11 Works

Data from: Differences in endophyte communities of introduced trees depend on the phylogenetic relatedness of the receiving forest

Michael J. Gundale, Juan P. Almeida, Håkan Wallander, David A. Wardle, Paul Kardol, Marie-Charlotte Nilsson Hegethorn, Alex Fajardo, Anibal Pauchard, Duane A. Peltzer, Seppo Ruotsalainen, Bill Mason, Nicholas Rosenstock & Marie-Charlotte Nilsson
Plant species sometimes perform extraordinarily well when introduced to new environments, through achieving higher growth rates, individual biomasses or higher densities in their receiving communities compared to their native range communities. One hypothesis proposed to explain enhanced performance in species’ new environments is that their soil microbial communities may be different and provide greater benefit than microbial communities encountered in species’ native environments. However, detailed descriptions of soil biota associated with species in both their...

Data from: Genetic variation in blue whales in the eastern Pacific: implication for taxonomy and use of common wintering grounds

Richard G. LeDuc, F.I. Archer, Aimee R. Lang, Karen K. Martien, Brittany Hancock-Hanser, Juan P. Torres-Florez, Rodrigo Hucke-Gaete, Howard C. Rosenbaum, Koen Van Waerebeek, Robert L. Brownell, Barbara L. Taylor & F. I. Archer
Many aspects of blue whale biology are poorly understood. Some of the gaps in our knowledge, such as those regarding their basic taxonomy and seasonal movements, directly affect our ability to monitor and manage blue whale populations. As a step towards filling in some of these gaps, microsatellite and mtDNA sequence analyses were conducted on blue whale samples from the Southern Hemisphere, the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP), and the northeast Pacific. The results indicate that...

Data from: Masculinized females produce heavier offspring in a group living rodent

Loreto Alejandra Correa, Cecilia León, Juan Ramírez-Estrada, Mauricio Soto-Gamboa, Roger Dani Sepúlveda & Luis Alberto Ebensperger
Alternative morphotypes have been reported less frequently in females than in males. An exception to this rule is the gradient of phenotypical masculinization reported in some female mammals, in which feminized and masculinized females represent two opposite ends along this gradient. These phenotypical differences originate during prenatal development as the consequence of maternal effects. Feminized and masculinized females differ in several traits, including morphological, physiological, behavioural and reproductive traits. Differences previously reported in reproductive traits...

Data from: Identifying management actions to increase foraging opportunities for shorebirds at semi-intensive shrimp farms

Juan G. Navedo, Guillermo Fernández, Nelson Valdivia, Mark C. Drever & Jose A. Masero
The expansion of aquaculture has resulted in widespread habitat conversion throughout the world. Identifying beneficial management measures may dramatically reduce negative impacts of aquaculture for migratory birds. We studied how densities of foraging shorebirds varied at ponds within a semi-intensive shrimp aquaculture farm on the north-western coast of Mexico, as related to timing of harvest and tidal cycles. Further, we estimated the total daily available area for each shorebird species throughout two entire harvesting seasons...

Data from: Physiological plasticity and local adaptation to elevated pCO2 in calcareous algae: an ontogenetic and geographic approach

Jacqueline L. Padilla-Gamiño, Juan D. Gaitán-Espitia, Morgan W. Kelly & Gretchen E. Hofmann
To project how ocean acidification will impact biological communities in the future, it is critical to understand the potential for local adaptation and the physiological plasticity of marine organisms throughout their entire life cycle, as some stages may be more vulnerable than others. Coralline algae are ecosystem engineers that play significant functional roles in oceans worldwide, and are considered vulnerable to ocean acidification. Using different stages of coralline algae, we tested the hypothesis that populations...

