36 Works

The interplay of wind and uplift facilitates over-water flight in facultative soaring birds

Elham Nourani, Gil Bohrer, Paolo Becciu, Richard O Bierregaard, Olivier Duriez, Jordi Figuerola, Laura Gangoso, Sinos Giokas, Hiroyoshi Higuchi, Christina Kassara, Olga Kulikova, Nicolas Lecomte, Flavio Monti, Ivan Pokrovsky, Andrea Sforzi, Jean-François Therrien, Nikos Tsiopelas, Wouter MG Vansteelant, Duarte S Viana, Noriyuki M Yamaguchi, Martin Wikelski & Kamran Safi
Flying over the open sea is energetically costly for terrestrial birds. Despite this, over-water journeys of many birds, sometimes hundreds of kilometers long, are uncovered by bio-logging technology. To understand how these birds afford their flights over the open sea, we investigated the role of atmospheric conditions, specifically wind and uplift, in subsidizing over-water flight at the global scale. We first established that ∆T, the temperature difference between sea surface and air, is a meaningful...

Drivers of alloparental provisioning of fledglings in a colonially-breeding bird

Mina Ogino, Adriana Maldonado Chaparro & Damien Farine
Offspring provisioning represents a major reproductive cost. However, evidence suggests that parents sometimes feed unrelated offspring. Several hypotheses could explain this puzzling phenomenon. Adults could feed unrelated offspring that are (1) of close social associates to facilitate these juveniles’ integration into their social network (resulting in social inheritance), (2) potential extra-pair offspring, (3) at a similar developmental stage as their own, (4) coercing feeding by begging, or (5) less-developed and who’s enhanced survival would benefit...

Collective detection based on visual information in animal groups

Jacob D. Davidson, Matthew M. G. Sosna, Colin R. Twomey, Vivek H. Sridhar, Simon P. Leblanc & Iain D. Couzin
We investigate key principles underlying individual, and collective, visual detection of stimuli, and how this relates to the internal structure of groups. While the individual and collective detection principles are generally applicable, we employ a model experimental system of schooling golden shiner fish ( Notemigonus crysoleucas ) to relate theory directly to empirical data, using computational reconstruction of the visual fields of all individuals. This reveals how the external visual information available to each group...

Data from: Ecological factors influence balancing selection on leaf chemical profiles of a wildflower

Lauren Carley, Julius Mojica, Baosheng Wang, Chia-Yu Chen, Ya-Ping Lin, Kasavajhala Prasad, Emily Chan, Che-Wei Hsu, Rose Keith, Chase Nuñez, Carrie Olson-Manning, Catherine Rushworth, Maggie Wagner, Jing Wang, Pei-Min Yeh, Michael Reichelt, Kathryn Ghattas, Jonathan Gershenzon, Cheng-Ruei Lee & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Balancing selection is frequently invoked as a mechanism to maintain variation within and across populations. However, rigorous tests demonstrating balancing selection operating in nature are scarce, particularly on complex traits, which frequently display high levels of variation. Leveraging a focal polymorphism, leaf chemical profile in a perennial wildflower (Boechera stricta, Brassicaceae), we investigated the ecological and genetic mechanisms that may influence the maintenance of variation in this trait. A suite of common garden and greenhouse...

Data from: How to make methodological decisions when inferring social networks

André Ferreira, Rita Covas, Liliana Silva, Sandra Esteves, Inês Duarte, Rita Fortuna, Franck Theron, Claire Doutrelant & Damien Farine
Social network analyses allow studying the processes underlying the associations between individuals and the consequences of those associations. Constructing and analysing social networks can be challenging, especially when designing new studies as researchers are confronted with decisions about how to collect data and construct networks, and the answers are not always straightforward. The current lack of guidance on building a social network for a new study system might lead researchers to try several different methods,...

Individual variability and versatility in an eco-evolutionary model of avian migration

Benjamin M. Van Doren, Kira E. Delmore, Greg J. Conway, Teja Curk, Tania Garrido-Garduño, Ryan R. Germain, Timo Hasselmann, Dieter Hiemer, Henk Van Der Jeugd, Hannah Justen, Juan Sebastian Lugo Ramos, Ivan Maggini, Britta S. Meyer, Robbie J. Phillips, Magdalena Remisiewicz, Graham C. M. Roberts, Ben C. Sheldon, Wolfgang Vogl & Miriam Liedvogel
Seasonal migration is a complex and variable behavior with the potential to promote reproductive isolation. In Eurasian blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla), a migratory divide in central Europe separating populations with southwest and southeast autumn routes may facilitate isolation, and individuals using new wintering areas in Britain show divergence from Mediterranean winterers. We tracked 100 blackcaps in the wild to characterize these strategies. Blackcaps to the west and east of the divide used predominantly SW and SE...

