4 Works

Data from: Genome sequence of dwarf birch (Betula nana) and cross-species RAD markers

Nian Wang, Marian Thomson, William J. A. Bodles, Robert M. M. Crawford, Harriet V. Hunt, Alan Watson Featherstone, Jaume Pellicer & Richard J. A. Buggs
New sequencing technologies allow development of genome-wide markers for any genus of ecological interest, including plant genera such as Betula (birch) that have previously proved difficult to study due to widespread polyploidy and hybridisation. We present a de novo reference genome sequence assembly, from 67X short read coverage, of Betula nana (dwarf birch) – a diploid that is the keystone woody species of sub-arctic scrub communities but of conservation concern in Britain. We also present...

Data from: Comparative genomics of chemosensory protein genes reveals rapid evolution and positive selection in ant-specific duplicates

Jonna Kulmuni, Yannick Wurm & Pekka Pamilo
Gene duplications can have a major role in adaptation, and gene families underlying chemosensation are particularly interesting due to their essential role in chemical recognition of mates, predators and food resources. Social insects add yet another dimension to the study of chemosensory genomics, as the key components of their social life rely on chemical communication. Still, chemosensory gene families are little studied in social insects. Here we annotated chemosensory protein (CSP) genes from seven ant...

Data from: Alarming features: birds use specific acoustic properties to identify heterospecific alarm calls

Pamela M. Fallow, Benjamin J. Pitcher & Robert D. Magrath
Vertebrates that eavesdrop on heterospecific alarm calls must distinguish alarms from sounds that can safely be ignored, but the mechanisms for identifying heterospecific alarm calls are poorly understood. While vertebrates learn to identify heterospecific alarms through experience, some can also respond to unfamiliar alarm calls that are acoustically similar to conspecific alarm calls. We used synthetic calls to test the role of specific acoustic properties in alarm call identification by superb fairy wrens, Malurus cyaneus....

Data from: Historical introgression and the persistence of ghost alleles in the intermediate horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus affinis)

Xiuguang Mao, Guimei He, Panyu Hua, Gareth Jones, Shuyi Zhang & Stephen J. Rossiter
Phylogenetic conflicts between genetic markers can help to disentangle complex histories of phylogeography and introgression among taxa. We previously proposed that the Chinese mainland subspecies of the intermediate horseshoe bat Rhinolophus affinis himalayanus colonized Hainan Island to form the subspecies R. a. hainanus. Subsequent recolonization of the mainland formed a third taxon, R. a macrurus, and a secondary contact zone with the ancestral himalayanus. To test for historical and recurrent genetic exchange between these mainland...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Queen Mary University of London
    4
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • East China Normal University
    1
  • University of St Andrews
    1
  • University of Oulu
    1
  • University of Helsinki
    1
  • University of London
    1