114 Works

Data from: Comparing traditional and Bayesian approaches to ecological meta-analysis

Paula Pappalardo, Kiona Ogle, Elizabeth Hamman, James Bence, Bruce Hungate & Craig Osenberg
1. Despite the wide application of meta-analysis in ecology, some of the traditional methods used for meta-analysis may not perform well given the type of data characteristic of ecological meta-analyses. 2. We reviewed published meta-analyses on the ecological impacts of global climate change, evaluating the number of replicates used in the primary studies (ni) and the number of studies or records (k) that were aggregated to calculate a mean effect size. We used the results...

Thoracic gas compression during forced expiration is greater in men than women

Elizabeth Gideon, Troy Cross, Brooke Cayo, Aaron Betts, Dallin Merrell, Catherine Coriell, Lauren Hays & Joseph Duke
Intrapleural pressure during a forced vital capacity (VC) manoeuvre is often in excess of that required to generate maximal expiratory airflow. This excess pressure compresses alveolar gas (i.e., thoracic gas compression; TGC), resulting in underestimated forced expiratory flows (FEFs) at a given lung volume. It is unknown if TGC is influenced by sex; however, because men have larger lungs and stronger respiratory muscles, we hypothesized that men would have greater TGC. We examined TGC across...

Data from: Non-native insects dominate daytime pollination in a high-elevation Hawaiian dryland ecosystem

Clare E. Aslan, Aaron B. Shiels, William Haines & Christina T. Liang
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Over one-third of the native flowering plant species in the Hawaiian Islands are listed as federally Threatened or Endangered. Lack of sufficient pollination could contribute to reductions in populations, reproduction, and genetic diversity among these species, but has been little studied. METHODS: We used systematic observations and manual flower treatments to quantify flower visitation and outcrossing dependency of eight native (including four Endangered) plant species in a dryland ecosystem in Hawaii:...

Data from: Within-species patterns challenge our understanding of the Leaf Economics Spectrum

Leander D.L. Anderegg, Logan T. Berner, Grayson Badgley, Meera L. Sethi, Beverly E. Law, Janneke HilleRisLambers & Leander D. L. Anderegg
The utility of plant functional traits for predictive ecology relies on our ability to interpret trait variation across multiple taxonomic and ecological scales. Using extensive datasets of trait variation within species, across species, and across communities, we analyzed whether and at what scales ‘leaf economics spectrum’ (LES) traits show predicted trait-trait covariation. We found that most variation in LES traits is often, but not universally, at high taxonomic levels (between families, between genera in a...

Data from: Plant genetics and interspecific competitive interactions determine ectomycorrhizal fungal community responses to climate change

Catherine A. Gehring, Dulce Flores-Rentería, Christopher M. Sthultz, Tierra M. Leonard, Lluvia Flores-Rentería, Amy V. Whipple, Thomas G. Whitham & Catherine Gehring
Although the importance of plant-associated microbes is increasingly recognized, little is known about the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the composition of that microbiome. We examined the influence of plant genetic variation, and two stressors, one biotic and one abiotic, on the ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal community of a dominant tree species, Pinus edulis. During three periods across 16 years that varied in drought severity, we sampled the EM fungal communities of a wild stand...

Data from: A global perspective on Campanulaceae: biogeographic, genomic, and floral evolution

Andrew A. Crowl, Nicholas W. Miles, Clayton J. Visger, Kimberly Hansen, Tina Ayers, Rosemarie Haberle & Nico Cellinese
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: The Campanulaceae are a diverse clade of flowering plants encompassing more than 2300 species in myriad habitats from tropical rainforests to arctic tundra. A robust, multigene phylogeny, including all major lineages, is presented to provide a broad, evolutionary perspective of this cosmopolitan clade. METHODS: We used a phylogenetic framework, in combination with divergence dating, ancestral range estimation, chromosome modeling, and morphological character reconstruction analyses to infer phylogenetic placement and timing of...

Data from: Parallel evolutionary forces influence the evolution of male and female songs in a tropical songbird

Brendan A. Graham, Daniel D. Heath, Ryan P. Walter, Melissa M. Mark & Daniel J. Mennill
Given the important role that animal vocalizations play in mate attraction and resource defence, acoustic signals are expected to play a significant role in speciation. Most studies, however, have focused on the acoustic traits of male animals living in the temperate zone. In contrast to temperate environments, in the tropics it is commonplace for both sexes to produce complex acoustic signals. Therefore tropical birds offer the opportunity to compare the sexes and provide a more...

