104 Works

Global divergence and local convergence of utterance semantic representations in dialogue

Yang Xu

Data from: Phylogenomic reclassification of the world’s most venomous spiders (Mygalomorphae, Atracinae), with implications for venom evolution

Marshal Hedin, Shahan Derkarabetian, Martín J. Ramírez, Cor Vink & Jason E. Bond
Here we show that the most venomous spiders in the world are phylogenetically misplaced. Australian atracine spiders (family Hexathelidae), including the notorious Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus, produce venom peptides that can kill people. Intriguingly, eastern Australian mouse spiders (family Actinopodidae) are also medically dangerous, possessing venom peptides strikingly similar to Atrax hexatoxins. Based on the standing morphology-based classification, mouse spiders are hypothesized distant relatives of atracines, having diverged over 200 million years ago. Using...

Data from: Sequencing of seven haloarchaeal genomes reveals patterns of genomic flux

Erin A. Lynch, Morgan G. I. Langille, Aaron Darling, Elizabeth G. Wilbanks, Caitlin Haltiner, Katie S. Y. Shao, Michael O. Starr, Clotilde Teiling, Timothy T. Harkins, Robert A. Edwards, Jonathan A. Eisen, Marc T. Facciotti & Lennart Randau
We report the sequencing of seven genomes from two haloarchaeal genera, Haloferax and Haloarcula. Ease of cultivation and the existence of well-developed genetic and biochemical tools for several diverse haloarchaeal species make haloarchaea a model group for the study of archaeal biology. The unique physiological properties of these organisms also make them good candidates for novel enzyme discovery for biotechnological applications. Seven genomes were sequenced to ~20×coverage and assembled to an average of 50 contigs...

Data from: Black abalone (Haliotis cracherodii) population structure shifts through deep time: Management implications for southern California's northern Channel Islands

Hannah Haas, Todd J. Braje, Matthew S. Edwards, Jon M. Erlandson & Steven G. Whitaker
For over 10,000 years, black abalone (Haliotis cracherodii) were an important resource in southern California, first for coastal Native Americans, then beginning in the nineteenth century, as one of the state's first commercial shellfisheries. By 1993, after years of heavy fishing, rising sea surface temperatures (SST), and the spread of withering syndrome (WS), black abalone populations declined dramatically, resulting in the closure of the Alta California fishery. After nearly 25 years of management and recovery...

Data from: Sky island diversification meets the multispecies coalescent – divergence in the spruce-fir moss spider (Microhexura montivaga, Araneae, Mygalomorphae) on the highest peaks of southern Appalachia

Marshal Hedin, Dave Carlson & Fred Coyle
Microhexura montivaga is a miniature tarantula-like spider endemic to the highest peaks of the southern Appalachian mountains and is known only from six allopatric, highly disjunct montane populations. Because of severe declines in spruce-fir forest in the late 20th century, M. montivaga was formally listed as a US federally endangered species in 1995. Using DNA sequence data from one mitochondrial and seven nuclear genes, patterns of multigenic genetic divergence were assessed for six montane populations....

Sitticine jumping spiders: phylogeny, classification and chromosomes (Araneae: Salticidae: Sitticini)

Wayne Maddison, David Maddison, Shahan Derkarabetian & Marshal Hedin
We review the systematics of sitticine jumping spiders, with a focus on the Palearctic and Nearctic regions, in order to revise their generic classification, clarify the species of one region (Canada), and study their chromosomes. A genome-wide molecular phylogeny of 23 sitticine species, using more than 700 loci from the arachnid Ultra-Conserved Element (UCE) probeset, confirms the Neotropical origins of sitticines, whose basal divergence separates the new subtribe Aillutticina (a group of 5 Neotropical genera)...

