12 Works

Data from: Parallel Pleistocene amphitropical disjunctions in a parasitic plant and its host

Adam C. Schneider & Abigail J. Moore
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Aphyllon is a clade of holoparasites that includes closely related North American and South American species parasitic on Grindelia. Both Aphyllon (Orobanchaceae) and Grindelia (Asteraceae) have amphitropical disjunctions between North America and South America; however, the timing of these patterns and the processes to explain them are unknown. METHODS: Chronograms for the Orobanchaceae and Grindelia and their relatives were constructed using fossil and secondary calibration points, one of which was based...

Data from: Genome reduction and microbe-host interactions drive adaptation of a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium associated with a cold seep sponge

Ren-Mao Tian, Weipeng Zhang, Lin Cai, Yue-Him Wong, Wei Ding & Pei-Yuan Qian
As the most ancient metazoan, sponges have established close relationships with particular microbial symbionts. However, the characteristics and physiology of thioautotrophic symbionts in deep-sea sponges are largely unknown. Using a tailored “differential coverage binning” method on 22-Gb metagenomic sequences, we recovered the nearly complete genome of a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) that dominates the microbiota of the cold seep sponge Suberites sp. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that this bacterium (an unclassified gammaproteobacterium termed “Gsub”) may represent a...

Data from: Maternal effects are no match for stressful conditions: a test of the maternal match hypothesis in a common zooplankter.

Jessica E. Beyer & K. David Hambright
1. Maternal effects modulate population responses to environmental conditions and so are predicted to play a large role in the responses of organisms to global change. 2. In response to one such aspect of global change, the eutrophication of freshwaters and associated blooms of the toxin-producing cyanobacteria species Microcystis aeruginosa, the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus produces larger offspring. 3. We hypothesized that rotifers exposed to Microcystis may be adaptively increasing offspring investment and offspring fitness (i.e....

Data from: Exacerbated grassland degradation and desertification in Central Asia during 2000-2014

Geli Zhang, Chandrashekhar M. Biradar, Xiangming Xiao, Jinwei Dong, Yuting Zhou, Yuanwei Qin, Yao Zhang, Fang Liu, Mingjun Ding & Richard J. Thomas
Grassland degradation and desertification is a complex process, including both state conversion (e.g., grasslands to deserts) and gradual within-state change (e.g., greenness dynamics). Existing studies hardly separated the two components and analyzed it as a whole based on time series vegetation index data, which however cannot provide a clear and comprehensive picture for grassland degradation and desertification. Here we proposed an integrated assessment strategy, by considering both state conversion and within-state change of grasslands, to...

Data from: Mechanical and tactile incompatibilities cause reproductive isolation between two young damselfly species

Alexandra A. Barnard, Ola M. Fincke, Mark A. McPeek & John P. Masly
External male reproductive structures have received considerable attention as a cause of reproductive isolation (RI), because the morphology of these structures often evolves rapidly between populations. This rapid evolution presents the potential for mechanical incompatibilities with heterospecific female structures during mating and could thus prevent interbreeding between nascent species. Although such mechanical incompatibilities have received little empirical support as a common cause of RI, the potential for mismatch of reproductive structures to cause RI due...

Data from: Toward a geography of omnivory: omnivores increase carnivory when sodium is limiting

Natalie A. Clay, Richard J. Lehrter & Michael Kaspari
1. Toward understanding the geography of omnivory, we tested three hypotheses that predict the proportion of animal tissue consumed: The Sodium Limitation Hypothesis predicts that omnivores increase animal consumption in Na-poor environments because Na bioaccumulates from plants to predators; thus, heterotrophs are Na-rich sources. The Nitrogen Limitation and Habitat Productivity Hypotheses use the same logic to predict more animal consumption in N-poor and productive environments respectively. 2. Omnivory is a common trophic strategy, but what...

Data from: Host species of a sexual-parasite do not differentiate between clones of Amazon mollies

Amber M. Makowicz, Darrshini S. Muthurajah & Ingo Schlupp
A major mechanism of pre-zygotic isolation is the ability for individuals to recognize conspecifics. In gynogenetic species complexes, the sexual host species occur in syntopy with the unisexual species that relies on the sexuals’ sperm for reproduction, which provide an excellent opportunity for the evolution of fine-tuned species recognition capabilities. Here, we examined if males and females from both parental species (sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna, and Atlantic molly, P. mexicana) can distinguish between different clonal...