Data from: Introduced Drosophila subobscura populations perform better than native populations during an oviposition choice task due to increased fecundity but similar learning ability

Julien Foucaud, Céline Moreno, Marta Pascual, Enrico L. Rezende, Luis E. Castañeda, Patricia Gibert & Frederic Mery
The success of invasive species is tightly linked to their fitness in a putatively novel environment. While quantitative components of fitness have been studied extensively in the context of invasive species, fewer studies have looked at qualitative components of fitness, such as behavioral plasticity, and their interaction with quantitative components, despite intuitive benefits over the course of an invasion. In particular, learning is a form of behavioral plasticity that makes it possible to finely tune...

Data from: A phylogenetic analysis of macroevolutionary patterns in fermentative yeasts

Rocío Paleo-López, Julian Fernando Quintero-Galvis, Jaiber J. Solano-Iguaran, Angela M. Sanchez-Salazar, Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia, Roberto F. Nespolo & Juan D. Gaitan-Espitia
When novel sources of ecological opportunity are available, physiological innovations can trigger adaptive radiations. This could be the case of yeasts (Saccharomycotina), in which an evolutionary novelty is represented by the capacity to exploit simple sugars from fruits (fermentation). During adaptive radiations, diversification and morphological evolution are predicted to slow-down after early bursts of diversification. Here, we performed the first comparative phylogenetic analysis in yeasts, testing the “early burst” prediction on species diversification and also...

Data from: An assessment of carbon and nutrient limitations in the formation of the southern Andes treeline

Alex Fajardo & Frida I. Piper
Although the principal mechanism determining tree line formation appears to be carbon (C)-sink limitations due to low temperatures, few studies have assessed the complementary role of reduced soil nutrient availability with elevation. We tested the hypothesis that nutrient (especially nitrogen, N) limitations at tree line may directly (via C-source) or indirectly (via C-sink) reduce the growth of a winter deciduous tree line species. If a shortage of soil N with elevation is involved in tree...

Data from: Wind exposure and light exposure, more than elevation-related temperature, limit tree line seedling abundance on three continents

Eliot J. B. McIntire, Frida I. Piper & Alex Fajardo
The transition from seedlings into trees at alpine treelines is a temperature-limited process that ultimately sets the treeline elevation at a global scale. As such, treelines may be key bioassays of global warming effects on species distributions. For global warming to promote upward treeline migration, as predicted, seedlings must be available. We examined, for the first time at a global scale, elevational patterns and drivers of seedling availability at treelines. Working at 10 sites across...

Data from: Large-scale, multi-directional larval connectivity among coral reef fish populations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

David H. Williamson, Hugo B. Harrison, Glenn R. Almany, Michael L. Berumen, Michael Bode, Mary C. Bonin, Severine Choukroun, Peter J. Doherty, Ashley J. Frisch, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo & Geoffrey P. Jones
Larval dispersal is the key process by which populations of most marine fishes and invertebrates are connected and replenished. Advances in larval tagging and genetics have enhanced our capacity to track larval dispersal, assess scales of population connectivity, and quantify larval exchange among no-take marine reserves and fished areas. Recent studies have found that reserves can be a significant source of recruits for populations up to 40 km away, but the scale and direction of...

Data from: Mediterranean and temperate treelines are controlled by different environmental drivers

Frida I. Piper, Benjamín Viñegla, Juan Carlos Linares, Jesús Julio Camarero, Lohengrin A. Cavieres & Alex Fajardo
The growth limitation hypothesis (GLH) is the most accepted explanation for treeline formation, but it has been scarcely examined in Mediterranean treelines, which are located at lower elevations than temperate treelines. The GLH states that low temperature is the ultimate environmental driver for treeline formation, constraining C-sinks (i.e. tissue formation) more than C-sources. The GLH predicts similar or increasing (but not decreasing) non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations with elevation throughout the course of the growing season....

Registration Year

  • 2016
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    11

Affiliations

  • University Austral de Chile
    11
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • Instituto de Ecología
    2
  • University of Washington
    1
  • Federal University of São Carlos
    1
  • University of Jaén
    1
  • Lund University
    1
  • University of Extremadura
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    1