61 Works

Data from: Genetic erosion in wild populations makes resistance to a pathogen more costly

Emilien Luquet, Trenton W. J. Garner, Jean-Paul Léna, Christophe Bruel, Pierre Joly, Thierry Lengagne, Odile Grolet & Sandrine Plénet
Populations that have suffered from genetic erosion are expected to exhibit reduced average trait values or decreased variation in adaptive traits when experiencing periodic or emergent stressors such as infectious disease. Genetic erosion may consequentially modify the ability of a potential host population to cope with infectious disease emergence. We experimentally investigate this relationship between genetic variability and host response to exposure to an infectious agent both in terms of susceptibility to infection and indirect...

Unique and shared effects of local and catchment predictors over distribution of hyporheic organisms: does the valley rule the stream?

Samuel Mouron, David Eme, Arnaud Bellec, Mélanie Bertrand, Stefano Mammola, Fréderic Liébault, Christophe J. Douady & Florian Malard
This dataset describe the distribution of two hyporheic crustacean taxa (Bogidiellidae, Amphipoda and Anthuridae, Isopoda) in streams of New Caledonia. We sampled the two taxa at 228 sites. At each site, we quantified nine local predictors related to habitat area and stability, sediment metabolism and water origin, and eight catchment predictors related to geology, area, primary productivity, land use and specific discharge.

Maternally-transferred thyroid hormones and life-history variation in birds

Bin-Yan Hsu Hsu, Veli-Matti Pakanen, Winnie Boner, Blandine Doligez, Tapio Eeva, Ton Groothuis, Erkki Korpimäki, Toni Laaksonen, Asmoro Lelono, Pat Monaghan, Tom Sarraude, Robert Thomson, Jere Tolvanen, Barbara Tschirren, Rodrigo Vásquez & Suvi Ruuskanen
1. In vertebrates, thyroid hormones (THs) play an important role in the regulation of growth, development, metabolism, photoperiodic responses and migration. Maternally transferred THs are important for normal early-phase embryonic development when embryos are not able to produce endogenous THs. Previous studies have shown that variation in maternal THs within the physiological range can influence offspring phenotype. 2. Given the essential functions of maternal THs in development and metabolism, THs may be a mediator of...

A negative association between horn length and survival in a weakly dimorphic ungulate

Mathieu Douhard, Jean-Paul Crampe, Anne Loison & Christophe Bonenfant
While all models of sexual selection assume that the development and expression of enlarged secondary sexual traits are costly, males with larger ornaments or weapons generally show greater survival or longevity. These studies have mostly been performed in species with high sexual size dimorphism, subject to intense sexual selection. Here we examined the relationships between horn growth and several survival metrics in the weakly dimorphic Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica). In this unhunted population living at...

Origin of the species richness and composition of Caribbean aquatic entomofauna

Sylvain Dolédec & Chevelie Cineas
From a literature review, we constructed a database yielding comprising >1000 freshwater insect species (especially Odonata, Coleoptera, Trichoptera, Ephemeroptera; OCTE) in 26 Geographical Caribbean Units (GCU) and quantified local filtering (climate heterogeneity, annual rainfall, annual temperature), geography (area, distance from the mainland) and emergence age as a proxy for island ontogeny. We investigated the relative role of these variables on the species richness, endemism and composition of the units using island species-area relationship (ISAR), generalised...

Data from: When less is more and more is less: the impact of sampling effort on species delineation

Pauline Guenser, Samuel Ginot, Gilles Escarguel & Nicolas Goudemand
Taxonomy is the very first step of most biodiversity studies, but how confident can we be in the taxonomic-systematic exercise? One may hypothesise that the more material, the better the taxonomic delineation, because the more accurate the description of morphological variability. As rarefaction curves assess the degree of knowledge on taxonomic diversity through sampling effort, we aim to test the impact of sampling effort on species delineation by subsampling a given assemblage. To do so,...

Data from: Genetic structure in Orkney island mice: isolation promotes morphological diversification

Pascale Chevret, Lionel Hautier, Guila Ganem, Jeremy Herman, Sylvie Agret, Jean-Christophe Auffray & Sabrina Renaud
Following human occupation, the house mouse has colonized numerous islands, exposing the species to a wide variety of environments. Such a colonization process, involving successive founder events and bottlenecks, may either promote random evolution or facilitate adaptation, making the relative importance of adaptive and stochastic processes in insular evolution difficult to assess. Here, we jointly analyse genetic and morphometric variation in the house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) from the Orkney archipelago. Genetic analyses, based on...

