49 Works

Data from: Signatures of polygenic adaptation associated with climate across the range of a threatened fish species with high genetic connectivity

Katherine A. Harrisson, Stephen J. Amish, Alexandra Pavlova, Shawn R. Narum, Marina Telonis-Scott, Meaghan L. Rourke, Jarod Lyon, Zeb Tonkin, Dean M. Gilligan, Brett A. Ingram, Mark Lintermans, Han Ming Gan, Christopher M. Austin, Gordon Luikart & Paul Sunnucks
Adaptive differences across species’ ranges can have important implications for population persistence and conservation management decisions. Despite advances in genomic technologies, detecting adaptive variation in natural populations remains challenging. Key challenges in gene-environment association studies involve distinguishing the effects of drift from those of selection, and identifying subtle signatures of polygenic adaptation. We used paired-end restriction-site associated-DNA sequencing data (6605 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) to examine population structure and test for signatures of adaptation...

Data from: Climate-driven mitochondrial selection: a test in Australian songbirds

Annika M. Lamb, Han Ming Gan, Chris Greening, Leo Joseph, Yin P. Lee, Alejandra Morán-Ordóñez & Paul Sunnucks
Diversifying selection between populations that inhabit different environments can promote lineage divergence within species and ultimately drive speciation. The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) encodes essential proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system and can be a strong target for climate-driven selection (i.e. associated with inhabiting different climates). We investigated whether Pleistocene climate changes drove mitochondrial selection and evolution within Australian birds. First, using phylogeographic analyses of the mitochondrial ND2 gene for 17 songbird species, we identified...

Data from: The quantitative genetic basis of clinal divergence in phenotypic plasticity

Belinda Van Heerwaarden & Carla M. Sgrò
Phenotypic plasticity is thought to be an important mechanism for adapting to environmental heterogeneity. Nonetheless, the genetic basis of plasticity is still not well understood. In Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans, body size and thermal stress resistance show clinal patterns along the east coast of Australia, and exhibit plastic responses to different developmental temperatures. The genetic basis of thermal plasticity, and whether the genetic effects underlying clinal variation in traits and their plasticity are similar,...

Data from: Experience buffers extrinsic mortality in a group-living bird species

Michael Griesser, Emeline Mourocq, Jonathan Barnaby, Katharine Bowegen, Sönke Eggers, Kevin Fletcher, Radoslav Kozma, Franziska Kurz, Anssi Laurila, Magdalena Nystrand, Enrico Sorato, Jan Ekman & Katharine M. Bowgen
Extrinsic mortality has a strong impact on the evolution of life-histories, prey morphology and behavioural adaptations, but for many animals the causes of mortality are poorly understood. Predation is an important driver of extrinsic mortality and mobile animals form groups in response to increased predation risk. Furthermore, in many species juveniles suffer higher mortality than older individuals, which may reflect a lower phenotypic quality, lower competitiveness, or a lack of antipredator or foraging skills. Here...

Data from: Assessing the sensitivity of biodiversity indices used to inform fire management

Katherine M. Giljohann, Luke T. Kelly, Jemima Connell, Michael F. Clarke, Rohan H. Clarke, Tracey J. Regan & Michael A. McCarthy
Biodiversity indices are widely used to summarise changes in the distribution and abundance of multiple species and measure progress towards management targets. However, the sensitivity of biodiversity indices to the data, landscape classification and conservation values underpinning them are rarely interrogated. There are limited studies to help scientists and land managers use biodiversity indices in the presence of fire and vegetation succession. The geometric mean of species’ relative abundance or occurrence (G) is a biodiversity...

Data from: Detecting elusive aspects of wildlife ecology using drones: new insights on the mating dynamics and operational sex ratios of sea turtles

Gail Schofield, Kostas A. Katselidis, Martin K. S. Lilley, Richard D. Reina & Graeme C. Hays
Offspring and breeding (operational) sex ratios (OSR) are a key component of demographic studies. While offspring sex ratios are often relatively easy to measure, measuring OSRs is often far more problematic. Yet highly skewed OSRs, and a lack of male-female encounters, may be an important extinction driver. Using loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) as a case study, we showed the utility of drones, i.e. unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to distinguish adult males and females in...

