87 Works

Data from: An association between differential expression and genetic divergence in the Patagonian olive mouse (Abrothrix olivacea)

Facundo M. Giorello, Matias Feijoo, Guillermo D'Elía, Daniel E. Naya, Lourdes Valdez, Juan C. Opazo & Enrique P. Lessa
Recent molecular studies have found striking differences between desert-adapted species and model mammals regarding water conservation. In particular, aquaporin 4, a classical gene involved in water regulation of model species, is absent or not expressed in the kidneys of desert-adapted species. To further understand the molecular response to water availability we studied the Patagonian olive mouse Abrothrix olivacea, a species with an unusually broad ecological tolerance that exhibits a great urine concentration capability. The species...

Data from: Conflicting evolutionary patterns due to mitochondrial introgression and multilocus phylogeography of the Patagonian freshwater crab Aegla neuquensis

Brian R. Barber, Jiawu Xu, Marcos Pérez-Losada, Carlos G. Jara & Keith A. Crandall
BACKGROUND: Multiple loci and population genetic methods were employed to study the phylogeographic history of the Patagonian freshwater crab Aegla neuquensis (Aeglidae: Decopoda). This taxon occurs in two large river systems in the Patagonian Steppe, from the foothills of the Andes Mountains east to the Atlantic Ocean. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nuclear phylogeny and multilocus nested clade phylogeographic analysis detected a fragmentation event between the Negro and Chico-Chubut river systems. This event occurred approximately 137 thousand...

Data from: Differences in endophyte communities of introduced trees depend on the phylogenetic relatedness of the receiving forest

Michael J. Gundale, Juan P. Almeida, Håkan Wallander, David A. Wardle, Paul Kardol, Marie-Charlotte Nilsson Hegethorn, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Duane A. Peltzer, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Bill Mason, Nicholas Rosenstock & Marie-Charlotte Nilsson
Plant species sometimes perform extraordinarily well when introduced to new environments, through achieving higher growth rates, individual biomasses or higher densities in their receiving communities compared to their native range communities. One hypothesis proposed to explain enhanced performance in species’ new environments is that their soil microbial communities may be different and provide greater benefit than microbial communities encountered in species’ native environments. However, detailed descriptions of soil biota associated with species in both their...

Data from: Widespread hybridization and bidirectional introgression in sympatric species of coral reef fish

Hugo B. Harrison, Michael L. Berumen, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Eva Salas, David H. Williamson & Geoffrey P. Jones
Coral reefs are highly diverse ecosystems, where numerous closely related species often coexist. How new species arise and are maintained in these high geneflow environments have been long-standing conundrums. Hybridization and patterns of introgression between sympatric species provide a unique insight into the mechanisms of speciation and the maintenance of species boundaries. In this study, we investigate the extent of hybridization between two closely related species of coral reef fish: the common coral trout (Plectropomus...

Data from: Local persistence of Mann’s soft-haired mouse Abrothrix manni (Rodentia, Sigmodontinae) during Quaternary glaciations in southern Chile

Lourdes Valdez & Guillermo D'Elía
Quaternary climatic oscillations have impacted Patagonian sigmodontine fauna, leaving traceable genetic footprints. In southern Chile, changes in the landscape included transitions to different vegetation formations as well as the extension of ice sheets. In this study, we focus on the Valdivian forest endemic and recently described sigmodontine species Abrothrix manni. We aim to assess the genetic structure of this species, testing for the existence of intraspecific lineages, and inferring the recent demographic history of the...

Data from: Using a butterflyfish genome as a general tool for RAD-Seq studies in specialized reef fish

Joseph D. DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek J. Piatek, Xin Wang, Manuel Aranda & Michael L. Berumen
Data from a large-scale restriction site associated DNA (RAD-Seq) study of nine butterflyfish species in the Red Sea and Arabian Sea provided a means to test the utility of a recently published draft genome (Chaetodon austriacus) and assess apparent bias in this method of isolating nuclear loci. We here processed double-digest restriction-site (ddRAD) associated DNA sequencing data to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and their associated function with and without our reference genome to...