Data from: Targeted enrichment of large gene families for phylogenetic inference: phylogeny and molecular evolution of photosynthesis genes in the Portullugo clade (Caryophyllales)

Abigail J. Moore, Jurriaan M. De Vos, Lillian P. Hancock, Eric Goolsby & Erika J. Edwards
Hybrid enrichment is an increasingly popular approach for obtaining hundreds of loci for phylogenetic analysis across many taxa quickly and cheaply. The genes targeted for sequencing are typically single-copy loci, which facilitate a more straightforward sequence assembly and homology assignment process. However, this approach limits the inclusion of most genes of functional interest, which often belong to multi-gene families. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of including large gene families in hybrid enrichment protocols for phylogeny...

Data from: C:N:P stoichiometry in China's forests: from organs to ecosystems

Jiahui Zhang, Ning Zhao, Congcong Liu, Hao Yang, Meiling Li, Guirui Yu, Kevin Wilcox, Qiang Yu & Nianpeng He
Ecological stoichiometry connects different levels of biology, from the gene to the globe, by scaling up elemental ratios (e.g., carbon [C], nitrogen [N], and phosphorus [P]). Thus, ecological stoichiometry could be a powerful tool for revealing certain physiological processes of plants. However, C:N:P stoichiometry remains unclear at the community and ecosystem level, despite it being potentially important for primary productivity. In this study, we measured the C, N, and P content of different plant organs,...

Data from: The microbially-mediated soil organic carbon loss under degenerative succession in an alpine meadow

Yuguang Zhang, Xiao Liu, Jing Cong, Hui Lu, Yuyu Sheng, Xiulei Wang, Diqiang Li, Xueduan Liu, Huaqun Yin, Jizhong Zhou & Ye Deng
Land-cover change has long been recognized as having marked effect on the amount of soil organic carbon (SOC). However, the microbially-mediated processes and mechanisms on SOC are still unclear. In this study, the soil samples in a degenerative succession from alpine meadow to alpine steppe meadow in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau were analyzed using high-throughput technologies, including Illumina sequencing and GeoChip functional gene arrays. The soil microbial community structure and diversity were significantly (P < 0.05)...

Data from: Genetic assignment with isotopes and habitat suitability (GAIAH), a migratory bird case study

Kristen C. Ruegg, Eric C. Anderson, Ryan J. Harrigan, Kristina L. Paxton, Jeffrey F. Kelly, Frank Moore & Thomas B. Smith
1. Identifying migratory connections across the annual cycle is important for studies of migrant ecology, evolution, and conservation. While recent studies have demonstrated the utility of high-resolution SNP-based genetic markers for identifying population-specific migratory patterns, the accuracy of this approach relative to other intrinsic tagging techniques has not yet been assessed. 2. Here, using a straightforward application of Bayes' Rule, we develop a method for combining inferences from high-resolution genetic markers, stable isotopes, and habitat...

Data from: Intraspecific haplotype diversity in Cherleria sedoides L. (Caryophyllaceae) is best explained by chloroplast capture from an extinct species

Abigail J. Moore, Francisco J. Valtueña, Markus S. Dillenberger, Joachim W. Kadereit & Chris D. Preston
Cherleria sedoides, a plant species widespread in alpine areas of the major European mountain ranges and in Scotland, contains two highly divergent chloroplast haplotype groups, one widespread (WH) and one present only in some populations in the Alps (AH). We investigated whether this haplotype diversity is the result of (1) intraspecific differentiation, (2) retention of an ancestral polymorphism or (3) hybridisation. For this purpose, 106 matK sequences from throughout the Caryophyllaceae and 80 trnQ-rps16 and...

Registration Year

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  • University of Oklahoma
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  • Chinese Academy of Sciences
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  • Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research
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  • University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
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  • Minzu University of China
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  • Central South University
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  • The University of Texas at Austin
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  • The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
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  • Royal Botanic Gardens
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