Data from: First evidence of wasp brood development inside active nests of a termite with the description of a previously unknown potter wasp species

Helder Hugo, Marcel G. Hermes, Bolívar R. Garcete-Barrett & Iain D. Couzin
Potter wasps (Vespidae: Eumeninae) are known to exhibit not only sophisticated preying strategies but also a remarkable ability to manipulate clay during nest building. Due to a mixture of plasticity in building behaviour and flexibility in substrate preferences during nest-building, the group has been reported nesting in a variety of places, including decaying nests abandoned by termite species. Yet, evidence of wasps nesting inside senescent termite mounds is poorly reported and, to date, accounts confirming...

Ecological inference using data from accelerometers needs careful protocols

Baptiste Garde, Rory Wilson, Adam Fell, Nik Cole, Vikash Tatayah, Mark Holton, Kayleigh Rose, Richard Metcalfe, Hermina Robotka, Martin Wikelski, Fred Tremblay, Shannon Whelan, Kyle Elliott & Emily Shepard
1. Accelerometers in animal-attached tags have proven to be powerful tools in behavioural ecology, being used to determine behaviour and provide proxies for movement-based energy expenditure. Researchers are collecting and archiving data across systems, seasons and device types. However, in order to use data repositories to draw ecological inference, we need to establish the error introduced according to sensor type and position on the study animal and establish protocols for error assessment and minimization. 2....

Coevolution of relative brain size and life expectancy in parrots

Simeon Q. Smeele, Dalia A. Conde, Annette Baudisch, Simon Bruslund, Andrew Iwaniuk, Johanna Staerk, Timothy F. Wright, Anna M. Young, Mary Brooke McElreath & Lucy Aplin
Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between longevity and brain size in a variety of taxa. Little research has been devoted to understanding this link in parrots; yet parrots are well-known for both their exceptionally long lives and cognitive complexity. We employed a large-scale comparative analysis that investigated the influence of brain size and life history variables on longevity in parrots. Specifically, we addressed two hypotheses for evolutionary drivers of longevity: the Cognitive Buffer Hypothesis,...

Food for thought: Barro Colorado Island frugivore home range summaries

Shauhin Alavi, Roland Kays, Ben Hirsch, Rasmus Havmøller, Damien Caillaud & Margaret Crofoot
This dataset consists of home-range area summaries of four species of frugivores on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, including 12 kinkajou (Potos flavus), 16 white-nosed coati (Nasua narica), 8 white-faced capuchin monkey (Cebus capucinus), and 8 spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi). Summaries include effective sample sizes (DOF) as well as parameter estimates (in hectares) including upper and lower confidence intervals. Metadata for each individual are provided including their indivdual ID and species ID. The summaries of the...

Metabolic rate in common shrews is unaffected by temperature, leading to lower energetic costs through seasonal size reduction

Paul Schaeffer, M. Teague O'Mara, Japhet Breiholz, Lara Keicher, Javier Lázaro, Marion Muturi & Dina Dechmann
Small endothermic mammals have high metabolisms, particularly at cold temperatures. In light of this, some species have evolved a seemingly illogical strategy: they reduce the size of the brain and several organs to become even smaller in winter. To test how this morphological strategy affects energy consumption across seasonally shifting ambient temperatures, we measured oxygen consumption and behaviour in the three seasonal phenotypes of the common shrew (Sorex araneus), which differ in size by about...

Nonaggressive behavior: A strategy employed by an obligate nest invader to avoid conflict with its host species

Helder Hugo, Paulo F. Cristaldo & Og DeSouza
In addition to its builders, termite nests are known to house a variety of secondary opportunistic termite species so‐called inquilines, but little is known about the mechanisms governing the maintenance of these symbioses. In a single nest, host and inquiline colonies are likely to engage in conflict due to nestmate discrimination, and an intriguing question is how both species cope with each other in the long term. Evasive behaviour has been suggested as one of...

Data from: Socially foraging bats discriminate between group members based on search-phase echolocation calls

Jenna Kohles, Gerald Carter, Rachel A. Page & Dina Dechmann
Animals have evolved diverse strategies to use social information for increasing foraging success and efficiency. Echolocating bats, for example, can eavesdrop on bats foraging nearby, because they shift from search-phase calls to feeding buzzes when they detect prey. Feeding buzzes can directly convey information about prey presence, but it is unknown whether search-phase calls also convey social information. Here we investigated whether search-phase echolocation calls, distinct calls produced by some bat species to scan large...