Data from: Exploring seascape genetics and kinship in the reef sponge Stylissa carteri in the Red Sea

Emily C. Giles, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Nigel E. Hussey, Timothy Ravasi & Michael L. Berumen
A main goal of population geneticists is to study patterns of gene flow to gain a better understanding of the population structure in a given organism. To date most efforts have been focused on studying gene flow at either broad scales to identify barriers to gene flow and isolation by distance or at fine spatial scales in order to gain inferences regarding reproduction and local dispersal. Few studies have measured connectivity at multiple spatial scales...

Data from: Blue whale population structure along the eastern South Pacific Ocean: evidence of more than one population

Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Rick LeDuc, Aimee Lang, Barbara Taylor, Lida E. Pimper, Luis Bedriñana-Romano, Howard C. Rosenbaum & Christian C. Figueroa
Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were among the most intensively exploited species of whales in the world. As a consequence of this intense exploitation, blue whale sightings off the coast of Chile were uncommon by the end of the 20th century. In 2004, a feeding and nursing ground was reported in southern Chile (SCh). With the aim to investigate the genetic identity and relationship of these Chilean blue whales to those in other Southern Hemisphere areas,...

Data from: Genetic signals of artificial and natural dispersal linked to colonization of South America by non-native Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Daniel Gomez-Uchida, Diego Cañas-Rojas, Carla M. Riva-Rossi, Javier E. Ciancio, Miguel A. Pascual, Billy Ernst, Eduardo Aedo, Selim S. Musleh, Francisca Valenzuela-Aguayo, Thomas P. Quinn, James E. Seeb & Lisa W. Seeb
Genetics data have provided unprecedented insights into evolutionary aspects of colonization by non-native populations. Yet, our understanding of how artificial (human-mediated) and natural dispersal pathways of non-native individuals influence genetic metrics, evolution of genetic structure, and admixture remains elusive. We capitalize on the widespread colonization of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in South America, mediated by both dispersal pathways, to address these issues using data from a panel of polymorphic SNPs. First, genetic diversity and the...

Data from: Energy expenditure and body size are targets of natural selection across a wide geographic range, in a terrestrial invertebrate

José Luis Bartheld, Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia, Paulina Artacho, Cristian Salgado-Luarte, Ernesto Gianoli & Roberto F. Nespolo
One of the central questions in evolutionary ecology is how different functional capacities impact fitness, and how it varies across populations. For instance, do phenotypic attributes influence fitness similarly across geographic gradients? Which traits (physiological, morphological, life history) are most likely to be targets of natural selection? Do particular combinations of traits maximize fitness? In a semi-natural experiment, we analyzed introduced populations of an invasive species, the garden snail (Cornu aspersum) in Chile, which show...

Data from: Genetic variation in blue whales in the eastern Pacific: implication for taxonomy and use of common wintering grounds

Richard G. LeDuc, F.I. Archer, Aimee R. Lang, Karen K. Martien, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Koen Van Waerebeek, Robert L. Brownell, Barbara L. Taylor & F. I. Archer
Many aspects of blue whale biology are poorly understood. Some of the gaps in our knowledge, such as those regarding their basic taxonomy and seasonal movements, directly affect our ability to monitor and manage blue whale populations. As a step towards filling in some of these gaps, microsatellite and mtDNA sequence analyses were conducted on blue whale samples from the Southern Hemisphere, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), and the northeast Pacific. The results indicate that...

Data from: Larval dispersal and fishing pressure influence recruitment in a coral reef fishery

Richard J. Hamilton, Diego Lozano-Cortés, Michael Bode, Glenn Almany, Hugo B. Harrison, John Pita, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Colin Gereniu, Nate Peterson, Howard Choat, Peter A. Waldie & Michael L. Berumen
Understanding larval connectivity patterns in exploited fishes is a fundamental prerequisite for developing effective management strategies and assessing the vulnerability of a fishery to recruitment overfishing and localised extinction. To date however, researchers have not considered how regional variations in fishing pressure also influence recruitment. We used genetic parentage analyses and modelling to infer the dispersal patterns of bumphead parrotfish (Bolbometopon muricatum) larvae in the Kia fishing grounds, Isabel Province, Solomon Islands. We then extrapolated...