Data from: Task-related effective connectivity reveals that the cortical rich club gates cortex-wide communication

Mario Senden, Niels Reuter, Martijn P. Van Den Heuvel, Rainer Goebel, Gustavo Deco & Matthieu Gilson
Higher cognition may require the globally coordinated integration of specialized brain regions into functional networks. A collection of structural cortical hubs—referred to as the rich club—has been hypothesized to support task-specific functional integration. In the present paper, we use a whole-cortex model to estimate directed interactions between 68 cortical regions from functional magnetic resonance imaging activity for four different tasks (reflecting different cognitive domains) and resting state. We analyze the state-dependent input and output effective...

Data from: Enhancing plant diversity in a novel grassland using seed addition

Tara J. Zamin, Alex Jolly, Steve Sinclair, John W. Morgan & Joslin L. Moore
1.Restoration of novel ecosystems to a historical benchmark may not always be possible or advisable. Novel ecosystems may be managed by targeting specific components and accepting the novelty of other ecosystem attributes. The feasibility of this component-wise management of novel ecosystems has rarely been tested. 2.In a novel grassland, where C3 grasses have replaced C4 grasses, nutrients have been elevated, and diversity has been lost due to a history of agricultural land use, we aimed...

Data from: How important is thermal history? Evidence for lasting effects of developmental temperature on upper thermal limits in Drosophila melanogaster

Vanessa Kellermann, Belinda Van Heerwaarden & Carla M. Sgrò
A common practice in thermal biology is to take individuals directly from the field and estimate a range of thermal traits. These estimates are then used in studies aiming to understand broad scale distributional patterns, understanding and predicting the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, and generating predictions for climate change risk. However, the use of field-caught individuals in such studies ignores the fact that many traits are phenotypically plastic and will be influenced by the thermal...

Data from: Relaxation of herbivore-mediated selection drives the evolution of genetic covariances between plant competitive and defense traits

Akane Uesugi, Tim Connallon, Andre Kessler & Keyne Monro
Insect herbivores are important mediators of selection on traits that impact plant defense against herbivory and competitive ability. Although recent experiments demonstrate a central role for herbivory in driving rapid evolution of defense and competition-mediating traits, whether and how herbivory shapes heritable variation in these traits remains poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the structure and evolutionary stability of the G matrix for plant metabolites that are involved in defense and allelopathy in the tall goldenrod,...

Data from: Wolbachia infection alters the relative abundance of resident bacteria in adult Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, but not larvae

Michelle D. Audsley, Andrei Seleznev, D. Albert Joubert, Megan Woolfit, Scott L. O'Neill & Elizabeth A. McGraw
Insect-symbiont interactions are known to play key roles in host functions and fitness. The common insect endosymbiont Wolbachia can reduce the ability of several human pathogens, including arboviruses and the malaria parasite, to replicate in insect hosts. Wolbachia does not naturally infect Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue virus, but transinfected Ae. aegypti have anti-dengue virus properties and are currently being trialled as a dengue biocontrol strategy. Here, we assess the impact of Wolbachia...

Data from: Real-time social selection maintains honesty of a dynamic visual signal in cooperative fish

Judith C. Bachmann, Fabio Cortesi, Matthew D. Hall, N. Justin Marshall, Walter Salzburger & Hugo F. Gante
Our understanding of animal communication has been largely driven by advances in theory since empirical evidence has been difficult to obtain. Costly signaling theory became the dominant paradigm explaining the evolution of honest signals, according to which communication reliability relies on differential costs imposed on signalers to distinguish animals of different quality. On the other hand, mathematical models disagree on the source of costs at the communication equilibrium. Here we present an empirical framework to...

Data from: The remarkable convergence of skull shape in crocodilians and toothed whales

Matthew R. McCurry, Alistair R. Evans, Erich M.G. Fitzgerald, Justin W. Adams, Philip D. Clausen, Colin R. McHenry & Erich M. G. Fitzgerald
The striking resemblance of long-snouted aquatic mammals and reptiles has long been considered an example of morphological convergence, yet the true cause of this similarity remains untested. We addressed this deficit through three-dimensional morphometric analysis of the full diversity of crocodilian and toothed whale (Odontoceti) skull shapes. Our focus on biomechanically important aspects of shape allowed us to overcome difficulties involved in comparing mammals and reptiles, which have fundamental differences in the number and position...

