50 Works

Data from: Genetic erosion in wild populations makes resistance to a pathogen more costly

Emilien Luquet, Trenton W. J. Garner, Jean-Paul Léna, Christophe Bruel, Pierre Joly, Thierry Lengagne, Odile Grolet & Sandrine Plénet
Populations that have suffered from genetic erosion are expected to exhibit reduced average trait values or decreased variation in adaptive traits when experiencing periodic or emergent stressors such as infectious disease. Genetic erosion may consequentially modify the ability of a potential host population to cope with infectious disease emergence. We experimentally investigate this relationship between genetic variability and host response to exposure to an infectious agent both in terms of susceptibility to infection and indirect...

A negative association between horn length and survival in a weakly dimorphic ungulate

Mathieu Douhard, Jean-Paul Crampe, Anne Loison & Christophe Bonenfant
While all models of sexual selection assume that the development and expression of enlarged secondary sexual traits are costly, males with larger ornaments or weapons generally show greater survival or longevity. These studies have mostly been performed in species with high sexual size dimorphism, subject to intense sexual selection. Here we examined the relationships between horn growth and several survival metrics in the weakly dimorphic Pyrenean chamois (Rupicapra pyrenaica). In this unhunted population living at...

Data from: Pollen limitation as a main driver of fruiting dynamics in oak populations

Éliane Schermer, Marie-Claude Bel-Venner, David Fouchet, Aurélie Siberchicot, Vincent Boulanger, Thomas Caignard, Michel Thibaudon, Gilles Oliver, Manuel Nicolas, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Sylvain Delzon & Samuel Venner
In many perennial wind-pollinated plants, the dynamics of seed production is commonly known to be highly fluctuating from year to year and synchronized among individuals within populations. The proximate causes of such seeding dynamics, called masting, are still poorly understood in oak species that are widespread in the northern hemisphere, and whose fruiting dynamics dramatically impacts forest regeneration and biodiversity. Combining long-term surveys of oak airborne pollen amount and acorn production over large-scale field networks...

Data from: Genetic structure in Orkney island mice: isolation promotes morphological diversification

Pascale Chevret, Lionel Hautier, Guila Ganem, Jeremy Herman, Sylvie Agret, Jean-Christophe Auffray & Sabrina Renaud
Following human occupation, the house mouse has colonized numerous islands, exposing the species to a wide variety of environments. Such a colonization process, involving successive founder events and bottlenecks, may either promote random evolution or facilitate adaptation, making the relative importance of adaptive and stochastic processes in insular evolution difficult to assess. Here, we jointly analyse genetic and morphometric variation in the house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) from the Orkney archipelago. Genetic analyses, based on...

Data from: Efficient exploration of the space of reconciled gene trees

Gergely J. Szöllősi, Wojciech Rosikiewicz, Bastien Boussau, Eric Tannier & Vincent Daubin
Gene trees record the combination of gene-level events, such as duplication, transfer and loss, and species-level events, such as speciation and extinction. Gene tree-species tree reconciliation methods model these processes by drawing gene trees into the species tree using a series of gene and species level events. The reconstruction of gene trees based on sequence alone almost always involves choosing between statistically equivalent or weakly distinguishable relationships that could be much better resolved based on...

Data from: Endosymbiont diversity in natural populations of Tetranychus mites is rapidly lost under laboratory conditions

Flore Zélé, Inês Santos, Margarida Matos, Mylène Weill, Fabrice Vavre & Sara Magalhães
Although the diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods is well documented, whether and how such diversity is maintained remains an open question. We investigated the temporal changes occurring in the prevalence and composition of endosymbionts after transferring natural populations of Tetranychus spider-mites from the field to the laboratory. These populations, belonging to three different Tetranychus species (T. urticae, T. ludeni and T. evansi) carried variable infection frequencies of Wolbachia, Cardinium, and Rickettsia. We report a...

Capture-recapture data with partially known birth date in four populations of yellow-bellied toads

Hugo Cayuela, Jean-François Lemaître, Eric Bonnaire, Julian Pichenot & Benedikt Schmidt
1. Patterns of actuarial senescence can be highly variable among species. Previous comparative analyses revealed that both age at the onset of senescence and rates of senescence are linked to species position along the fast-slow life-history continuum. As there are few long-term datasets of wild populations with known-age individuals, intraspecific (i.e. between-population) variation in senescence is understudied and limited to comparisons of wild and captive populations of the same species, mostly birds and mammals. 2....