Data from: Pollen limitation as a main driver of fruiting dynamics in oak populations

Éliane Schermer, Marie-Claude Bel-Venner, David Fouchet, Aurélie Siberchicot, Vincent Boulanger, Thomas Caignard, Michel Thibaudon, Gilles Oliver, Manuel Nicolas, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Sylvain Delzon & Samuel Venner
In many perennial wind-pollinated plants, the dynamics of seed production is commonly known to be highly fluctuating from year to year and synchronized among individuals within populations. The proximate causes of such seeding dynamics, called masting, are still poorly understood in oak species that are widespread in the northern hemisphere, and whose fruiting dynamics dramatically impacts forest regeneration and biodiversity. Combining long-term surveys of oak airborne pollen amount and acorn production over large-scale field networks...

Assessing the effects of artificial light at night on biodiversity across latitude – Current knowledge gaps

Jean Secondi, Aurélie Davranche, Marc Théry, Nathalie Mondy & Thierry Lengagne
Aim: Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a risk factor for organisms. Considering the spread and increasing intensity of night brightness across the globe, and the key role of light at all biological levels, alterations of ecosystems are expected. Yet, we cannot predict the severity of the effects of ALAN in several biomes because little information is available outside the temperate zone. We reviewed current knowledge and identified traits that could be targeted...

Supplementary Data - The Paris Biota decapod (Arthropoda) fauna and the diversity of Triassic decapods

Christopher Smith, Charbonnier Sylvain, James Jenks, Kevin Bylund, Gilles Escarguel, Nicolas Olivier, Emmanuel Fara & Arnaud Brayard
We describe here the early Spathian (Early Triassic) Paris Biota decapod fauna from the western USA basin. This fauna contains two taxa of Aegeridae (Dendobranchiata), namely Anisaeger longirostrus n. sp. and Aeger sp. that are the oldest known representatives of their family, thus extending its temporal range by 5 Myr back into the Early Triassic. This fauna also includes two representatives of Glypheida (Pleocyemata) with Litogaster turnbullensis Schram, 1971 and Pemphix krumenackeri n. sp., comforting...

Hierarchy of fear: experimentally testing ungulate reactions to lion, African wild dog and cheetah

Liana Zanette, Noa Rigoudy, Michael Clinchy, Mike Peel, Sarah Huebner & Craig Packer
Experiments have begun demonstrating that the fear (antipredator responses) large carnivores inspire in ungulates can shape ecosystem structure and function. Most such experiments have focused on the impacts of either just one large carnivore, or all as a whole, rather than the different impacts different large carnivores may have in intact multi-predator-prey systems. Experimentally testing the relative fearfulness ungulates demonstrate toward different large carnivores is a necessary first step in addressing these likely differing impacts....

Capture-recapture data with partially known birth date in four populations of yellow-bellied toads

Hugo Cayuela, Jean-François Lemaître, Eric Bonnaire, Julian Pichenot & Benedikt Schmidt
1. Patterns of actuarial senescence can be highly variable among species. Previous comparative analyses revealed that both age at the onset of senescence and rates of senescence are linked to species position along the fast-slow life-history continuum. As there are few long-term datasets of wild populations with known-age individuals, intraspecific (i.e. between-population) variation in senescence is understudied and limited to comparisons of wild and captive populations of the same species, mostly birds and mammals. 2....

Data from: Endosymbiont diversity in natural populations of Tetranychus mites is rapidly lost under laboratory conditions

Flore Zélé, Inês Santos, Margarida Matos, Mylène Weill, Fabrice Vavre & Sara Magalhães
Although the diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods is well documented, whether and how such diversity is maintained remains an open question. We investigated the temporal changes occurring in the prevalence and composition of endosymbionts after transferring natural populations of Tetranychus spider-mites from the field to the laboratory. These populations, belonging to three different Tetranychus species (T. urticae, T. ludeni and T. evansi) carried variable infection frequencies of Wolbachia, Cardinium, and Rickettsia. We report a...

Low oxygen levels can help to prevent the detrimental effect of acute warming on mitochondrial efficiency in fish

Elisa Thoral, Damien Roussel, Christos Chinopoulos, Loïc Teulier & Karine Salin
Aerobic metabolism of aquatic ectotherms is highly sensitive to fluctuating climates. Many mitochondrial traits exhibit phenotypic plasticity in response to acute variations in temperature and oxygen availability. These responses are critical for understanding the effects of environmental variations on aquatic ectotherms performance. Using the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, we determined the effects of acute warming and deoxygenation in vitro on mitochondrial respiratory capacities and mitochondrial efficiency to produce ATP (ATP/O ratio). We show that acute...

