9 Works

Data from: Speciation by genome duplication: repeated origins and genomic composition of the recently formed allopolyploid species Mimulus peregrinus

Mario Vallejo-Marin, Richard J. A. Buggs, Arielle M. Cooley & Joshua R. Puzey
Whole genome duplication (polyploidisation) is a mechanism of “instantaneous” species formation that has played a major role in the evolutionary history of plants. Much of what we know about the early evolution of polyploids is based upon studies of a handful of recently formed species. A new polyploid hybrid (allopolyploid) species Mimulus peregrinus, formed within the last 140 years, was recently discovered on the Scottish mainland and corroborated by chromosome counts. Here, using targeted, high-depth...

Data from: Resources alter the structure and increase stochasticity in bromeliad microfauna communities

Jana S. Petermann, Pavel Kratina, Nicolas A. C. Marino, A. Andrew M. MacDonald, Diane S. Srivastava & Nicholas A. C. Marino
Although stochastic and deterministic processes have been found to jointly shape structure of natural communities, the relative importance of both forces may vary across different environmental conditions and across levels of biological organization. We tested the effects of abiotic environmental conditions, altered trophic interactions and dispersal limitation on the structure of aquatic microfauna communities in Costa Rican tank bromeliads. Our approach combined natural gradients in environmental conditions with experimental manipulations of bottom-up interactions (resources), top-down...

Elemental cycling in recently deglaciated landscapes, Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

E.T. Malone, B.W. Abbott, M.J. Klaar, C. Kidd, M. Sébilo, A. Milner & G. Pinay
This data set includes soil chemical, physical and microbial properties collected across a two-century glacial chronosequence across six streams in Glacier Bay, Southeast Alaska, U.S.A. We measured soil potential nitrification, denitrification, as well as stable isotopes (delta-15N and delta-13C) of leaves and soil to establish how physical and biological changes associated with ecosystem development interact to determine rates of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) turnover. Secondly, how these interactions were reflected in the isotopic signature...

Data from: Dietary overlap and seasonality in three species of mormoopid bats from a tropical dry forest

Valeria B. Salinas-Ramos, Luis Gerardo Herrera Montalvo, Virginia León-Regagnon, Aitor Arrizabalaga-Escudero & Elizabeth L. Clare
Competing hypotheses explaining species’ use of resources have been advanced. Resource limitations in habitat and/or food are factors that affect assemblages of species. These limitations could drive the evolution of morphological and/or behavioural specialization, permitting the coexistence of closely related species through resource partitioning and niche differentiation. Alternatively, when resources are unlimited, fluctuations in resources availability will cause concomitant shifts in resource use regardless of species identity. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to test these...

Data from: Using an insect mushroom body circuit to encode route memory in complex natural environments

Paul Ardin, Fei Peng, Michael Mangan, Konstantinos Lagogiannis & Barbara Webb
Ants, like many other animals, use visual memory to follow extended routes through complex environments, but it is unknown how their small brains implement this capability. The mushroom body neuropils have been identified as a crucial memory circuit in the insect brain, but their function has mostly been explored for simple olfactory association tasks. We show that a spiking neural model of this circuit originally developed to describe fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster) olfactory association, can also...

Data from: Evidence for a pervasive ‘idling-mode’ activity template in flying and pedestrian insects

Andrew M. Reynolds, Hayley B. C. Jones, Jane K. Hill, Aislinn J. Pearson, Kenneth Wilson, Stephan Wolf, Ka S. Lim, Donald R. Reynolds & Jason W. Chapman
Understanding the complex movement patterns of animals in natural environments is a key objective of ‘movement ecology’. Complexity results from behavioural responses to external stimuli but can also arise spontaneously in their absence. Drawing on theoretical arguments about decision-making circuitry, we predict that the spontaneous patterns will be scale-free and universal, being independent of taxon and mode of locomotion. To test this hypothesis, we examined the activity patterns of the European honeybee, and multiple species...

Data from: Speciation processes in putative island endemic sister bat species: false impressions from mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite data

Hao-Chih Kuo, Shiang-Fan Chen, Yin-Ping Fang, James A. Cotton, Joe D. Parker, Gábor Csorba, Burton K. Lim, Judith L. Eger, Chia-Hong Chen, Cheng-Han Chou & Stephen J. Rossiter
Cases of geographically restricted co-occurring sister taxa are rare and may point to potential divergence with gene flow. The two bat species Murina gracilis and M. recondita are both endemic to Taiwan and are putative sister species. To test for non-allopatric divergence and gene flow in these taxa, we generated sequences using Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing, and combined these with microsatellite data for coalescent-based analyses. MtDNA phylogenies supported the reciprocally monophyletic sister relationship between...

Data from: A phylogenomic analysis of the role and timing of molecular adaptation in the aquatic transition of cetartiodactyl mammals

Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Michael R. McGowen, Kalina T. J. Davies, Simon Jarman, Andrea Polanowski, Mads F. Bertelsen & Stephen J. Rossiter
Recent studies have reported multiple cases of molecular adaptation in cetaceans related to their aquatic abilities. However, none of these has included the hippopotamus, precluding an understanding of whether molecular adaptations in cetaceans occurred before or after they split from their semi-aquatic sister taxa. Here, we obtained new transcriptomes from the hippopotamus and humpback whale, and analysed these together with available data from eight other cetaceans. We identified more than 11 000 orthologous genes and...

Data from: Warming alters food web-driven changes in the CO2 flux of experimental pond ecosystems

Trisha B. Atwood, Edd Hammill, Pavel Kratina, Hamish S. Greig, Jonathan B. Shurin & John S. Richardson
Evidence shows the important role biota play in the carbon cycle, and strategic management of plant and animal populations could enhance CO2 uptake in aquatic ecosystems. However, it is currently unknown how management-driven changes to community structure may interact with climate warming and other anthropogenic perturbations to alter CO2 fluxes. Here we showed that under ambient water temperatures, predators (three-spined stickleback) and nutrient enrichment synergistically increased primary producer biomass, resulting in increased CO2 uptake by...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    9

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9

Affiliations

  • Queen Mary University of London
    9
  • University of British Columbia
    2
  • University of London
    2
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • University of Greenwich
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Royal Ontario Museum
    1
  • University of Maine
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • National Autonomous University of Mexico
    1