3 Works

Data from: Mothers may shape the variations in social organization among gorillas

Andrew M. Robbins, Maryke Gray, Thomas Breuer, Marie Manguette, Emma J. Stokes, Prosper Uwingeli, Innocent Mburanumwe, Edwin Kagoda & Martha M. Robbins
When mothers continue to support their offspring beyond infancy, they can influence the fitness of those offspring, the strength of social relationships within their groups, and the life-history traits of their species. Using up to 30 years of demographic data from 58 groups of gorillas in two study sites, this study extends such findings by showing that mothers may also contribute to differences in social organization between closely related species. Female mountain gorillas remained with...

Data from: The role of inhibitory dynamics in the loss and re-emergence of macropodoid tooth traits

Aidan M. C. Couzens, Alistair Robert Evans, Matthew M. Skinner & Gavin J. Prideaux
The reversibility of phenotypic evolution is likely to be strongly influenced by the ability of underlying developmental systems to generate ancestral traits. However, few studies have quantitatively linked these developmental dynamics to traits which re-evolve. In this study we assess how changes in the inhibitory cascade, a developmental system that regulates relative tooth size in mammals, influenced the loss and reversals of the posthypocristid, a molar tooth crest, in the kangaroo superfamily Macropodoidea. We find...

Data from: Laetoli footprints reveal bipedal gait biomechanics different from those of modern humans and chimpanzees

Kevin G. Hatala, Brigitte Demes & Brian G. Richmond
Bipedalism is a key adaptation that shaped human evolution, yet the timing and nature of its evolution remain unclear. Here we use new experimentally based approaches to investigate the locomotor mechanics preserved by the famous Pliocene hominin footprints from Laetoli, Tanzania. We conducted footprint formation experiments with habitually barefoot humans and with chimpanzees to quantitatively compare their footprints to those preserved at Laetoli. Our results show that the Laetoli footprints are morphologically distinct from those...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
    3
  • University of Kent
    1
  • Flinders University
    1
  • Wildlife Conservation Society
    1
  • Monash University
    1
  • Uganda Wildlife Authority
    1
  • American Museum of Natural History
    1
  • Stony Brook University
    1