85 Works

Data from: Do environmental conditions experienced in early life affect recruitment age and performance at first breeding in common goldeneye females?

Hannu Pöysä, Robert G. Clark, Antti Paasivaara & Pentti Runko
Environmental conditions experienced early in life may have long-term impacts on life history traits and reproductive performance. We investigated whether ambient temperature experienced during the first two to four weeks of life and weather severity during the first two winters affected recruitment age and relative timing of breeding in the year of recruitment in female common goldeneyes (Bucephala clangula). Our sample consisted of 141 female recruits hatched in a study population in central Finland between...

Data from: Limited consequences of infestation with a blood-feeding ectoparasite for the nestlings of two North Pacific seabirds

J. Mark Hipfner, Douglas F. Bertram & Mark C. Drever
The seabird tick (Ixodes uriae) parasitizes over 60 host species in the circumpolar regions of both hemispheres, and acts as a vector for a number of potentially virulent pathogens. On Triangle Island, British Columbia, Canada, the nestlings of Cassin’s Auklet (Ptychoramphus aleuticus) and Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata) are often parasitized by seabird ticks, which may affect their growth and survival in the nest. We used a logistic growth model to interpolate between successive measures of...

Catchment properties and the photosynthetic trait composition of freshwater plant communities

Lars Lønsmann Iversen, A. Winkel, L. Baastrup-Spohr, A. B. Hinke, J. Alahuhta, A. Baattrup-Pedersen, S. Birk, P. Brodersen, P. A. Chambers, F. Ecke, T. Feldmann, D. Gebler, J. Heino, T. S. Jespersen, S. J. Moe, T. Riis, L. Sass, O. Vestergaard, S. C. Maberly, K. Sand-Jensen & O. Pedersen
Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO2 in water. Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concentrations and the frequency of freshwater plants possessing the bicarbonate use trait. We show, globally, that the frequency of plant species with...

Merging indigenous and scientific knowledge links climate with the growth of a large migratory caribou population

Catherine A. Gagnon, Sandra Hamel, Don E. Russell, Todd Powell, James Andre, Michael Y. Svoboda & Dominique Berteaux
1. Climate change in the Arctic is two to three times faster than anywhere else in the world. It is therefore crucial to understand the effects of weather on keystone arctic species, particularly those such as caribou (Rangifer tarandus) that sustain northern communities. Bridging long-term scientific and indigenous knowledge offers a promising path to achieve this goal, as both types of knowledge may complement one another. 2. We assessed the influence of environmental variables on...

Data from: The chemical basis of a signal of individual identity: Shell pigment concentrations track the unique appearance of Common Murre eggs

Mark E Hauber, Alexander L Bond, Amy-Lee Kouwenberg, Gregory J Robertson, Erpur S Hansen, Mande Holford, Miri Dainson, Alec Luro & James Dale
In group-living species with parental care, the accurate recognition of one’s own young is critical to fitness. Because discriminating offspring within a large colonial group may be challenging, progeny of colonial breeders often display familial or individual identity signals to elicit and receive costly parental provisions from their own parents. For instance, the Common Murre (or Common Guillemot: Uria aalge) is a colonially breeding seabird that does not build a nest and lays and incubates...

Data from: A range-wide domino effect and resetting of the annual cycle in a migratory songbird

Elizabeth A. Gow, Lauren Burke, David W. Winkler, Samantha M. Knight, Robert G. Clark, Marc Bélisle, Lisha L. Berzins, Tricia Blake, Eli S. Bridge, Russell D. Dawson, Peter O. Dunn, Dany Garant, Geoff Holroyd, Andrew G. Horn, David J.T. Hussell, Olga Lansdorp, Andrew J. Laughlin, Marty L. Leonard, Fanie Pelletier, Dave Shutler, Lynn Siefferman, Caz M. Taylor, Helen Trefry, Carol M. Vleck, David Vleck … & D. Ryan Norris
Latitudinal differences in timing of breeding are well documented but how such differences carry over to influence timing of events in the annual cycle of migratory birds is not well understood. We examined geographic variation in timing of events throughout the year using light-level geolocator tracking data from 133 migratory tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) originating from 12 North American breeding populations. A swallow’s breeding latitude influenced timing of breeding, which then carried over to affect...