Changes in foraging mode caused by a decline in prey size have major bioenergetic consequences for a small pelagic fish

Elisa Thoral, Quentin Queiros, Damien Roussel, Gilbert Dutto, Eric Gasset, David McKenzie, Caroline Romestaing, Jean-Marc Fromentin, Claire Saraux & Loic Teulier
Global warming is causing profound modifications of aquatic ecosystems and one major outcome appears to be a decline in adult size of many fish species. Over the last decade, sardine populations in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean Sea) have shown severe declines in body size and condition as well as disappearance of the oldest individuals, which could not be related to overfishing, predation pressure, or epizootic diseases. In this study, we investigated whether this...

Data from: Natal dispersers pay a lifetime cost to increased reproductive effort in a wild bird population

Marion Germain, Tomas Pärt, Lars Gustafsson & Blandine Doligez
Natal dispersal is assumed to be costly. Such costs can be difficult to detect, and fitness consequences of dispersal are therefore poorly known. Because of lower phenotypic quality and/or familiarity with the environment, natal dispersers may be less buffered against a sudden increase in reproductive effort. Consequently, reproductive costs associated with natal dispersal may mostly be detected in harsh breeding conditions. We tested this prediction by comparing lifetime reproductive success between natal dispersers and non-dispersers...

Data from: Efficient exploration of the space of reconciled gene trees

Gergely J. Szöllősi, Wojciech Rosikiewicz, Bastien Boussau, Eric Tannier & Vincent Daubin
Gene trees record the combination of gene-level events, such as duplication, transfer and loss, and species-level events, such as speciation and extinction. Gene tree-species tree reconciliation methods model these processes by drawing gene trees into the species tree using a series of gene and species level events. The reconstruction of gene trees based on sequence alone almost always involves choosing between statistically equivalent or weakly distinguishable relationships that could be much better resolved based on...

The impact of paleoclimatic changes on body size evolution in marine fishes

Emily Troyer, Ricardo Betancur-R, Lily Hughes, Mark Westneat, Giorgio Carnevale, William White, John Pogonoski, James Tyler, Carole Baldwin, Guillermo Ortí, Julien Clavel, Dahiana Arcila & Andrew Brinkworth
Body size is an important species trait, correlating with lifespan, fecundity, and other ecological factors. Over Earth’s geological history, climate shifts have occurred, potentially shaping body size evolution in many clades. General rules attempting to summarize body size evolution include Bergmann’s rule, which states that species grow to larger sizes in cooler environments and smaller sizes in warmer environments; and Cope’s rule, which poses that lineages tend to increase in size over evolutionary time. Tetraodontiform...

Data from: Phenotypic divergence of the common toad (Bufo bufo) along an altitudinal gradient: evidence for local adaptation

Emilien Luquet, Jean-Paul Léna, Claude Miaud & Sandrine Plénet
Variation in the environment can induce different patterns of genetic and phenotypic differentiation among populations. Both neutral processes and selection can influence phenotypic differentiation. Altitudinal phenotypic variation is of particular interest in disentangling the interplay between neutral processes and selection in the dynamics of local adaptation processes but remains little explored. We conducted a common garden experiment to study the phenotypic divergence in larval life-history traits among nine populations of the common toad (Bufo bufo)...

Data from: The diversity of population responses to environmental change

Fernando Colchero, Owen R. Jones, Dalia A. Conde, Dave Hodgson, Felix Zajitschek, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Aurelio F. Malo, Susan C. Alberts, Peter H. Becker, Sandra Bouwhuis, Anne M. Bronikowski, Kristel M. De Vleeschouwer, Richard J. Delahay, Stefan Dummermuth, Eduardo Fernández-Duque, John Frisenvænge, Martin Hesselsøe, Sam Larson, Jean-Francois Lemaitre, Jennifer McDonald, David A.W. Miller, Colin O'Donnell, Craig Packer, Becky E. Raboy, Christopher J. Reading … & Chris J. Reading
The current extinction and climate change crises pressure us to predict population dynamics with ever-greater accuracy. Although predictions rest on the well-advanced theory of age-structured populations, two key issues remain poorly-explored. Specifically, how the age-dependency in demographic rates and the year-to-year interactions between survival and fecundity affect stochastic population growth rates. We use inference, simulations, and mathematical derivations to explore how environmental perturbations determine population growth rates for populations with different age-specific demographic rates and...