Data from: Phosphorus alleviation of nitrogen-suppressed methane sink in global grasslands

Lihua Zhang, Fenghui Yuan, Junhong Bai, Hongtao Duan, Xueying Gu, Longyu Hou, Yao Huang, Mingan Yang, Jinsheng He, Zhenghua Zhang, Lijun Yu, Changchun Song, David Lipson, Donatella Zona, Walter Oechel, Ivan Janssens & Xiaofeng Xu
Grassland ecosystems account for more than 10% of the global CH4 sink in soils. A 4-year field experiment found that addition of P alone did not affect CH4 uptake and experimental addition of N alone significantly suppressed CH4 uptake, while concurrent N and P additions suppressed CH4 uptake to a lesser degree. A meta-analysis including 382 data points in global grasslands corroborated these findings. Global extrapolation with an empirical modeling approach estimated that contemporary N...

Soil dissolved organic carbon in terrestrial ecosystems: global budget, spatial distribution and controls

Xiaofeng Xu, Ziyu Guo, Yihui Wang & Zhongmei Wan
Aims: Soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a primary form of labile carbon in terrestrial ecosystems and therefore plays a vital role in soil carbon cycling. This study aims to quantify the budgets of soil DOC at biome- and global levels and to examine the variations in soil DOC and their environmental controls. Location: Global Time period: 1981 - 2019 Method: We compiled a global dataset and analyzed the concentration and distribution of DOC across...

Automated total and heterotrophic soil respiration in semi-arid shrubland and annual invasive patches

Marguerite Mauritz & David A Lipson
Soil respiration (Rs) is the largest terrestrial source of carbon (C) flux to the atmosphere but our understanding of Rs controls with shifts in plant-community composition remains limited. We used high frequency soil respiration measurements and root exclusion to evaluate how Rs component fluxes, autotrophic respiration (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh), vary between a perennial semi-arid shrub community and annual invasive community.

Bill size, bill shape, and body size constrain bird song evolution on a macroevolutionary scale

Amelia-Juliette Demery, Kevin Burns & Nicholas Mason
Studying macroevolutionary patterns of phenotypic variation and their driving forces in large radiations can shed light on how biodiversity is generated across broad spatiotemporal scales. In this study, we integrated song and morphological variation across more than 300 species representing the largest family of songbirds, the tanagers (Thraupidae), to uncover how morphological variables of the vocal tract combine to shape vocal evolution on a macroevolutionary scale. We found that body size correlated with multiple frequency...

Evolutionary divergences mirror Pleistocene paleodrainages in a rapidly-evolving complex of oasis-dwelling jumping spiders (Salticidae, Habronattus tarsalis)

Marshal Hedin, Steven Foldi & Brendan Rajah-Boyer
We aimed to understand the diversification history of jumping spiders in the Habronattus tarsalis species complex, with particular emphasis on how history in this system might illuminate biogeographic patterns and processes in deserts of the western United States. Desert populations of H. tarsalis are now confined to highly discontinuous oasis-like habitats, but these habitats would have been periodically more connected during multiple pluvial periods of the Pleistocene. We estimated divergence times using relaxed molecular clock...

Data from: European ornamental garden flora as an invasion debt under climate change

Emily Haeuser, Wayne Dawson, Wilfried Thuiller, Stefan Dullinger, Svenja Block, Oliver Bossdorf, Marta Carboni, Luisa Conti, Iwona Dullinger, Franz Essl, Günther Klonner, Dietmar Moser, Tamara Muenkemueller, Madalin Parepa, Matthew V. Talluto, Holger Kreft, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Patrick Weigelt, Marten Winter, Martin Hermy, Sebastiaan Van Der Veken, Cristina Roquet & Mark Van Kleunen
1.Most naturalized and invasive alien plant species were originally introduced to regions for horticultural purposes. However, many regions now face an invasion debt from ornamental alien species, which have not yet naturalized. In this regard, climate change represents a threat as it may lower the barriers to naturalization for some ornamental alien species. Identifying those species is extremely important for anticipating impending invasions. 2.To identify predictors of naturalization, we modelled the effects of climate, nursery...