Supplementary material: Ultraconserved elements improve the resolution of difficult nodes within the rapid radiation of neotropical sigmodontine rodents (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae)

Andrés Parada, Guillermo D'Elía & John Hanson
Sigmodontine rodents (Cricetidae, Sigmodontinae) represent the second largest muroid subfamily and the most species-rich group of New World mammals, encompassing above 410 living species and ca. 87 genera. Even with advances on the clarification of sigmodontine phylogenetic relationships that have been made recently, the phylogenetic relationships among the 11 main group of genera (i.e., tribes) remain poorly resolved, in particular among those forming the large clade Oryzomyalia. This pattern has been interpreted as consequence of...

Stability of rocky intertidal communities in response to species removal varies across spatial scales

Nelson Valdivia, Daniela Lopez, Eliseo Fica, Alexis Catalán, Moisés Aguilera, Marjorie Araya, Claudia Betancourtt, Katherine Burgos-Andrade, Thais Carvajal-Baldeon, Valentina Escares, Simon Gartenstein, Mariana Grossmann, Bárbara Gutiérrez, Jonne Kotta, Diego Morales-Torres, Bárbara Riedemann-Saldivia, Sara Rodríguez, Catalina Velasco-Charpentier, Vicente Villalobos & Bernardo Broitman
Improving our understanding of stability across spatial scales is crucial in the current scenario of biodiversity loss. Still, most empirical studies of stability target small scales. Here we experimentally removed the local space-dominant species (macroalgae, barnacles, or mussels) at eight sites spanning more than 1000 km of coastline in north- and south-central Chile, and quantified the relationship between area (the number of aggregated sites) and stability in aggregate community variables (total cover) and taxonomic composition....

Evaluating aspects of biodiversity loss, and associated indicators, for application to the assessment of the impacts of agricultural commodity trade

Amy Molotoks, América Paz Durán, Jonathan Green & Christopher David West
This output has been funded in whole or part by the UK Research and Innovation’s Global Challenges Research Fund under the Trade, Development and the Environment Hub project (project number ES/S008160/1).

Data from: The interplay among intraspecific leaf trait variation, niche breadth and species abundance along light and soil nutrient gradients

Alex Fajardo & Andrew Siefert
It is assumed that widespread, generalist species have high phenotypic variation, but we know little about how intraspecific trait variation (ITV) relates to species abundance and niche breadth. In the temperate rainforest of southern Chile, we hypothesized that species with wide niche breadth would exhibit 1) high among-plot ITV, 2) a strong relationship between trait values and the environment, and 3) a close fit between traits and local environment trait optima. We measured leaf functional...

Data from: Quantification of correlational selection on thermal physiology, thermoregulatory behavior and energy metabolism in lizards

Paulina Artacho, Julia Saravia, Beatriz Decencière Ferrandière, Samuel Perret & Jean-François Le Galliard
Phenotypic selection is widely accepted as the primary cause of adaptive evolution in natural populations, but selection on complex functional properties linking physiology, behavior, and morphology has been rarely quantified. In ectotherms, correlational selection on thermal physiology, thermoregulatory behavior, and energy metabolism is of special interest because of their potential coadaptation. We quantified phenotypic selection on thermal sensitivity of locomotor performance (sprint speed), thermal preferences, and resting metabolic rate in captive populations of an ectothermic...

Data from: Asymmetric competitive effects during species range expansion: an experimental assessment of interaction strength between ‘equivalent’ grazer species at their range overlap

Moises A. Aguilera, Nelson Valdivia, Stuart Jenkins, Sergio A. Navarrete & Bernardo Broitman
1. Biotic interactions are central to the development of theory and concepts in community ecology; experimental evidence has shown their strong effects on patterns of population and community organization and dynamics over local spatial scales. The role of competition in determining range limits and preventing invasions at biogeographic scales is more controversial, partly because of the complexity of processes involved in species colonization of novel habitats and the difficulties in performing appropriate manipulations and controls....

Data from: Revisiting the relative growth rate hypothesis for gymnosperm and angiosperm species co‐occurrence

Frida I. Piper, Guenter Hoch & Alex Fajardo
Premise of the study: It is unclear to what extent the co-occurrence of angiosperm and gymnosperm species in some marginal ecosystems is explained by reduced growth in angiosperms due to carbon (C) limitation, and by high stress tolerance in gymnosperms associated with lack of vessels and resource conservation. Methods: We examined growth patterns and traits associated with C balance in four evergreen angiosperm species (including one vesselless species, Drimys winteri) and three gymnosperm tree species...