Data from: Plasticity of animal genome architecture unmasked by rapid evolution of a pelagic tunicate

France Denoeud, Simon Henriet, Sutada Mungpakdee, Jean-Marc Aury, Corinne Da Silva, Henner Brinkmann, Jana Mikhaleva, Lisbeth C. Olsen, Claire Jubin, Cristian Cañestro, Jean-Marie Bouquet, Gemma Danks, Julie Poulain, Coen Campsteijn, Marcin Adamski, Ismael Cross, Fekadu Yadetie, Matthieu Muffato, Alexandra Louis, Stephen Butcher, Georgia Tsagkogeorga, Anke Konrad, Sarabdeep Singh, Marit F. Jensen, Evelyne Huynh Cong … & Daniel Chourrout
Genomes of animals as different as sponges and humans show conservation of global architecture. Here we show that multiple genomic features including transposon diversity, developmental gene repertoire, physical gene order, and intron-exon organization are shattered in the tunicate Oikopleura, belonging to the sister group of vertebrates and retaining chordate morphology. Ancestral architecture of animal genomes can be deeply modified and may therefore be largely nonadaptive. This rapidly evolving animal lineage thus offers unique perspectives on...

Data from: A single multiplex of twelve microsatellite markers for the simultaneous study of the brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and the mountain hare (Lepus timidus)

Marie-Pauline Beugin, Jérôme Letty, Cécile Kaerle, Jean-Sébastien Guitton, Lina Muselet, Guillaume Queney & Dominique Pontier
The management of hunted species is challenging, as it must conciliate the conservation of species and their sustainable exploitation. Non-genetic tools are widely used in this context but they may present limitations notably when species can hybridize or when large-scale spatial monitoring is required to establish optimal management actions. This is why genetic tools have been more and more integrated in wildlife management practices. However, the markers proposed are often amplified in small multiplexes when...

Data from: The evolutionary conservation of the A Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase domain with Thrombospondin-1 motif metzincins across vertebrate species and their expression in teleost zebrafish

Frédéric G. Brunet, Fiona W. Fraser, Marley J. Binder, Adam D. Smith, Christopher Kintakas, Carolyn M. Dancevic, Alister C. Ward & Daniel R. McCulloch
Background: The A Disintegrin-like and Metalloproteinase domain with Thrombospondin-1 motifs (ADAMTS) enzymes comprise 19 mammalian zinc-dependent metalloproteinases (metzincins) with homologues in a wide range of invertebrates. ADAMTS enzymes have a broad range of functions in development and diseases due to their extracellular matrix remodelling activity. Here, we report a detailed characterisation of their evolutionary conservation across vertebrates. Results: Using bioinformatics complemented with de novo sequencing, gene sequences for ADAMTS enzymes were obtained from a variety...

Data from: Random heteropolymers preserve protein function in foreign environments

Brian Panganiban, Baofu Qiao, Tao Jiang, Christopher DelRe, Mona M. Obadia, Trung Dac Nguyen, Anton A. A. Smith, Aaron Hall, Izaac Sit, Marquise G. Crosby, Patrick B. Dennis, Eric Drockenmuller, Monica Olvera De La Cruz & Ting Xu
The successful incorporation of active proteins into synthetic polymers could lead to a new class of materials with functions found only in living systems. However, proteins rarely function under the conditions suitable for polymer processing. On the basis of an analysis of trends in protein sequences and characteristic chemical patterns on protein surfaces, we designed four-monomer random heteropolymers to mimic intrinsically disordered proteins for protein solubilization and stabilization in non-native environments. The heteropolymers, with optimized...

Data from: Deciphering the roles of environment and development in the evolution of a Late Triassic assemblage of conodont elements

Pauline Guenser, Louise Souquet, Sylvain Dolédec, Michele Mazza, Manuel Rigo & Nicolas Goudemand
To assess evolutionary processes in deep-time, it is essential to understand the roles of development and environment, both recorded through the morphological variability of fossil assemblages. Thanks to their great abundance and the high temporal resolution of their fossil record, conodont elements are ideal to address this issue. In this paper, we present the first quantitative study of a Carnian-Norian (late Triassic) assemblage of closely related P1 conodont elements. Using geometric morphometrics (landmarks, sliding-landmarks and...

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