Data from: Warming reduces the growth and diversity of biological soil crusts in a semi-arid environment: implications for ecosystem structure and functioning

Cristina Escolar, Isabel Martínez, Matthew A. Bowker, Fernando T. Maestre & I. Martinez
Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are key biotic components of dryland ecosystems worldwide that control many functional processes, including carbon and nitrogen cycling, soil stabilization, and infiltration. Regardless of their ecological importance and prevalence in drylands, very few studies have explicitly evaluated how climate change will affect the structure and composition of BSCs, and the functioning of their constituents. Using a manipulative experiment conducted over three years in a semi-arid site from central Spain, we evaluated...

Data from: Tree genetics strongly affect forest productivity, but intraspecific diversity-productivity relationships do not

Dylan G. Fischer, Gina M. Wimp, Erika Hersch-Green, Randy K. Bangert, Carri J. LeRoy, Joseph K. Bailey, Jennifer A. Schweitzer, Clarissa Dirks, Stephen C. Hart, Gerard J. Allan & Thomas G. Whitham
Numerous studies have demonstrated biodiversity–productivity relationships in plant communities, and analogous genetic diversity–productivity studies using genotype mixtures of single species may show similar patterns. Alternatively, competing individuals among genotypes within a species are less likely to exhibit resource-use complementarity, even when they exhibit large differences in their effects on ecosystem function. In this study, we test the impact of genotype diversity and genetic identity on ecosystem function using an ecosystem-scale common garden experiment. Distinct tree...

Data from: Mycorrhizal symbioses influence the trophic structure of the Serengeti

Bo Maxwell Stevens, Jeffrey Propster, Gail W. T. Wilson, Andrew Abraham, Chase Ridenour, Chris Doughty, Nancy Collins Johnson & Christopher Doughty
It is known that tropical grasslands such as Serengeti host large populations of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and that they respond to abiotic and biotic factors. It is also known that AM symbioses are important for the uptake of essential plant nutrients, which, in turn, influences the biomass and nutritional quality of herbivores and their predators. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of AM symbioses on the biomass of different trophic...

Change in terrestrial human footprint drives continued loss of intact ecosystems

Brooke Williams, Oscar Venter, James Allan, Scott Atkinson, Jose Rehbein, Michelle Ward, Moreno Di Marco, Hedley Grantham, Jamison Ervin, Scott Goetz, Andrew Hansen, Patrick Jantz, Rajeev Pillay, Susana Rodríguez-Buriticá, Christina Supples, Anne Virnig & James Watson
Human pressure mapping is important for understanding humanity's role in shaping Earth’s patterns and processes. Our ability to map this influence has evolved, thanks to powerful computing, earth observing satellites, and new bottom-up census and crowd-sourced data. Here, we provide the latest temporally inter-comparable maps of the terrestrial human footprint, and assessment of change in human pressure at global, biome, and ecoregional scales. In 2013, 42% of terrestrial Earth could be considered relatively free of...

Data from: Resistance of soil biota and plant growth to disturbance increases with plant diversity

Jonathan Bennett, Alexander Koch, Jennifer Forsythe, Nancy Johnson, David Tilman & John Klironomos
Plant diversity is critical to the functioning of ecosystems, potentially mediated in part by interactions with soil biota. Here, we characterized multiple groups of soil biota across a plant diversity gradient in a long-term experiment. We then subjected soil samples taken along this gradient to drought, freezing, and a mechanical disturbance to test how plant diversity affects the responses of soil biota and growth of a focal plant to these disturbances. High plant diversity resulted...

Gross primary production responses to warming, elevated CO2 , and irrigation: quantifying the drivers of ecosystem physiology in a semiarid grassland

Elise Pendall, Edmund M. Ryan, Kiona Ogle, Drew Peltier, David G. Williams, Anthony P. Walker, Martin G. De Kauwe, Belinda E. Medlyn, William Parton, Shinichi Asao, Bertrand Guenet, Anna B. Harper, Xingjie Lu, Kristina A. Luus, Sönke Zaehle, Shijie Shu, Christian Werner & Jianyang Xia
Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will be a source or sink of carbon (C) under a future climate of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming requires accurate quantification of gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux of C in the global C cycle. We evaluated 6 years (2007–2012) of flux‐derived GPP data from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, situated in a grassland in Wyoming, USA. The GPP data were used to calibrate a...