Low oxygen levels can help to prevent the detrimental effect of acute warming on mitochondrial efficiency in fish

Elisa Thoral, Damien Roussel, Christos Chinopoulos, Loïc Teulier & Karine Salin
Aerobic metabolism of aquatic ectotherms is highly sensitive to fluctuating climates. Many mitochondrial traits exhibit phenotypic plasticity in response to acute variations in temperature and oxygen availability. These responses are critical for understanding the effects of environmental variations on aquatic ectotherms performance. Using the European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, we determined the effects of acute warming and deoxygenation in vitro on mitochondrial respiratory capacities and mitochondrial efficiency to produce ATP (ATP/O ratio). We show that acute...

Data from: Natal dispersers pay a lifetime cost to increased reproductive effort in a wild bird population

Marion Germain, Tomas Pärt, Lars Gustafsson & Blandine Doligez
Natal dispersal is assumed to be costly. Such costs can be difficult to detect, and fitness consequences of dispersal are therefore poorly known. Because of lower phenotypic quality and/or familiarity with the environment, natal dispersers may be less buffered against a sudden increase in reproductive effort. Consequently, reproductive costs associated with natal dispersal may mostly be detected in harsh breeding conditions. We tested this prediction by comparing lifetime reproductive success between natal dispersers and non-dispersers...

Changes in foraging mode caused by a decline in prey size have major bioenergetic consequences for a small pelagic fish

Elisa Thoral, Quentin Queiros, Damien Roussel, Gilbert Dutto, Eric Gasset, David McKenzie, Caroline Romestaing, Jean-Marc Fromentin, Claire Saraux & Loic Teulier
Global warming is causing profound modifications of aquatic ecosystems and one major outcome appears to be a decline in adult size of many fish species. Over the last decade, sardine populations in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean Sea) have shown severe declines in body size and condition as well as disappearance of the oldest individuals, which could not be related to overfishing, predation pressure, or epizootic diseases. In this study, we investigated whether this...

Assessing the effects of artificial light at night on biodiversity across latitude – Current knowledge gaps

Jean Secondi, Aurélie Davranche, Marc Théry, Nathalie Mondy & Thierry Lengagne
Aim: Exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) is a risk factor for organisms. Considering the spread and increasing intensity of night brightness across the globe, and the key role of light at all biological levels, alterations of ecosystems are expected. Yet, we cannot predict the severity of the effects of ALAN in several biomes because little information is available outside the temperate zone. We reviewed current knowledge and identified traits that could be targeted...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in the Mediterranean Biodiversity Hotspot affects barcoding accuracy of its freshwater fishes

Matthias F. Geiger, Fabian Herder, Michael T. Monaghan, Vitor Almada, Roberta Barbieri, Michel Bariche, Patrick Berrebi, Jörg Bohlen, Miriam Casal-Lopez, Gaël P. J. Denys, Agnès Dettai, Ignacio Doadrio, Elena Kalogianni, Heiko Kärst, Maurice Kottelat, Marcelo Kovačić, Martin Laporte, Massimo Lorenzoni, Zoran Marčić, Müfit Özuluğ, Anabel Perdices, Silvia Perea, Henri Persat, Stefano Porcellotti, Cesare Puzzi … & G. B. Delmastro
Incomplete knowledge of biodiversity remains a stumbling block for conservation planning, and even occurs within globally important Biodiversity Hotspots. Although technical advances have boosted the power of molecular biodiversity assessments, the link between DNA sequences and species and the analytics to discriminate entities, remain crucial. Here, we present an analysis of the first DNA barcode library for the freshwater fish fauna of the Mediterranean Biodiversity Hotspot (526 spp.), with virtually complete species coverage (498 spp.,...