Effect of ecological factors on fine-scale patterns of social structure in African lions

Moreangels Mbizah, Damien Farine, Marion Valeix, Jane Hunt, David Macdonald & Andrew Loveridge
1. Environmental variations can influence the extent to which individuals interact with other individuals by changing the value of grouping. It is well known that many species can form and disband groups, often in response to the distribution and abundance of resources. 2. While previous studies showed that resources influence the broad-scale structure of animal groups, knowledge gaps remain on whether they affect fine-scale patterns of association among individuals within groups. 3. We quantify association...

Data set for: Behavioral traits that define social dominance are the same that reduce social influence in a consensus task

Alex Jordan
Dominant individuals are often most influential in their social groups, affecting movement, opinion, and performance across species and contexts. Yet behavioral traits like aggression, intimidation, and coercion, which are associated with and in many cases define dominance, can be socially aversive. The traits that make dominant individuals influential in one context may therefore reduce their influence in other contexts. Here we examine this association between dominance and influence using the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, comparing...

Data for: Early-life behavior predicts first-year survival in a long-distance avian migrant

Shay Rotics, Martin Wikelski & Ran Nathan
Early-life conditions have critical, long-lasting effects on the fate of individuals, yet early-life activity has rarely been linked to subsequent survival of animals in the wild. Using high-resolution GPS and body-acceleration data of 93 juvenile white storks (Ciconia ciconia), we examined the links between behavior during both pre-fledging and post-fledging (fledging-to-migration) periods and subsequent first year survival. Juvenile daily activity (based on overall dynamic body acceleration) showed repeatable between-individual variation, the juveniles’ pre and post-fledging...

Hotspots in the grid: Avian sensitivity and vulnerability to collision risk from energy infrastructure interactions in Europe and North Africa

Jethro George Gauld, João P. Silva, Philip W. Atkinson, Paul Record, Marta Acácio, Volen Arkumarev, Julio Blas, Willem Bouten, Niall Burton, Inês Catry, Jocelyn Champagnon, Elizabeth A. Masden, Gary D. Clewley, Mindaugas Dagys, Olivier Duriez, Klaus‐Michael Exo, Wolfgang Fiedler, Andrea Flack, Guilad Friedemann, Johannes Fritz, Clara García-Ripollés, Stefan Garthe, Dimitri Giunchi, Atanas Grozdanov, Roi Harel … & Victoria Saravia
1. Wind turbines and power lines can cause bird mortality due to collision or electrocution. The biodiversity impacts of energy infrastructure (EI) can be minimised through effective landscape-scale planning and mitigation. The identification of high-vulnerability areas is urgently needed to assess potential cumulative impacts of EI while supporting the transition to zero-carbon energy. 2. We collected GPS location data from 1,454 birds from 27 species susceptible to collision within Europe and North Africa and identified...

Social and spatial conflict drive resident aggression towards outsiders in a group-living fish

Alex Jordan, Aneesh Bose & Jakob Guebel
Group-living animals often experience within-group competition for resources like shelter and space, as well as for social status. Because of this conflict, residents may aggressively resist joining attempts by new members. Here we asked whether different forms of competition mediate this response, specifically competition over i) shelter abundance, ii) spatial position within groups, and iii) social or sexual roles. We performed experiments on wild groups of Neolamprologus multifasciatus cichlids in Lake Tanganyika, either increasing or...

Data from: Drivers of site fidelity in ungulates

Thomas Morrison, Jerod Merkel, J. Grant Hopcraft, Ellen Aikens, Jeffrey Beck, Randall Boone, Alyson Courtemanch, Samantha Dwinnell, Sue Fairbanks, Brad Griffith, Arthur Middleton, Kevin Monteith, Brendan Oates, Louise Riotte-Lambert, Hall Sawyer, Kurt Smith, Jared Stabach, Kaitlyn Taylor & Matthew Kauffman
While the tendency to return to previously visited locations – termed ‘site fidelity’ – is common in animals, the cause of this behaviour is not well understood. One hypothesis is that site fidelity is shaped by an animal’s environment, such that animals living in landscapes with predictable resources have stronger site fidelity. Site fidelity may also be conditional on the success of animals’ recent visits to that location, and it may become stronger with age...