Estimating social-ecological resilience: fire management futures in the Sonoran Desert

Clare Aslan, Manette Sandor, Martha Sample, Sasha Stortz, Sara Souther, Carrie Levine, Leah Samberg, Miranda Gray & Brett Dickson
Resilience quantifies the ability of a system to remain in or return to its current state following disturbance. Due to inconsistent terminology and usage of resilience frameworks, quantitative resilience studies are challenging, and resilience is often treated as an abstract concept rather than a measurable system characteristic. We used a novel, spatially-explicit stakeholder engagement process to quantify social-ecological resilience to fire, in light of modeled social-ecological fire risk, across the non-fire-adapted Sonoran Desert Ecosystem in...

Data from: Submerged macrophytes affect the temporal variability of aquatic ecosystems

Moritz Lürig, Rebecca Best, Vasilis Dakos & Blake Matthews
1. Submerged macrophytes are important foundation species that can strongly influence the structure and functioning of aquatic ecosystems, but only little is known about the temporal variation and the timescales of these effects (i.e. from hourly, daily, to monthly). 2. Here, we conducted an outdoor experiment in replicated mesocosms (1000 L) where we manipulated the presence and absence of macrophytes to investigate the temporal variability of their ecosystem effects. We measured several parameters (chlorophyll-a, phycocyanin,...

Data from: Large effect quantitative trait loci for salicinoid phenolic glycosides in Populus: implications for gene discovery

Scott A. Woolbright, Brian J. Rehill, Richard L. Lindroth, Stephen P. DiFazio, Gregory D. Martinsen, Mathew S. Zinkgraf, Gerard J. Allan, Paul Keim, Thomas G. Whitham & Matthew S. Zinkgraf
Genomic studies have been used to identify genes underlying many important plant secondary metabolic pathways. However, genes for salicinoid phenolic glycosides (SPGs)—ecologically important compounds with significant commercial, cultural, and medicinal applications—remain largely undescribed. We used a linkage map derived from a full‐sib population of hybrid cottonwoods (Populus spp.) to search for quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the SPGs salicortin and HCH‐salicortin. SSR markers and primer sequences were used to anchor the map to the V3.0...

Native biodiversity collapse in the Eastern Mediterranean

Paolo G. Albano, Jan Steger, Marija Bošnjak, Beata Dunne, Zara Guifarro, Elina Turapova, Quan Hua, Darrell Kaufman, Gil Rilov & Martin Zuschin
Global warming causes the poleward shift of the trailing edges of marine ectotherm species distributions. In the semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea, continental masses and oceanographic barriers do not allow natural connectivity with thermophilic species pools: as trailing edges retreat, a net diversity loss occurs. We quantify this loss on the Israeli shelf, among the warmest areas in the Mediterranean, by comparing current native molluscan richness with the historical one obtained from surficial death assemblages. We recorded...

Species asynchrony stabilises productivity under extreme drought across Northern China grasslands

Taofeek O. Muraina, Chong Xu, Qiang Yu, Yadong Yang, Minghui Jing, Xiaotong Jia, , Quockhanh Dam, Alan K. Knapp, Scott L. Collins, Yiqi Luo, Wentao Luo, Xiaoan Zuo, Xiaoping Xin, Xingguo Han & Melinda D. Smith
1. Biodiversity can stabilise productivity through different mechanisms, such as asynchronous species responses to environmental variability and species stability. Global changes, like intensified drought, could negatively affect species richness, species asynchrony, and species stability, but it is unclear how changes in these mechanisms will affect stability of aboveground primary productivity (ANPP) across ecosystems. 2. We studied the effects of a 4-year extreme drought on ANPP stability and the underlying mechanisms (species richness, species asynchrony, and...

Data from: Modeling multilocus selection in an individual-based, spatially-explicit landscape genetics framework

Erin Landguth, Brenna R. Forester, Andrew J. Eckert, Andrew J. Shirk, Mitra Menon, Amy Whipple, Casey C. Day & Samuel A. Cushman
We implemented multilocus selection in a spatially-explicit, individual-based framework that enables multivariate environmental gradients to drive selection in many loci as a new module for the landscape genetics programs, CDPOP and CDMetaPOP. Our module simulates multilocus selection using a linear additive model, providing a flexible platform to evaluate a wide range of genotype-environment associations. Importantly, the module allows simulation of selection in any number of loci under the influence of any number of environmental variables....