Data from: High phylogenetic utility of an ultraconserved element probe set designed for Arachnida

James Starrett, Shahan Derkarabetian, Marshal Hedin, , John E. McCormack, Brant C. Faircloth & Robert W. Bryson
Arachnida is an ancient, diverse, and ecologically important animal group that contains a number of species of interest for medical, agricultural, and engineering applications. Despite their importance, many aspects of the arachnid tree of life remain unresolved, hindering comparative approaches to arachnid biology. Biologists have made considerable efforts to resolve the arachnid phylogeny; yet, limited and challenging morphological characters, as well as a dearth of genetic resources, have hindered progress. Here, we present a genomic...

Dataset for: Conservation genomics of federally endangered Texella harvester species (Arachnida, Opiliones, Phalangodidae) from cave and karst habitats of central Texas

Marshal Hedin, Shahan Derkarabetian, James Reddell & Pierre Paquin
Genomic-scale data for non-model taxa are providing new insights into landscape genomic structuring and species limits, leading to more informed conservation decisions, particularly in taxa with extremely restricted microhabitat preferences and small geographic distributions. This study applied sequence capture of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) to gather genomic-scale data for two federally endangered Texella harvester species distributed in Edwards Formation cave and karst habitats of central Texas, near Austin. We gathered UCE data for 51 T. reyesi...

Project Report NOAA Ship Hi‘ialakai, Project HA-15-01, Leg 1

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PIFSC project report ; Project HA-15-01

Data from: eDNA metabarcoding bioassessment of endangered fairy shrimp (Branchinecta spp.) - Part B

Zachary Gold, Adam R. Wall, Emily E. Curd, Ryan P. Kelly, N. Dean Pentcheff, Lee Ripma, Paul H. Barber & Regina Wetzer
Fairy shrimp are integral components of vernal pool ecosystems, providing key food resources for migratory birds and amphibians. However, habitat degradation and land use change severely threaten the health of both vernal pools and the survival of fairy shrimp species. Branchinecta sandiegonensis Fugate, 1993 has been particularly affected by urban and agricultural development in its small native range within San Diego County, California, USA. It is listed as an endangered species under federal laws and...

Data from: Organic carbon, grain size, elemental/isotopic composition

Melissa Ward
Salt marshes and seagrass meadows can sequester and store high quantities of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments relative to other marine and terrestrial habitats. Assessing carbon stocks, carbon sources, and the transfer of carbon between habitats within coastal seascapes are each integral in identifying the role of blue carbon habitats in coastal carbon cycling. Here, we quantified carbon stocks, sources, and exchanges in seagrass meadows, salt marshes, and unvegetated sediments in six bays along...

Across borders: external factors and prior behavior influence North Pacific albatross associations with fishing vessels

Rachael Orben, Josh Adams, Michelle Hester, Scott Shaffer, Robert Suryan, Tomohiro Deguchi, Kiyoaki Ozaki, Fumio Sato, Lindsay Young, Corey Clatterbuck, Melinda Conners, David Kroodsma & Leigh Torres
1. Understanding encounters between marine predators and fisheries across national borders and outside national jurisdictions offers new perspectives on unwanted interactions to inform ocean management and predator conservation. Although seabird-fisheries overlap has been documented at many scales, remote identification of vessel encounters has lagged because vessel movement data often is lacking. 2. Here, we reveal albatross-fisheries associations throughout the North Pacific Ocean. We identified commercial fishing operations using Global Fishing Watch data and algorithms to...

Evolutionary impacts of introgressive hybridization in a rapidly evolving group of jumping spiders (F. Salticidae, Habronattus americanus group)

Tierney Bougie, Alan Brelsford & Marshal Hedin
Introgressive hybridization can be a powerful force impacting patterns of evolution at multiple taxonomic levels. We aimed to understand how introgression has affected speciation and diversification within a species complex of jumping spiders. The Habronattus americanus subgroup is a recently radiating group of jumping spiders, with species now in contact after hypothesized periods of isolation during glaciation cycles of the Pleistocene. Effects of introgression on genomes and morphology were investigated using phylogenomic and clustering methods...

