37 Works

Data from: Herbivore release drives parallel patterns of evolutionary divergence in invasive plant phenotypes

Akane Uesugi & André Kessler
1. Herbivory can drive rapid evolution of plant chemical traits mediating defensive and competitive ability. At a geographic scale, plant populations that escape selection from their ancestral herbivores may evolve decreased defense and increased competitiveness. While contrasts between native and invasive populations of plants lend support to this hypothesis, such experiments cannot establish causal links between herbivory and evolved invasive phenotypes. 2. Here, we conducted geographic contrasts, and coupled these with long-term selection experiments that...

Data from: How do different aspects of biodiversity change through time? A case study on an Australian bird community

Jian D. L. Yen, James R. Thomson, Jonathan M. Keith, David M. Paganin & Ralph Mac Nally
The study of ecological communities through time can reveal fundamental ecological processes and is key to understanding how natural and human pressures will affect biodiversity. Most studies of ecological communities through time consider only one or a few summary measures (e.g. species richness, total abundance), which might neglect important aspects of community structure or function. We studied temporal variation in several measures of species diversity, size diversity, and species composition in an intensively sampled bird...

Data from: Convergent local adaptation to climate in distantly related conifers

Sam Yeaman, Kathryn A. Hodgins, Katie E. Lotterhos, Haktan Suren, Simon Nadeau, Kristin A. Nurkowski, Pia Smets, Tongli Wang, Laura K. Gray, Katharina J. Liepe, Andreas Hamann, Jason A. Holliday, Michael C. Whitlock, Loren H. Rieseberg & Sally N. Aitken
When confronted with an adaptive challenge, such as extreme temperature, closely related species frequently evolve similar phenotypes using the same genes. Although such repeated evolution is thought to be less likely in highly polygenic traits and distantly related species, this has not been tested at the genome scale. We performed a population genomic study of convergent local adaptation among two distantly related species, lodgepole pine and interior spruce. We identified a suite of 47 genes,...

Data from: The relationship between diet and body mass in terrestrial mammals

Silvia Pineda-Munoz, Alistair R. Evans & John Alroy
Diet and body mass are highly important factors in mammalian ecology, and they have also proven to be powerful paleoecological indicators. Our previous research has proposed a new classification scheme for mammals with more dietary divisions that emphasizes the primary resource in a given diet. We analyzed a database summarizing the dietary preferences of 139 species of marsupial and placental terrestrial mammals (including 14 orders) and their average body masses in order to explore whether...

Data from: The influence of recent social experience and physical environment on courtship and male aggression

Topi K. Lehtonen, P. Andreas Svensson & Bob B. M. Wong
Background: Social and environmental factors can profoundly impact an individual’s investment of resources into different components of reproduction. Such allocation trade-offs are expected to be amplified under challenging environmental conditions. To test these predictions, we used a desert-dwelling fish, the desert goby, Chlamydogobius eremius, to experimentally investigate the effects of prior social experience (with either a male or a female) on male investment in courtship and aggression under physiologically benign and challenging conditions (i.e., low...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study

Luz Boyero, Richard Pearson, Cang Hui, Mark Gessner, Javier Perez, Markos Alexandrou, Manuel Graça, Bradley Cardinale, Ricardo Albariño, M. Arunachalam, Leon Barmuta, Andrew Boulton, Andreas Bruder, Marcos Callisto, Eric Chauvet, Russell Death, David Dudgeon, Andrea Encalada, Veronica Ferreira, Ricardo Figueroa, Alex Flecker, , Julie Helson, Tomoya Iwata, Tajang Jinggut … & Catherine Yule
Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, have high rates of carbon dioxide evasion and they contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and...

Data from: Evolutionary implications of mitochondrial genetic variation: Mitochondrial genetic effects on OXPHOS respiration and mitochondrial quantity change with age and sex in fruit flies

Jonci N. Wolff, Nicolas Pichaud, Maria F. Camus, Geneviève Côté, Pierre U. Blier & Damian K. Dowling
The ancient acquisition of the mitochondrion into the ancestor of modern-day eukaryotes is thought to have been pivotal in facilitating the evolution of complex life. Mitochondria retain their own diminutive genome, with mitochondrial genes encoding core subunits involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Traditionally, it was assumed that there was little scope for genetic variation to accumulate and be maintained within the mitochondrial genome. However, in the past decade, mitochondrial genetic variation has been routinely tied to...

Data from: Dispersal duration mediates selection on offspring size

Karin Svanfeldt, Keyne Monro & Dustin J. Marshall
Offspring size varies at all levels of organisation, among species, mothers and clutches. This variation is thought to be the result of a tradeoff between offspring quality and quantity, where larger offspring perform better but are more costly to produce. Local environmental conditions alter the benefits of increased offspring size and thereby mediate selection on this trait. For sessile organisms, dispersal is a crucial part of the offspring phase, and in animals, bigger offspring tend...

Data from: Geographic variation in hybridization and ecological differentiation between three syntopic, morphologically similar species of montane lizards

Margaret L. Haines, Jane Melville, Joanna Sumner, Nick Clemann, David G. Chapple & Devi Stuart-Fox
To understand factors shaping species boundaries in closely related taxa, a powerful approach is to compare levels of genetic admixture at multiple points of contact and determine how this relates to intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic, morphological and ecological differentiation. In the Australian Alps, the threatened alpine bog skink Pseudemoia cryodroma co-occurs with two morphologically and ecologically similar congeners, P. entrecasteauxii and P. pagenstecheri, and all three species are suspected to hybridize. We...

Data from: Nitrogen loads influence trophic organization of estuarine fish assemblages

Fiona Y. Warry, Paul Reich, Perran L. M. Cook, Ralph Mac Nally, James R. Thomson & Ryan J. Woodland
Nutrient (N and P) loading may affect functioning in aquatic ecosystems by restructuring producer assemblages with flow-on effects to consumers. Trophic niche occupancy and trophic organization of consumers are key components of ecosystem function that have been increasingly investigated using quantitative isotopic niche indices. These indices are based on the premise that the isotopic values of consumer tissues indicate their assimilated diet. Typically, isotopic niche indices are calculated using only consumer isotope data, which limit...

Data from: Unravelling anisogamy: egg size and ejaculate size mediate selection on morphology in free-swimming sperm

Keyne Monro & Dustin J. Marshall
Gamete dimorphism (anisogamy) defines the sexes in most multicellular organisms. Theoretical explanations for its maintenance usually emphasize the size-related selection pressures of sperm competition and zygote survival, assuming that fertilization of all eggs precludes selection for phenotypes that enhance fertility. In external fertilizers, however, fertilization is often incomplete due to sperm limitation, and the risk of polyspermy weakens the advantage of high sperm numbers that is predicted to limit sperm size, allowing alternative selection pressures...

Data from: The effect of colour-producing mechanisms on plumage sexual dichromatism in passerines and parrots

Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
Sexual dichromatism (SD) often reflects intense sexual selection on males. It has been hypothesized that sexual selection should favour the elaboration of those male colours that honestly signal quality and that such colours should therefore show higher SD. Costliness of colours is expected to vary according to their production mechanism (pigment type, feather microstructure and combinations thereof). Carotenoid-based colours, due to their dietary origin and competing functions of carotenoid pigments, are the best documented costly...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    37

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    37

Affiliations

  • Monash University
    37
  • University of Melbourne
    4
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    2
  • Flinders University
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2