Bats use live fences to move between tropical dry forest remnants

Jose G. Martinez-Fonseca, Marlon Chavez-Velasquez, Kimberly Williams-Guillen & Carol Chambers
Linear features can benefit wildlife by assisting animal movement. We captured bats along barbed-wire and live-tree fences connecting Tropical Dry Forest patches in Nicaragua. Bat species richness and captures were higher along live fences but we noted differences in sex ratios, richness, and species composition compared to surrounding natural forests.

Dataset accompanying Buscombe et al.: Human-in-the-loop segmentation of earth surface imagery

Daniel Buscombe, Evan Goldstein, Christopher Sherwood, Cameron Bodine, Jaycee Favela, Sharon Fitzpatrick, Christine Kranenburg, Jin-Si Over, Jenna Brown, Andrew Ritchie, Jonathan Warrick & Phillipe Wernette
The datasets used in this study are provided in 7 folders: “dataset A”, containing data from Sandwich Town Neck Beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. These images are published as a USGS data series (Sherwood et al., 2021) are publicly available at https://doi.org/10.5066/P9BFD3YH “dataset B”, containing data from North and South Carolina collected immediately after Hurricane Florence in October 2018. National Geodetic Survey emergency response imagery courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, available at...

Data from: A changing climate is snuffing out post-fire recovery in montane forests

Kyle Rodman, Thomas Veblen, Mike Battaglia, Marin Chambers, Paula Fornwalt, Zachary Holden, Thomas Kolb, Jessica Ouzts & Monica Rother
Aim: Climate warming is increasing fire activity in many of Earth’s forested ecosystems. Because fire is an important catalyst for change, investigation of post-fire vegetation response is crucial for understanding the potential for future conversions from forest to non-forest vegetation types. To better understand effects of wildfire and climate warming on forest recovery, we assessed the extent to which climate and terrain influence spatiotemporal variation in past and future post-fire tree regeneration. Location: Montane forests,...

Ensemble model output of North American atmospheric CO2 simulation (full WRF-chem output)

S. Feng, T. Lauvaux, K.J. Davis, K. Keller, R. Rayner, T. Oda, K. Gurney, Y. Zhou, C. Williams, A.E. Schuh, J. Liu & I. Baker
The uncertainty in biospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) flux estimates drives divergent projections of future climate and uncertainty in prescriptions for climate mitigation. The terrestrial carbon sink can be inferred from atmospheric CO2 observations with transport models via inversion methods. Regional CO2 flux estimates remain uncertain due to the mixture of uncertainties caused by transport models, prior estimates of biospheric fluxes, large-scale CO2 boundary inflow, the assumptions in the inversion process, and the limited density of...

Allometric modelling of plant biomass from drone-acquired photographs: drone images, ground control marker coordinates and biomass data from 36 sites, 2016-2020

A. Cunliffe, K. Anderson, F. Boschetti, H. Graham, R. Brazier, I. Myers-Smith, T. Astor, M. Boer, L. Calvo, P. Clark, M. Cramer, M. Encinas-Lara, S. Escarzaga, J. Fernández-Guisuraga, A. Fisher, K. Gdulová, B. Gillespie, A. Griebel, N. Hanan, M. Hanggito, S. Haselberger, C. Havrilla, W. Ji, J. Karl, M. Kirchhoff … & R. Wojcikiewicz
This dataset contains RGB photographs acquired from drone surveys. There are 741 harvest plots from 38 surveys at 36 sites around the world. Each site was approximately 1 ha in area. Included with the photographic images are the coordinates of ground control markers, biomass, taxonomic and location data for harvest plots and ancillary metadata. The observations can be used to obtain allometric size-biomass models. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award...

Data from: Agonistic character displacement in social cognition of advertisement signals

Bret Pasch, Rachel Sanford & Steven M. Phelps
Interspecific aggression between sibling species may enhance discrimination of competitors when recognition errors are costly, but proximate mechanisms mediating increased discriminative ability are unclear. We studied behavioral and neural mechanisms underlying responses to conspecific and heterospecific vocalizations in Alston’s singing mouse (Scotinomys teguina), a species in which males sing to repel rivals. We performed playback experiments using males in allopatry and sympatry with a dominant heterospecific (Scotinomys xerampelinus) and examined song-evoked induction of egr-1 in...

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