3 Works

Data from: What factors explain the geographic range of mammalian parasites?

James Byers, John Schmidt, Paula Pappalardo, Sarah Haas & Patrick Stephens
Free-living species vary substantially in the extent of their spatial distributions. However, distributions of parasitic species have not been comprehensively compared in this context. We investigated which factors most influence the geographic extent of mammal parasites. Using the Global Mammal Parasite Database we analyzed 17,818 individual geospatial records on 1,806 parasite species (encompassing viruses, bacteria, protozoa, arthropods, and helminths) that infect 396 carnivore, ungulate, and primate host species. As a measure of the geographic extent...

Data from: External temperature and distance from nearest entrance influence microclimates of cave and culvert roosting tri-colored bats Perimyotis subflavus

Samantha Leivers, Melissa Meierhofer, Brian Pierce, Jonah Evans & Michael Morrison
Many North American bat species hibernate in both natural and artificial roosts. Although hibernacula can have high internal climate stability, they still retain spatial variability in their thermal regimes, resulting in various ‘microclimates’ throughout the roost that differ in their characteristics (e.g., temperature, air moisture). These microclimate components can be influenced by factors such as the number of entrances, the depth of the roost, and distance to the nearest entrance of the roost. Tri-colored bats...

Extinct plants of North America north of Mexico

Wesley Knapp, Anne Frances, Reed Noss, Robert Naczi, Alan Weakley, George Gann, Bruce Baldwin, James Miller, Patrick McIntyre, Brent Mishler, Gerry Moore, Richard Olmstead, Anna Strong, Daniel Gluesenkamp & Kathryn Kennedy
The recent study by Humphreys et al., reporting extinction of almost 600 plant species globally, represents a groundbreaking effort at compiling direct data on seed plants. We applaud Humphreys et al. for quantifying plant extinctions because they formulate an important and testable hypothesis. However, their study missed many extinctions and rediscoveries of seed plants in the United States and Canada. Our team of experts has been compiling a list of extinct plants of North America...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
    3
  • University of Washington
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    1
  • California Native Plant Society
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • Texas A&M University
    1
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    1
  • NatureServe
    1
  • The Institute for Regional Conservation
    1