Data from: Management actions shape dung beetle community structure and functional traits in restored tallgrass prairie

Nicholas A. Barber, Sheryl C. Hosler, Holly P. Jones & Melissa Nelson
1. Ecosystem restoration often focuses on reestablishing species richness and diversity of native organisms, especially plants. However, effective restoration requires re-establishment of ecosystem functions and processes by all trophic levels. Functional trait descriptions of communities, including decomposer communities, may provide more comprehensive evaluations of restoration activities and management than taxonomic community metrics alone. 2. We examined species and functional trait composition of dung beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Geotrupidae) communities across a 3-31 year chronosequence of restored...

A global map of microbial residence time

Liyuan He & Xiaofeng Xu
Soil microbes are the fundamental engine for carbon (C) cycling. Microbial residence time (MRT) therefore determines the mineralization of soil organic C, releasing C as heterotrophic respiration and contributing substantially to the C efflux in terrestrial ecosystems. We took use of a comprehensive dataset (2627 data points) and calculated the MRT based on the basal respiration and microbial biomass C. Large variations in MRT were found among biomes, with the largest MRT in boreal forests...

Data from: Comparative analyses of reproductive structures in harvestmen (Opiliones) reveal multiple transitions from courtship to precopulatory antagonism

Mercedes M. Burns, Marshal Hedin & Jeffrey W. Shultz
Explaining the rapid, species-specific diversification of reproductive structures and behaviors is a long-standing goal of evolutionary biology, with recent research tending to attribute reproductive phenotypes to the evolutionary mechanisms of female mate choice or intersexual conflict. Progress in understanding these and other possible mechanisms depends, in part, on reconstructing the direction, frequency and relative timing of phenotypic evolution of male and female structures in species-rich clades. Here we examine evolution of reproductive structures in the...

Data from: When do species-tree and concatenated estimates disagree? An empirical analysis with higher-level scincid lizard phylogeny

Shea M. Lambert, Tod W. Reeder & John J. Wiens
Simulation studies suggest that coalescent-based species-tree methods are generally more accurate than concatenated analyses. However, these species-tree methods remain impractical for many large datasets. Thus, a critical but unresolved issue is when and why concatenated and coalescent species-tree estimates will differ. We predict such differences for branches in concatenated trees that are short, weakly supported, and have conflicting gene trees. We test these predictions in Scincidae, the largest lizard family, with data from 10 nuclear...

Data from: Comparative transcriptomics of Entelegyne spiders (Araneae, Entelegynae), with emphasis on molecular evolution of orphan genes

David E. Carlson & Marshal Hedin
Next-generation sequencing technology is rapidly transforming the landscape of evolutionary biology, and has become a cost-effective and efficient means of collecting exome information for non-model organisms. Due to their taxonomic diversity, production of interesting venom and silk proteins, and the relative scarcity of existing genomic resources, spiders in particular are excellent targets for next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods. In this study, the transcriptomes of six entelegyne spider species from three genera (Cicurina travisae, C. vibora, Habronattus...

Data from: Sequencing of seven haloarchaeal genomes reveals patterns of genomic flux

Erin A. Lynch, Morgan G. I. Langille, Aaron Darling, Elizabeth G. Wilbanks, Caitlin Haltiner, Katie S. Y. Shao, Michael O. Starr, Clotilde Teiling, Timothy T. Harkins, Robert A. Edwards, Jonathan A. Eisen & Marc T. Facciotti
We report the sequencing of seven genomes from two haloarchaeal genera, Haloferax and Haloarcula. Ease of cultivation and the existence of well-developed genetic and biochemical tools for several diverse haloarchaeal species make haloarchaea a model group for the study of archaeal biology. The unique physiological properties of these organisms also make them good candidates for novel enzyme discovery for biotechnological applications. Seven genomes were sequenced to ~20×coverage and assembled to an average of 50 contigs...

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