Evening locomotor activity during stopover differs on pre-departure and departure days in free-living songbirds

Yolanda Morbey, Andrew Beauchamp, Simon Bonner & Gregory Mitchell
The length of time songbirds remain at a migratory stopover site is likely regulated by a daily stay/go decision informed by fat stores and weather conditions, but the finer-scale timing of this decision and associated pre-departure behaviours are still poorly understood. Using automated radiotelemetry of free-living songbirds captured at a migratory stopover site in spring, we tested whether individuals change their locomotor activity near sunset on their migratory departure day compared to their non-departure days....

rhinoceros auklet microsatellite data

Theresa Burg, Marie Prill, Katharine Studholme, Alice Domalik, Strahan Tucker, Catherine Jardine, Mark Maftei, Kenneth Wright, Jesse Beck, Russell Bradley, Ryan Carle, Thomas Good, Scott Hatch, Peter Hodum, Motohiro Ito, Scott Pearson, Nora Rojek, Leslie Slater, Yutaka Watanuki, Alexis Will, Aidan Bindoff, Glenn Crossin, Mark Drever & Mark Hipfner
We tested the hypothesis that segregation in wintering areas promotes population differentiation in a sentinel North Pacific seabird, the rhinoceros auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata). We collected tissue samples for genetic analyses on five breeding colonies in the western Pacific Ocean (Japan) and 13 in the eastern Pacific Ocean (California to Alaska), and deployed light-level geologgers on 12 eastern Pacific colonies to delineate wintering areas. Loggers were deployed previously on one colony in Japan. There was strong...

Prey selection of polar bears in Foxe Basin, Nunavut, Canada: evidence of dietary flexibility in a specialized predator

Melissa P. Galicia, Gregory W. Thiemann, Markus G. Dyck, Steven H. Ferguson & Ian Stirling
Ecological flexibility of a species reflects its ability to cope with environmental change. Although polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are experiencing changes in foraging opportunities due to sea ice loss, regional prey availability and environmental conditions will influence the rate and severity of these effects. We examined changes in polar bear diet and the influence of sea ice characteristics in Foxe Basin over an 18-year period. We combined previous fatty acid data from bears harvested from...

Maps of reporting facilities – criteria air contaminants

Costa Paulo &
The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is Canada's public inventory of pollutant releases (to air, water and land), disposals and transfers for recycling. The files below contain a map of Canada showing the locations of all facilities that reported direct releases of Criteria Air Contaminants to the NPRI. The data are for the most recent reporting year, by reported total quantities of these releases. The map is available in both ESRI REST (to use with...

Variation and correlation in the timing of breeding of North Atlantic seabirds across multiple scales

Katharine Keogan, Francis Daunt, Sarah Wanless, Richard Phillips, David Alvarez, Tycho Anker-Nilssen, Robert Barrett, Claus Bech, Peter Becker, Per-Arvid Berglund, Sandra Bouwhuis, Zofia Burr, Olivier Chastel, Signe Christensen-Dalsgaard, Sébastien Descamps, Tony Diamond, Kyle Elliott, Kjell Einar Erikstad, Mike Harris, Jonas Hentati-Sundberg, Martin Heubeck, Magdalene Langset, Svein Lorentsen, Heather Major, Mark Mallory … & Stephen Kress
Timing of breeding, an important driver of fitness in many populations, is widely studied in the context of global change, yet despite considerable efforts to identify environmental drivers of seabird nesting phenology, for most populations we lack evidence of strong drivers. Here we adopt an alternative approach, examining the degree to which different populations positively covary in their annual phenology to infer whether phenological responses to environmental drivers are likely to be (i) shared across...

Climate oscillations drive millennial-scale changes in seabird colony size

Matthew Duda, Frédéric Cyr, Gregory Robertson, Neal Michelutti, Carsten Meyer-Jacob, April Hedd, William Montevecchi, Linda Kimpe, Jules Blais & John Smol
Seabird population size is intimately linked to the physical, chemical, and biological processes of the oceans. Yet, the overall effects of long-term changes in ocean dynamics on seabird colonies are difficult to quantify. Here, we used dated lake sediments to reconstruct ~10,000-years of seabird dynamics in the Northwest Atlantic to determine the influences of Holocene-scale climatic oscillations on colony size. On Baccalieu Island (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) – where the world’s largest colony of Leach’s...

