109 Works

Urbanization reduces genetic connectivity in bobcats (Lynx rufus) at both intra- and inter-population spatial scales

Christopher P Kozakiewicz, Christopher Burridge, W. Chris Funk, Patricia E Salerno, Daryl R Trumbo, Roderick B Gagne, Erin E Boydston, Robert N Fisher, Lisa M Lyren, Megan K Jennings, Seth P D Riley, Laurel E K Serieys, Sue VandeWoude, Kevin R Crooks & Scott Carver
Urbanization is a major factor driving habitat fragmentation and connectivity loss in wildlife. However, the impacts of urbanization on connectivity can vary among species and even populations due to differences in local landscape characteristics, and our ability to detect these relationships may depend on the spatial scale at which they are measured. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) are relatively sensitive to urbanization and the status of bobcat populations is an important indicator of connectivity in urban coastal...

The intensity of sexual selection, body size and reproductive success in a mating system with male-male combat: Is bigger better?

Xavier Glaudas, Stephen Rice, Rulon Clark & Graham Alexander
Body size is a key selected trait in many animal systems: larger size is sexually selected for in males because it confers a reproductive advantage during contest competition for access to females, and larger females are naturally selected for fecundity. Herein, we used radio-telemetry to gather a large dataset of male-female interactions and DNA paternity analyses to characterize the intensity of sexual selection and the link between two body size metrics (body length and condition,...

Data from: Ground squirrel tail-flag displays alter both predatory strike and ambush site selection behaviours of rattlesnakes

Matthew A. Barbour & Rulon W. Clark
Many species approach, inspect, and signal toward their predators. These behaviours are often interpreted as predator-deterrent signals—honest signals that indicate to predators that continued hunting is likely to be futile. However, many of these putative predator-deterrent signals are given when no predator is present, and it remains unclear if and why such signals deter predators. We examined the effects of one such signal, the tail-flag display of California ground squirrels, which is frequently given both...

Data from: A reconsideration of the classification of the spider infraorder Mygalomorphae based on three nuclear genes and morphology (Arachnida: Araneae)

Jason E. Bond, Brent E. Hendrixson, Chris A. Hamilton & Marshal Hedin
BACKGROUND: The infraorder Mygalomorphae (i.e., trapdoor spiders, tarantulas, funnel web spiders, etc.) is one of three main lineages of spiders. Comprising 15 families, 325 genera, and over 2,600 species, the group is a diverse assemblage that has retained a number of features considered primitive for spiders. Despite an evolutionary history dating back to the lower Triassic, the group has received comparatively little attention with respect to its phylogeny and higher classification. The few phylogenies published...

Data from: Elaborate visual and acoustic signals evolve independently in a large, phenotypically diverse radiation of songbirds

Nicholas A. Mason, Allison J. Shultz & Kevin J. Burns
The concept of a macroevolutionary trade-off among sexual signals has a storied history in evolutionary biology. Theory predicts that if multiple sexual signals are costly for males to produce or maintain and females prefer a single, sexually selected trait, then an inverse correlation between sexual signal elaborations is expected among species. However, empirical evidence for what has been termed the ‘transfer hypothesis’ is mixed, which may reflect different selective pressures among lineages, evolutionary covariates or...

Data from: Interactive effects of predator and prey harvest on ecological resilience of rocky reefs

Robert P. Dunn, Marissa L. Baskett & Kevin A. Hovel
A major goal of ecosystem-based fisheries management is to prevent fishery-induced shifts in community states. This requires an understanding of ecological resilience: the ability of an ecosystem to return to the same state following a perturbation, which can strongly depend on species interactions across trophic levels. We use a structured model of a temperate rocky reef to explore how multi-trophic level fisheries impact ecological resilience. Increasing fishing mortality of prey (urchins) has a minor effect...

Data from: The role of hybridization during ecological divergence of southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis) and limber pine (P. flexilis)

Mitra Menon, Justin C. Bagley, Christopher J. Friedline, Amy V. Whipple, Anna W. Schoettle, Alejandro Lael-Saenz, Christian Wehenkel, Francisco Molina-Freaner, Lluvia Flores-Renteria, M. Socorro Gonzalez-Elizondo, Richard A. Sniezko, Samuel A. Cushman, Kristen M. Waring & Andrew J. Eckert
Interactions between extrinsic factors, such as disruptive selection, and intrinsic factors, such as genetic incompatibilities among loci, often contribute towards the maintenance of species boundaries. The relative roles of these factors in the establishment of reproductive isolation can be examined using species pairs characterized by gene flow throughout their divergence history. We investigated the process of speciation and the maintenance of species boundaries between Pinus strobiformis and P. flexilis. Utilizing ecological niche modeling, demographic modeling,...

Data from: Biogeographical evidence for common vicariance and rare dispersal in a southern Appalachian harvestman (Sabaconidae, Sabacon cavicolens)

Marshal Hedin & Maureen McCormack
Aim: Species or higher taxa that are obviously dispersal-limited, but which occupy large geographical distributions, represent a biogeographical paradox. Dispersal must have happened, likely under special and infrequent environmental conditions, but details have been lost to history. The overarching goal of our research is to understand the details of a ‘common vicariance, rare dispersal’ biogeographical history in a widespread but habitat-specialized harvestman species (Sabacon cavicolens) with a southern Appalachian centre of distribution. Location: Eastern North...

Data from: Form–function relationships in a marine foundation species depend on scale: a shoot to global perspective from a distributed ecological experiment

Jennifer L. Ruesink, John J. Stachowicz, Pamela L. Reynolds, Christoffer Boström, Mathieu Cusson, James Douglass, Johan Eklöf, Aschwin H. Engelen, Masakazu Hori, Kevin Hovel, Katrin Iken, Per-Olav Moksnes, Masahiro Nakaoka, Mary I. O'Connor, Jeanine L. Olsen, Erik E. Sotka, Matthew A. Whalen & Emmett J. Duffy
Form-function relationships in plants underlie their ecosystem roles in supporting higher trophic levels through primary production, detrital pathways, and habitat provision. For widespread, phenotypically-variable plants, productivity may differ not only across abiotic conditions, but also from distinct morphological or demographic traits. A single foundation species, eelgrass (Zostera marina), typically dominates north temperate seagrass meadows, which we studied across 14 sites spanning 32-61° N latitude and two ocean basins. Body size varied by nearly two orders...

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