Data from: Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists

Annegret Kohler, Alan Kuo, Laszlo G. Nagy, Emmanuelle Morin, Kerrie W. Barry, Francois Buscot, Bjorn Canback, Cindy Choi, Nicolas Cichocki, Alicia Clum, Jan Colpaert, Alex Copeland, Mauricio D. Costa, Jeanne Dore, Dimitrios Floudas, Gilles Gay, Mariangela Girlanda, Bernard Henrissat, Sylvie Herrmann, Jaqueline Hess, Nils Hogberg, Tomas Johansson, Hassine-Radhouane Khouja, Kurt LaButti, Urs Lahrmann … & Francis Martin
To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall–degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose....

Data from: δ18O-derived incubation temperatures of oviraptorosaur eggs

Romain Amiot, Xu Wang, Shuo Wang, Christophe Lécuyer, Jean-Michel Mazin, Jinyou Mo, Jean-Pierre Flandrois, François Fourel, Xiaolin Wang, Xing Xu, Zhijun Zhang & Zhonghe Zhou
In order to determine the incubation temperature of eggs laid by non-avian dinosaurs, we analysed the oxygen isotope compositions of both eggshell carbonate (δ18Oc) and embryo bone phosphate (δ18Op) from seven oviraptorosaur eggs with preserved in ovo embryo bones. These eggs come from the Upper Cretaceous Nanxiong Formation of Jiangxi Province, China. Oviraptorosaur theropods were selected because of their known brooding behaviour as evidenced by preserved adult specimens fossilized in brooding posture on their clutch....

Data from: A new method for estimating locomotion type in large ground birds

Delphine Angst, Eric Buffetaut, Christophe Lecuyer & Romain Amiot
Estimating the locomotion type of fossil ground birds is necessary for a better understanding of their ecology. Until now, only one method has allowed us to estimate the locomotion of fossil ground birds, but its application is complicated in the majority of fossil cases because it requires data from the three bones from the same hindlimb of one individual. Here, we propose a new method using only the maximum length and minimum width of the...

Data from: Food supplementation mitigates dispersal-dependent differences in nest defence in a passerine bird.

Charlotte Récapet, Grégory Daniel, Joëlle Taroni, Pierre Bize & Blandine Doligez
Dispersing and non-dispersing individuals often differ in phenotypic traits (e.g. physiology, behaviour), but to what extent these differences are fixed or driven by external conditions remains elusive. We experimentally tested whether differences in nest-defence behaviour between dispersing and non-dispersing individuals changed with local habitat quality in collared flycatchers, by providing additional food during the nestling rearing period. In control (non-food-supplemented) nests, dispersers were less prone to defend their brood compared with non-dispersers, whereas in food-supplemented...

Data from: Introduction history overrides social factors in explaining genetic structure of females in Mediterranean mouflon

Elodie Portanier, Mathieu Garel, Sebastien Devillard, Pascal Marchand, Julie Andru, Daniel Maillard & Gilles Bourgoin
Fine-scale spatial genetic structure of populations results from social and spatial behaviors of individuals such as sex-biased dispersal and philopatry. However, the demographic history of a given population can override such socio-spatial factors in shaping genetic variability when bottlenecks or founder events occurred in the population. Here, we investigated whether socio-spatial organization determines the fine-scale genetic structure for both sexes in a Mediterranean mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon×Ovis sp.) population in southern France 60 years after...

Data from: Fluctuating food resources influence developmental plasticity in wild boar

Marlène Gamelon, Mathieu Douhard, Eric Baubet, Olivier Gimenez, Serge Brandt, Jean-Michel Gaillard & J.-M. Gaillard
To maximize long-term average reproductive success, individuals can diversify the phenotypes of offspring produced within a reproductive event by displaying the ‘coin-flipping’ tactic. Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) females have been reported to adopt this tactic. However, whether the magnitude of developmental plasticity within a litter depends on stochasticity in food resources has not been yet investigated. From long-term monitoring, we found that juvenile females produced similar-sized fetuses within a litter independent of food availability....

Data from: Recovery of benthic marine communities from the end-Permian mass extinction at the low-latitudes of Eastern Panthalassa

Richard Hofmann, Michael Hautmann, Arnaud Brayard, Alexander Nützel, Kevin Bylund, James Jenks, Emmanuelle Vennin, Nicolas Olivier & Hugo Bucher
Based on the quantitative community analysis using species-level identifications, we track the restoration of benthic ecosystems after the end-Permian mass extinction throughout the Lower Triassic of the western USA. New data on the palaeoecology of the Thaynes Group and Sinbad Formation are provided, which fill a gap between the recently studied palaeoecology of the Griesbachian–Dienerian Dinwoody Formation and the Spathian Virgin Formation. In the Sinbad Formation and Thaynes Group, 17 species (12 genera) of bivalves,...