Warming in the land of the midnight sun: breeding birds may suffer greater heat stress at high- vs low-Arctic sites

Ryan O'Connor, Audrey Le Pogam, Kevin Young, Oliver Love, Christopher Cox, Gabrielle Roy, Francis Robitaille, Kyle Elliott, Anna Hargreaves, Emily Choy, Grant Gilchrist, Dominique Berteaux, Andrew Tam & François Vézina
Rising global temperatures are expected to increase reproductive costs for wildlife as greater thermoregulatory demands interfere with reproductive activities. However, predicting the temperatures at which reproductive performance is negatively impacted remains a significant hurdle. Using a thermoregulatory polygon approach, we derived a reproductive threshold temperature for an Arctic songbird–the snow bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis). We defined this threshold as the temperature at which individuals must reduce activity to suboptimal levels (i.e., < 4-times basal metabolic rate)...

Foraging on anthropogenic food predicts problem-solving skills in a seabird

Jessika Lamarre, Sukhinder Kaur Cheema, Gregory J. Robertson & David R. Wilson
Species and populations with greater cognitive performance are more successful at adapting to changing habitats. Accordingly, urban species and populations often outperform their rural counterparts on problem-solving tests. Paradoxically, urban foraging also might be detrimental to the development and integrity of animals’ brains because anthropogenic foods often lack essential nutrients such as the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which are important for cognitive performance in mammals and possibly birds....

Grassland bird population declines at three Breeding Bird Survey spatial scales in contrast to a large native prairie

Nancy Mahony, Brenda Dale & David Miller
Grassland biomes in North America are threatened by agricultural intensification with implications for grassland associated bird populations via habitat loss, alteration, pesticide use and declining landscape heterogeneity. Despite decades of conservation concern, steep declines of North American grassland bird populations continue. Key to optimizing conservation effort is understanding how land-use practices, such as agriculture, across the annual cycle affects population status. Determining the relative influence of impacts on grassland bird declines is difficult given that...

Additional file 1 of Behavioural flexibility in an Arctic seabird using two distinct marine habitats to survive the energetic constraints of winter

Allison Patterson, H. Grant Gilchrist, Gregory J. Robertson, April Hedd, David A. Fifield & Kyle H. Elliott
Additional file 1. Supplementary tables and figures.

Additional file 1 of Drivers of polar bear behavior and the possible effects of prey availability on foraging strategy

Ron R. Togunov, Andrew E. Derocher, Nicholas J. Lunn & Marie Auger-Méthé
Additional file 1. Contains supplementary figures, tables, methods, and results. The file contains hypotheses and predictions associated with each covariate used in modelling (Table A1), description of all data sources used in analysis (Table A2), methods and results for t correction and tidal integration (Section B), methods and results for satellite-ice-drift-based sea ice drift correction (Section C), methods and results of HMM without drift correction (Section D.1), HMM using wind and tidal integration (Section D.2),...

Data from: Impacts of nest predators and weather on reproductive success and population limitation in a long-distance migratory songbird

Thomas W. Sherry, Scott Wilson, Sarah Hunter & Richard T. Holmes
Although avian nesting success is much studied, little is known about the relative importance of the factors that contribute to annual reproductive success and population limitation, especially for long-distance migratory songbird species. We combined a field experiment limiting access to nests by mammalian predators with modeling of long-term field data of American redstarts (Parulidae: Setophaga ruticilla) to assess the effects of multiple environmental variables on breeding success and population limitation. Experimental treatment (baffles placed around...

Data from: Assessing costs of carrying geolocators using feather corticosterone in two species of aerial insectivore

Graham D. Fairhurst, Lisha L. Berzins, David W. Bradley, Andrew J. Laughlin, Andrea Romano, Maria Romano, Chiara Scandolara, Roberto Ambrosini, Russell D. Dawson, Peter O. Dunn, Keith A. Hobson, Felix Liechti, Tracy A. Marchant, D. Ryan Norris, Diego Rubolini, Nicola Saino, Caz M. Taylor, Linda A. Whittingham & Robert G. Clark
Despite benefits of using light-sensitive geolocators to track animal movements and describe patterns of migratory connectivity, concerns have been raised about negative effects of these devices, particularly in small species of aerial insectivore. Geolocators may act as handicaps that increase energetic expenditure, which could explain reported effects of geolocators on survival. We tested this ‘Energetic Expenditure Hypothesis’ in 12 populations of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from North America and Europe,...

