10 Works

Selection of indicators for assessing and managing the impacts of bottom trawling on seabed habitats

Jan Geert Hiddink, Michel Kaiser, Marija Sciberras, Robert McConnaughey, Tessa Mazor, Ray Hilborn, Jeremy Collie, C. Roland Pitcher, Ana Parma, Petri Suuronen, Adriaan Rijnsdorp & Simon Jennings
1. Bottom-trawl fisheries are the most-widespread source of anthropogenic physical disturbance to seabed habitats. Development of fisheries-, conservation- and ecosystem-based management strategies requires the selection of indicators of the impact of bottom trawling on the state of benthic biota. Many indicators have been proposed, but no rigorous test of a range of candidate indicators against 9 commonly-agreed criteria (concreteness, theoretical basis, public awareness, cost, measurement, historical data, sensitivity, responsiveness, specificity) has been performed. 2. Here,...

Supplementary Table 11: Regional zOTU table (data as relative abundances)

Charlie Melissa Phelps, Kathryn McMahon, Andrew Bissett, Rachele Bernasconi, Peter Steinberg, Torsten Thomas, Ezequiel Marzinelli & Megan Huggett
This research focuses on the spatial and temporal variations in the whole and core microbial communities on the ecologically important, temperate kelp E. radiata. Including the relationship with environmental drivers and the whole microbial community. Our research sampled microbial communities over a 17-month period, from six different sites in two distinct geographic regions (East and West coasts of Australia). This zOTU table is the relative abundances for the whole regional (combined WA and NSW) dataset.

Large-scale interventions may delay decline of the Great Barrier Reef

Scott Condie, Ken Anthony, Mark Baird, Roger Beeden, Daniel Harrison, Éva Plagányi, Russell Babcock, Cameron Fletcher, Rebecca Gorton, Alistair Hobday & David Westcott
On the iconic Great Barrier Reef (GBR) the cumulative impacts of tropical cyclones, marine heatwaves and regular outbreaks of coral-eating crown-of-thorns starfish (CoTS) have severely depleted coral cover. Climate change will further exacerbate this situation over the coming decades unless effective interventions are implemented. Evaluating the efficacy of alternative interventions in a complex system experiencing major cumulative impacts can only be achieved through a systems-modeling approach. We have evaluated combinations of interventions using a coral...

Data from: A unified framework for quantifying land carbon sequestration

Yiqi Luo, Yuanyuan Huang, Carlos Sierra & Jianyang Xia
Land ecosystems offer an effective nature-based solution to climate change mitigation by absorbing approximately 30% of anthropically emitted carbon. This absorption is primarily based on constraints from atmospheric and oceanic measurements while quantification from direct studies of the land carbon cycle itself displays great uncertainty. The latter hinders prediction of the future fate of the land carbon sink. Here, we show a unified framework for quantifying land carbon sequestration. The framework unifies all carbon cycle...

Data from: Priorities and motivations of marine coastal restoration research

Elisa Bayraktarov, Shantala Brisbane, Phoebe J Stewart-Sinclair, Audrey Van Herwaarden, Keila Stark, Valerie Hagger, Carter S Smith, Kerrie A Wilson, Catherine E Lovelock, Chris Gillies, Andrew D L Steven & Megan I Saunders
Active restoration is becoming an increasingly important conservation intervention to counteract the degradation of marine coastal ecosystems. Understanding what has motivated the scientific community to research the restoration of marine coastal ecosystems and how restoration research projects are funded is essential if we want to scale-up restoration interventions to meaningful extents.Here, we systematically review and synthesize data to understand the motivations for research on the restoration of coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, saltmarsh, and oyster reefs....

