAlEX_datafileThis datafile includes the microsatellite genetic data in GenALEx format used in the paperDryad_Apidologie.xlsx

Registration Year

  • 2018
    5

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    5

Affiliations

  • Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul
    4
  • Ghent University
    1
  • Central University of Ecuador
    1
  • University of Guelph
    1
  • Instituto Butantan
    1
  • National Institute of Amazonian Research
    1
  • Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul
    1
  • Manchester Metropolitan University
    1
  • Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad
    1
  • Universidad Iberoamericana del Ecuador
    1