7 Works

Data from: An inordinate fondness for beetles? Variation in seasonal dietary preferences of night roosting big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus)

Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson & Melville Brockett Fenton
Generalist species with numerous food web interactions are thought to provide stability to ecosystem dynamics; however, it is not always clear whether habitat generality translates into dietary diversity. Big brown bats are common across North America and employ a flexible foraging strategy over water, dense forests, forest edges and rural and urban settings. Despite this generalist use of habitat, they are paradoxically characterized as beetle specialists. However, hard carapaces may preferentially survive digestion leading to...

Data from: Diet of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus nathusii during autumn migration and summer residence

Frauke Krüger, Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Oskars Keišs & Gunārs Pētersons
Migration is widespread among vertebrates. Yet bat migration has received little attention and only in the recent decades knowledge of it has been gained. Migration can cause significant changes in behaviour and physiology, due to increasing energy demands and aerodynamic constraints. Dietary shifts, for examples, have been shown to occur in birds before onset of migration. For bats it is not known if a change in diet occurs during migration, although especially breeding season related...

Data from: An integrative approach to detect subtle trophic niche differentiation in the sympatric trawling bat species Myotis dasycneme and Myotis daubentonii

Frauke Krüger, Elizabeth L. Clare, Stefan Greif, Bjoern M. Siemers, William O. C. Symondson & Robert S. Sommer
Bats are well known for species richness and ecological diversity thus they provide a good opportunity to study relationships and interaction between species. To assess interactions we consider distinct traits which are likely to be triggered by niche shape and evolutionary processes. We present data on the trophic niche differentiation between two sympatric European trawling bat species, Myotis dasycneme and M. daubentonii, incorporating a wide spectrum of methodological approaches. We measure morphological traits involved in...

Data from: The diet of Myotis lucifugus across Canada: assessing foraging quality and diet variability

Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Hugh Broders, François Fabianek, Erin E. Frazer, Alistair MacKenzie, Andrew Boughen, Rachel Hamilton, Craig K. R. Willis, Felix Martinez-Nuñez, Allyson K. Menzies, Kaleigh J. O. Norquay, Mark Brigham, Joseph Poissant, Jody Rintoul, Robert M. R. Barclay, Jesika P. Reimer & Erin E. Fraser
Variation in prey resources influences the diet and behaviour of predators. When prey become limiting, predators may travel farther to find preferred food or adjust to existing local resources. When predators are habitat limited, local resource abundance impacts foraging success. We analysed the diet of Myotis lucifugus (little brown bats) from Nova Scotia (eastern Canada) to the Northwest Territories (north-western Canada). This distribution includes extremes of season length and temperature and encompasses colonies on rural...

Data from: Resource partitioning by insectivorous bats in Jamaica

Matthew A. Emrich, Elizabeth L. Clare, William O. C. Symondson, Susan E. Koenig & Melville Brock Fenton
In this investigation, we use variation in wing morphology, echolocation behaviour, patterns of habitat use and molecular diet analysis to demonstrate that six species of sympatric insectivorous bats in Jamaica show significant differences that could explain resource partitioning among the species. High-intensity echolocating species that used shorter, broadband signals and had shorter, broader wings (Pteronotus macleayii, Pteronotus quadridens, Mormoops blainvillii) foraged most in edge habitats, but differed in timing of peak activity. P. macleayii and...

Data from: Multiple cases of asymmetric introgression among horseshoe bats detected by phylogenetic conflicts across loci

Xiuguang Mao, Vu D. Thong, Paul J. J. Bates, Gareth Jones, Shuyi Zhang & Stephen J. Rossiter
Phylogenetic discordance among taxa can provide powerful insights into past episodes of introgressive hybridization, as well as lineage sorting. Previously, we showed that the taxonomically distinct taxon Rhinolophus sinicus septentrionalis has undergone historical introgression with its sympatric sister subspecies Rhinolophus sinicus sinicus. To examine in more detail the extent of gene flow between these two taxa, and also between these and their sister species Rhinolophus thomasi, we obtained new samples from China, Myanmar, and Vietnam,...

Data from: The evolution of bat vestibular systems in the face of potential antagonistic selection pressures for flight and echolocation

Kalina T. J. Davies, Paul J. J. Bates, Ibnu Maryanto, James A. Cotton & Stephen J. Rossiter
The vestibular system maintains the body’s sense of balance and, therefore, was probably subject to strong selection during evolutionary transitions in locomotion. Among mammals, bats possess unique traits that place unusual demands on their vestibular systems. First, bats are capable of powered flight, which in birds is associated with enlarged semicircular canals. Second, many bats have enlarged cochleae associated with echolocation, and both cochleae and semicircular canals share a space within the petrosal bone. To...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Queen Mary University of London
    7
  • Cardiff University
    4
  • Western University
    3
  • Kiel University
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Saint Mary's University
    1
  • University of Winnipeg
    1
  • East China Normal University
    1
  • Indonesian Institute of Sciences
    1
  • University of Regina
    1