Data from: Linking genetic diversity and temporal fluctuations in population abundance of the introduced feral cat (Felis silvestris catus) on the Kerguelen Archipelago.

Sébastien Devillard, Hugues Santin-Janin, Ludovic Say & Dominique Pontier
Linking temporal variations of genetic diversity, including allelic richness and heterozygosity, and spatio-temporal fluctuations in population abundance has emerged as an important tool for understanding demographic and evolutionary processes in natural populations. This so-called ‘genetic monitoring’ was conducted across 12 consecutive years (1996-2007) at three sites for the feral cat, introduced onto the Kerguelen Archipelago fifty years ago. Temporal changes in allelic richness and heterozygosity at 18 microsatellite DNA loci were compared to temporal changes...

Data from: Evolution of the ARF gene family in land plants: old domains, new tricks

Cédric Finet, Annick Berne-Dedieu, Charles P. Scutt & Ferdinand Marlétaz
Auxin Response Factors (ARF) are key players in plant development. They mediate the cellular response to the plant hormone auxin by activating or repressing the expression of downstream developmental genes. The pivotal activation function of ARF proteins is enabled by their four-domain architecture, which includes both DNA-binding and protein dimerization motifs. To determine the evolutionary origin of this characteristic architecture, we built a comprehensive dataset of 224 ARF-related protein sequences that represents all major living...

Genotypes of Italian free-ranging dogs

Eugenia Natoli, Roberto Bonnani, Simona Cafazzo, Daniel Mills, Dominique Pontier & Malgorzata Pilot
Domestication has greatly changed the social and reproductive behavior of dogs relative to that of wild members of the genus Canis, which typically exhibit social monogamy and extended parental care. Unlike a typical grey wolf pack that consists of a single breeding pair and their offspring from multiple seasons, a group of free-ranging dogs (FRDs) can include multiple breeding individuals of both sexes. To understand the consequences of this shift in reproductive behavior, we reconstructed...

Artificial light at night alters activity, body mass and corticosterone level in a tropical anuran

Jean Secondi, Nathalie Mondy, Jérôme M.W. Gippet, Morgane Touzot, Vanessa Gardette, Ludovic Guillard & Thierry Lengagne
Photoperiod is a major factor regulating biological rhythms in animals and plants. At low latitudes, annual variation in daylength is low and species are expected to strongly rely on photic cues to reset their circadian clocks. A corollary is that individuals should be strongly affected by sudden changes in the photic regime as those generated by artificial light at night (ALAN). We tested this hypothesis in an anuran in Costa Rica (10°N). Using an outdoor...

Data on paternal age and sperm production of the progeny

Gabriele Sorci, Pauline Vuarin, Loïc Lesobre, Gwènaëlle Levêque, Michel Saint Jalme, Frédéric Lacroix & Yves Hingrat
Parental age has profound consequences for offspring’s phenotype. However, whether patrilineal age affects offspring sperm production is unknown, despite the importance of sperm production for male reproductive success in species facing post-copulatory sexual selection. Using a longitudinal dataset on ejaculate attributes of the houbara bustard, we showed that offspring sired by old fathers had different age-dependent trajectories of sperm production compared to offspring sired by young fathers. Specifically, they produced less sperm (-48%) in their...

Dataset and script to: Morphometric variance, evolutionary constraints and their change through time in Late Devonian Palmatolepis conodonts

Sabrina Renaud, Catherine Girard & Anne-Béatrice Dufour
Phenotypic variation is the raw material of evolution. Standing variation can facilitate response to selection along “lines of least evolutionary resistance”, but selection itself might alter the structure of the variance. Shape was quantified using 2D geometric morphometrics in Palmatolepis conodonts through the Late Devonian period. Patterns of variance were characterized along the record by the variance-covariance matrix (P-matrix) and its first axis (Pmax). The Late Frasnian was marked by environmental oscillations culminating with the...

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