Fine-scale changes in speed and altitude suggest protean movements in homing pigeon flights

Baptiste Garde, Rory Wilson, Emmanouil Lempidakis, Luca Börger, Steven Portugal, Anders Hedenström, Giacomo Dell'Omo, Michael Quetting, Martin Wikelski & Emily L. C. Shepard
The power curve provides a basis for predicting adjustments that animals make in flight speed, for example in relation to wind, distance, habitat foraging quality and objective. However, relatively few studies have examined how animals respond to the landscape below them, which could affect speed and power allocation through modifications in climb rate and perceived predation risk. We equipped homing pigeons (Columba livia) with high-frequency loggers to examine how flight speed, and hence effort, varies...

Animal lifestyle affects acceptable mass limits for attached tags

Rory Wilson, Kayleigh Rose, Richard Gunner, Mark Holton, Nikki Marks, Nigel Bennett, Stephen Bell, Joshua Twining, Jamie Hesketh, Carlos Duarte, Neil Bezodis, Milos Jezek, Michael Painter, Vaclav Silovsky, Margaret Crofoot, Roi Harel, John Arnould, Blake Allan, Desley Whisson, Abdulaziz Alagaili & David Scantlebury
Animal-attached devices have transformed our understanding of vertebrate ecology. To minimize any associated harm, researchers have long advocated that tag masses should not exceed 3% of carrier body mass. However, this ignores tag forces resulting from animal movement. Using data from collar-attached accelerometers on 10 diverse free-ranging terrestrial species from koalas to cheetahs, we detail a tag-based acceleration method to clarify acceptable tag mass limits. We quantify animal athleticism in terms of fractions of animal...

Data and code from: Fruit bat migration matches green wave in seasonal landscapes

Edward Hurme, Jakob Fahr, Eidolon Monitoring Network, Eric Bakwo Fils, Iroro Tanshi, Heidi Richter, C Tom Hash, Natalie Weber, Martin Wikelski & Dina Dechmann
Migrating grazers and carnivores respond to seasonal changes in the environment and often match peaks in resource abundance. However, it is unclear if and how frugivorous animals use phenological events to time migration, especially in the tropics. The straw-colored fruit bat (Eidolon helvum), Africa’s most gregarious fruit bat, forms large seasonal colonies throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that aggregations of E. helvum match the timing of their migration with phenologies of plant growth...

Structural manipulations of a shelter resource reveal underlying preference functions in a shell-dwelling cichlid fish

Aneesh Bose, Johannes Windorfer, Alex Böhm, Fabrizia Ronco, Adrian Indermaur, Walter Salzburger & Alex Jordan
Many animals can modify the environments in which they live, thereby changing the selection pressures they experience. A common example of such niche-construction is the use, creation, or modification of environmental resources for use as nests or shelters. Because these resources often have correlated structural elements, it can be difficult to disentangle the relative contribution of these elements to resource choice, and the preference functions underlying niche-construction behaviour remain hidden. Here, we present an experimental...

Seasonal niche tracking of climate emerges at the population level in a migratory bird

Guillermo Fandos, Shay Rotics, Nir Sapir, Wolfgang Fiedler, Michael Kaatz, Martin Wikelski, Ran Nathan & Damaris Zurell
Seasonal animal migration is a widespread phenomenon. At the species level, it has been shown that many migratory animal species track similar climatic conditions throughout the year. However, it remains unclear whether such niche tracking pattern is a direct consequence of individual behaviour or emerges at the population or species level through behavioural variability. Here, we estimated seasonal niche overlap and seasonal niche tracking at the individual and population level of Central European White Storks...

Seasonal dietary niche contraction in coexisting Neotropical frugivorous bats (Stenodermatinae)

Jeremy Ryan Shipley & Cornelia Twining
Tropical dry forests are characterized by punctuated seasonal precipitation patterns that drive primary production and the availability of fruits, seeds, flowers, and insects throughout the year. In environments in which the quantity and quality of food resources varies seasonally, consumers should adjust their foraging behavior to maximize energy intake while minimizing overlap with competitors during periods of low food availability. Here, we investigated how the diets of frugivorous bats in tropical dry forests of NW...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    5
  • 2021
    13
  • 2020
    18

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    36

Affiliations

  • Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior
    36
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    3
  • The Ohio State University
    3
  • Hebrew University of Jerusalem
    3
  • Swansea University
    3
  • University of Konstanz
    3
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    2
  • Princeton University
    2
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    2
  • University of Siena
    2