9 Works

Data from: Predator-prey interactions between shell-boring beetle larvae and rock-dwelling land snails

Els Baalbergen, Renate Helwerda, Rense Schelfhorst, Ruth F. Castillo Cajas, Coline H. M. Van Moorsel, Robin Kundrata, Francisco W. Welter-Schultes, Sinos Giokas & Menno Schilthuizen
Drilus beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are specialized predators of land snails. Here, we describe various aspects of the predator-prey interactions between multiple Drilus species attacking multiple Albinaria (Gastropoda: Clausiliidae) species in Greece. We observe that Drilus species may be facultative or obligate Albinaria-specialists. We map geographically varying predation rates in Crete, where on average 24% of empty shells carry fatal Drilus bore holes. We also provide first-hand observations and video-footage of prey entry and exit...

Data from: Female song is widespread and ancestral in songbirds

Karan J. Odom, Michelle L. Hall, Katharina Riebel, Kevin E. Omland & Naomi E. Langmore
Bird song has historically been considered an almost exclusively male trait, an observation fundamental to the formulation of Darwin’s theory of sexual selection. Like other male ornaments, song is used by male songbirds to attract females and compete with rivals. Thus, bird song has become a textbook example of the power of sexual selection to lead to extreme neurological and behavioural sex differences. Here we present an extensive survey and ancestral state reconstruction of female...

Data from: On the fate of seasonally plastic traits in a rainforest butterfly under relaxed selection

Vicencio Oostra, Paul M. Brakefield, Yvonne Hiltemann, Bas J. Zwaan & Oskar Brattström
Many organisms display phenotypic plasticity as adaptation to seasonal environmental fluctuations. Often, such seasonal responses entails plasticity of a whole suite of morphological and life-history traits that together contribute to the adaptive phenotypes in the alternative environments. While phenotypic plasticity in general is a well-studied phenomenon, little is known about the evolutionary fate of plastic responses if natural selection on plasticity is relaxed. Here, we study whether the presumed ancestral seasonal plasticity of the rainforest...

Data from: Long-term experimental warming alters community composition of ascomycetes in Alaskan moist and dry arctic tundra

Tatiana A. Semenova, Luis N. Morgado, Jeffrey M. Welker, Marilyn D. Walker, Erik Smets & József Geml
Arctic tundra regions have been responding to global warming with visible changes in plant community composition, including expansion of shrubs and declines in lichens and bryophytes. Even though it is well-known that the majority of arctic plants are associated with their symbiotic fungi, how fungal community composition will be different with climate warming remains largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the effects of long-term (18 years) experimental warming on the community composition and taxonomic...

Data from: Individual performance in relation to cytonuclear discordance in a northern contact zone between long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) lineages

Julie A. Lee-Yaw, Chris G. C. Jacobs & Darren E. Irwin
Cytonuclear discordance in contact zones between related lineages is common, with mitochondrial clines often being displaced from clines in nuclear allele frequency. Proposed explanations for such a pattern include adaptive introgression of mtDNA or a neutral wake of mtDNA being left behind following hybrid zone movement. However, studies investigating these hypotheses are rare. Our previous survey of genetic variation in the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) highlighted a potential case of cytonuclear discordance between two lineages...

Data from: The plastic fly: the effect of sustained fluctuations in adult food supply on life history traits

Joost Van Den Heuvel, Jelle Zandveld, Maarten Mulder, Paul M. Brakefield, Thomas B. L. Kirkwood, Daryl P. Shanley & Bas J. Zwaan
Many adult traits in Drosophila melanogaster show phenotypic plasticity, and the effects of diet on traits such as lifespan and reproduction are well explored. Although plasticity in response to food is still present in older flies, it is unknown how sustained environmental variation affects life-history traits. Here, we explore how such life-long fluctuations of food supply affect weight and survival in groups of flies and affect weight, survival and reproduction in individual flies. In both...

Data from: Large-scale fungal diversity assessment in the Andean Yungas forests reveals strong community turnover among forest types along an altitudinal gradient

József Geml, Nicolás Pastor, Lisandro Fernandez, Silvia Pacheco, Tatiana Semenova, Alejandra G. Becerra, Christian Y. Wicaksono, Eduardo R. Nouhra & Tatiana A. Semenova
The Yungas, a system of tropical and subtropical montane forests on the eastern slopes of the Andes, are extremely diverse and severely threatened by anthropogenic pressure and climate change. Previous mycological works focused on macrofungi (e.g., agarics, polypores) and mycorrhizae in Alnus acuminata forests, while fungal diversity in other parts of the Yungas has remained mostly unexplored. We carried out Ion Torrent sequencing of ITS2 rDNA from soil samples taken at 24 sites along the...

Data from: Fast adaptive responses in the oral jaw of Lake Victoria cichlids

Jacco C. Van Rijssel, Ellen S. Hoogwater, Mary A. Kishe-Machumu, Elize Van Reenen, Kevin V. Spits, Ronald C. Van Der Stelt, Jan H. Wanink & Frans Witte
Rapid morphological changes in response to fluctuating natural environments are a common phenomenon in species that undergo adaptive radiation. The dramatic ecological changes in Lake Victoria provide a unique opportunity to study environmental effects on cichlid morphology. This study shows how four haplochromine cichlids adapted their premaxilla to a changed diet over the past 30 years. Directly after the diet change toward larger and faster prey in the late 1980s, the premaxilla (upper jaw) changed...

Data from: Pupil-linked arousal determines variability in perceptual decision making

Peter R. Murphy, Joachim Vandekerckhove & Sander Nieuwenhuis
Decision making between several alternatives is thought to involve the gradual accumulation of evidence in favor of each available choice. This process is profoundly variable even for nominally identical stimuli, yet the neuro-cognitive substrates that determine the magnitude of this variability are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that arousal state is a powerful determinant of variability in perceptual decision making. We measured pupil size, a highly sensitive index of arousal, while human subjects performed a...

Registration Year

  • 2014
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Leiden University
    9
  • Naturalis Biodiversity Center
    4
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
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  • University of Würzburg
    1
  • Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute
    1
  • University of Patras
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • Fundación ProYungas
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  • University of Melbourne
    1