Data from: Masculinized females produce heavier offspring in a group living rodent

Loreto Alejandra Correa, Cecilia León, Juan Ramírez-Estrada, Mauricio Soto-Gamboa, Roger Dani Sepúlveda & Luis Alberto Ebensperger
Alternative morphotypes have been reported less frequently in females than in males. An exception to this rule is the gradient of phenotypical masculinization reported in some female mammals, in which feminized and masculinized females represent two opposite ends along this gradient. These phenotypical differences originate during prenatal development as the consequence of maternal effects. Feminized and masculinized females differ in several traits, including morphological, physiological, behavioural and reproductive traits. Differences previously reported in reproductive traits...

Data from: Tracing the trans-Pacific evolutionary history of a domesticated seaweed (Gracilaria chilensis) with archaeological and genetic data

Marie-Laure Guillemin, Myriam Valero, Sylvain Faugeron, Wendy Nelson & Christophe Destombe
The history of a domesticated marine macroalga is studied using archaeological, phylogeographic and population genetic tools. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses demonstrated that the cultivated red alga Gracilaria chilensis colonised the Chilean coast from New Zealand. Combining archaeological observations with phylogeographic data provided evidence that exchanges between New Zealand and Chile have occurred at least before the Holocene, likely at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and we suggest that migration probably occurred...

Data from: Identifying management actions to increase foraging opportunities for shorebirds at semi-intensive shrimp farms

Juan G. Navedo, Guillermo Fernández, Nelson Valdivia, Mark C. Drever & Jose A. Masero
The expansion of aquaculture has resulted in widespread habitat conversion throughout the world. Identifying beneficial management measures may dramatically reduce negative impacts of aquaculture for migratory birds. We studied how densities of foraging shorebirds varied at ponds within a semi-intensive shrimp aquaculture farm on the north-western coast of Mexico, as related to timing of harvest and tidal cycles. Further, we estimated the total daily available area for each shorebird species throughout two entire harvesting seasons...

A practical approach to measuring the biodiversity impacts of land conversion

América P. Durán, Jonathan M. H. Green, Christopher D. West, Piero Visconti, Neil Burgess, Malika Virah-Sawmy & Andrew Balmford
1. Further progress in reducing biodiversity loss relies on the improved quantification of the connections between drivers of habitat loss and subsequent biodiversity impacts. To this end, biodiversity impact metrics should be able to report linked trends in specific human activities and changes in biodiversity state, accounting for both the ecology of different species, and the cumulative effects of historical habitat losses. These characteristics are not currently captured within a single metric. 2. Here we...

Why bears hibernate? Redefining the scaling energetics of hibernation

Roberto Nespolo
Hibernation is a natural state of suspended animation that many mammals experience and has been interpreted as an adaptive strategy for saving energy. However, the actual amount of savings that hibernation represents, and particularly its dependence on body mass (the “scaling”) has not been calculated properly. Here we estimated the scaling of daily energy expenditure of hibernation (DEEH), covering a range of five orders of magnitude in mass. We found that DEEH scales isometrically with...

Data from: Heat tolerance in Drosophila subobscura along a latitudinal gradient: contrasting patterns between plastic and genetic responses

Luis E. Castañeda, Enrico L. Rezende & Mauro Santos
Susceptibility to global warming relies on how thermal tolerances respond to increasing temperatures through plasticity or evolution. Climatic adaptation can be assessed examining the geographic variation in thermal-related traits. We studied latitudinal patterns in heat tolerance in Drosophila subobscura reared at two temperatures. We used four static stressful temperatures to estimate the thermal death time curves (TDT), and two ramping assays with fast and slow heating rates. TDT curves allow estimating the critical thermal maximum...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    9
  • 2021
    8
  • 2020
    13
  • 2019
    6
  • 2018
    11
  • 2017
    12
  • 2016
    11
  • 2015
    10
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    85
  • Other
    1
  • Report
    1

Affiliations

  • University Austral de Chile
    75
  • Austral University of Chile
    17
  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    11
  • Pontifical Catholic University of Chile
    9
  • University of Washington
    4
  • University of Extremadura
    4
  • Curtin University
    4
  • University of Concepción
    4
  • James Cook University
    4
  • Sorbonne University
    3