Data from: Feather corticosterone reveals effect of moulting conditions in the autumn on subsequent reproductive output and survival in an Arctic migratory bird

N. Jane Harms, Pierre Legagneux, H. Grant Gilchrist, Joël Bêty, Oliver P. Love, Mark R. Forbes, Gary R. Bortolotti & Catherine Soos
For birds, unpredictable environments during the energetically stressful times of moulting and breeding are expected to have negative fitness effects. Detecting those effects however, might be difficult if individuals modulate their physiology and/or behaviours in ways to minimize short-term fitness costs. Corticosterone in feathers (CORTf) is thought to provide information on total baseline and stress-induced CORT levels at moulting and is an integrated measure of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal activity during the time feathers are grown. We predicted...

Data from: Recent Warming, Rather than Industrial Emissions of Bioavailable Nutrients, is the Dominant Driver of Lake Primary Production Shifts across the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

Jamie C. Summers, Joshua Kurek, Jane L. Kirk, Derek CG. Muir, Xiaowa Wang, Johan A. Wiklund, Colin A. Cooke, Marlene S. Evans, John P. Smol & Derek C. G. Muir
Freshwaters in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) are vulnerable to the atmospheric emissions and land disturbances caused by the local oil sands industry; however, they are also affected by climate change. Recent observations of increases in aquatic primary production near the main development area have prompted questions about the principal drivers of these limnological changes. Is the enhanced primary production due to deposition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) from local industry or from recent...

Data from: Unpredictable perturbation reduces breeding propensity regardless of pre-laying reproductive readiness in a partial capital breeder

Pierre Legagneux, Holly L. Hennin, H. Grant Gilchrist, Tony D. Williams, Oliver P. Love & Joël Bêty
Theoretically, individuals of migratory species should optimize reproductive investment based on a combination of timing of and body condition at arrival on the breeding grounds. A minimum threshold body mass is required to initiate reproduction, and the timing of reaching this threshold is critical because of the trade-off between delaying breeding to gain in condition against the declining value of offspring with later reproductive timing. Long-lived species have the flexibility within their life history to...

Data from: Demographic and spatiotemporal patterns of avian influenza infection at the continental scale, and in relation to annual life cycle of a migratory host

Rodolfo Nallar, Zsuzsanna Papp, Tasha Epp, Frederick A. Leighton, Seth R. Swafford, Thomas J. DeLiberto, Robert J. Dusek, Hon S. Ip, Jeffrey Hall, Johannes Berhane, Samantha E. J. Gibbs, Catherine Soos & Yohannes Berhane
Since the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in the eastern hemisphere, numerous surveillance programs and studies have been undertaken to detect the occurrence, distribution, or spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in wild bird populations worldwide. To identify demographic determinants and spatiotemporal patterns of AIV infection in long distance migratory waterfowl in North America, we fitted generalized linear models with binominal distribution to analyze results from 13,574 blue-winged teal (Anas discors, BWTE)...

Variance in lifetime reproductive success of male polar bears

Evan Richardson, Corey Davis, Ian Stirling, Andrew Derocher, Nicholas Lunn & René Malenfant
Despite the important role that population density plays in ecological and evolutionary processes, studies of solitary species that occur at low densities remain scarce. In the context of mating systems, density is expected to influence the ability of males to find and monopolize mates, in turn influencing variance in lifetime mating/reproductive success and the opportunity for selection. Herein we investigate variance in male lifetime mating success, lifetime reproductive success, and the mating system of a...

Maps of reporting facilities – virtual globe format

Paulo Costa &
The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is Canada's public inventory of pollutant releases (to air, water and land), disposals and transfers for recycling. Each file contains the NPRI map layers in a KMZ format that you can use with virtual globe software such as Google Earth™. Data are available for the last two reporting years. You can filter the data by province or industry type. Select a facility to view a report that summarizes its...

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