Gross primary production responses to warming, elevated CO2 , and irrigation: quantifying the drivers of ecosystem physiology in a semiarid grassland

Elise Pendall, Edmund M. Ryan, Kiona Ogle, Drew Peltier, David G. Williams, Anthony P. Walker, Martin G. De Kauwe, Belinda E. Medlyn, William Parton, Shinichi Asao, Bertrand Guenet, Anna B. Harper, Xingjie Lu, Kristina A. Luus, Sönke Zaehle, Shijie Shu, Christian Werner & Jianyang Xia
Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will be a source or sink of carbon (C) under a future climate of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming requires accurate quantification of gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux of C in the global C cycle. We evaluated 6 years (2007–2012) of flux‐derived GPP data from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, situated in a grassland in Wyoming, USA. The GPP data were used to calibrate a...

Data from: Niche partitioning between river shark species is driven by seasonal fluctuations in environmental salinity

Ross Dwyer, Hamish Campbell, Rebecca Cramp, Colin Burke, Mariana Micheli-Campbell, Richard Pillans, Barry Lyon & Craig Franklin
Tropical rivers and estuaries are highly dynamic environments, where environmental conditions change dramatically over spatial and temporal scales. This creates both physiological and ecological challenges for euryhaline elasmobranchs, where fluctuations in salinity can impact not only osmoregulatory function, but also the ability to find and acquire prey. We investigated how spatial and temporal variation in environmental salinity influences physiological homeostasis, habitat utilisation, and migration timing in two euryhaline carcharhinid sharks within a tropical river in...

Data from: Mobulid rays feed on euphausiids in the Bohol Sea

Christoph A. Rohner, Katherine B. Burgess, Joshua M. Rambahiniarison, Joshua D. Stewart, Alessandro Ponzo & Anthony J. Richardson
Mobulid rays have a conservative life history and are caught in direct fisheries and as by-catch. Their subsequent vulnerability to overexploitation has recently been recognized, but fisheries management can be ineffective if it ignores habitat and prey preferences and other trophic interactions of the target species. Here, we assessed the feeding ecology of four mobulids (Manta birostris, Mobula tarapacana, M. japanica, M. thurstoni) in the Bohol Sea, Philippines, using stomach contents analysis of fisheries specimens...

Data from: Sex-specific effects of fisheries and climate on the demography of sexually dimorphic seabirds

Dimas Gianuca, Stephen C. Votier, Deborah Pardo, Andrew G. Wood, Richard B. Sherley, Louise Ireland, Remi Choquet, Roger Pradel, Stuart Townley, Jaume Forcada, Geoffrey N. Tuck & Richard A. Phillips
1. Many animal taxa exhibit sex-specific variation in ecological traits, such as foraging and distribution. These differences could result in sex-specific responses to change, but such demographic effects are poorly understood. 2. Here we test for sex-specific differences in the demography of northern (NGP, Macronectes halli) and southern (SGP, M. giganteus) giant petrels - strongly sexually size-dimorphic birds that breed sympatrically at South Georgia, South Atlantic Ocean. Both species feed at sea or on carrion...

Data from: Combined mechanistic modelling predicts changes in species distribution and increased co-occurrence of a tropical urchin herbivore and a habitat-forming temperate kelp

Louise Castro, Paulina Cetina-Heredia, Moninya Roughan, Symon Dworjanyn, Loic Thibaut, Matthew Chamberlain, Ming Feng & Adriana Vergés
This dataset aims to identify climate change impacts on spawning and settlement of a tropical herbivore, the sea-urchin, Tripneustes gratilla, along eastern Australia and into the Tasman Sea including Lord Howe Island. The dataset contains the trajectories of particles that represent T. gratilla larvae and their dispersal by ocean currents for each day of both a contemporary (2006-2015) and future ‘business as usual’ RCP 8.5 climate change scenario (2090-2100). T. gratilla larval dispersal under both...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    2
  • 2020
    6
  • 2019
    1
  • 2017
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • CSIRO Ocean and Atmosphere
    10
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • Southern Cross University
    2
  • Northern Arizona University
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry
    2
  • Bangor University
    1
  • Marine Megafauna Foundation
    1
  • University of Washington
    1