Data from: Interactions between host sex and age of exposure modify the virulence-transmission trade-off

Stephen A.Y. Gipson, Matthew D. Hall & S. A. Y. Gipson
The patterns of immunity conferred by host sex or age represent two sources of host heterogeneity that can potentially shape the evolutionary trajectory of disease. With each host sex or age encountered, a pathogen’s optimal exploitative strategy may change, leading to considerable variation in expression of pathogen transmission and virulence. To date, these host characteristics have been studied in the context of host fitness alone, overlooking the effects of host sex and age on the...

Data from: No fitness benefits of early molt in a fairy-wren: relaxed sexual selection under genetic monogamy?

Marie Fan, Michelle L. Hall, Sjouke A. Kingma, Lisa M. Mandeltort, Nataly Hidalgo Aranzamendi, Kaspar Delhey & Anne Peters
The evolution of male ornamentation has long been the focus of sexual selection studies. However, evidence is accumulating that sexually selected traits can also be lost, although the process is ill-understood. In male fairy-wrens (Malurus spp.), early molt into the seasonal breeding plumage is critical for obtaining extra-pair paternity (EPP), which reaches very high levels in these socially monogamous songbirds. A notable exception is the purple-crowned fairy-wren, Malurus coronatus, which, like its congeners, breeds cooperatively,...

Data from: Darker where cold and wet: Australian birds follow their own version of Gloger's rule

Kaspar Delhey
Gloger's rule is usually interpreted as predicting darker coloured animals in warmer and more humid/vegetated regions. The relative importance of temperature and rainfall or vegetation is however unclear, and often only one variable is tested at a time, mainly through proxies. Here, I assess the predictions of Gloger's rule for interspecific achromatic plumage variation (dark to light variation) for an entire avifauna (551 species of Australian landbirds). I tested the effects of climatic variables (temperature...

Data from: Genotypic covariance between the performance of a resident species and community assembly in the field

Arthur M. Riedel, Keyne Monro, Mark W. Blows & Dustin J. Marshall
1.Genetic variation in resident species can influence the assembly and dynamics of communities, but the potential for these genetic effects to persist across generations is largely unresolved. In principle, persistent, directional changes in communities are only predicted when community properties covary genetically with the fitness of resident species. 2.Estimates of genetic covariance between the fitness of a resident species and its community are therefore necessary to ‘close the eco-evolutionary loop’ in studies of community genetics,...

Data from: Cooperative defence operates by social modulation of biogenic amine levels in the honeybee brain

Morgane Nouvian, Souvik Mandal, Charlène Jamme, Charles Claudianos, Patrizia D'Ettorre, Judith Reinhard, Andrew B. Barron & Martin Giurfa
The defence of a society often requires that some specialized members coordinate to repel a threat at personal risk. This is especially true for honeybee guards, which defend the hive and may sacrifice their lives upon stinging. Central to this cooperative defensive response is the sting alarm pheromone, which has isoamyl acetate (IAA) as its main component. Although this defensive behaviour has been well described, the neural mechanisms triggered by IAA to coordinate stinging have...

Data from: The contribution of the mitochondrial genome to sex-specific fitness variance

Shane R. T. Smith & Tim Connallon
Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) facilitates the evolutionary accumulation of mutations with sex-biased fitness effects. Whereas maternal inheritance closely aligns mtDNA evolution with natural selection in females, it makes it indifferent to evolutionary changes that exclusively benefit males. The constrained response of mtDNA to selection in males can lead to asymmetries in the relative contributions of mitochondrial genes to female versus male fitness variation. Here, we examine the impact of genetic drift and the...

Data from: Does the cost of development scale allometrically with offspring size?

Amanda K. Pettersen, Craig R. White, Robert J. Bryson-Richardson & Dustin J. Marshall
1.Within many species, larger offspring have higher fitness. While the presence of an offspring size-fitness relationship is canonical in life-history theory, the mechanisms that determine why this relationship exists are unclear. 2.Linking metabolic theory to life-history theory could provide a general explanation for why larger offspring often perform better than smaller offspring. In many species, energy reserves at the completion of development drive differences in offspring fitness. Development is costly so any factor that decreases...

Data from: Sex-specific shifts in morphology and colour pattern polymorphism during range expansion of an invasive lizard

Kimberly A. Miller, Andressa Duran, Jane Melville, Michael B. Thompson & David G. Chapple
Aim: Human-assisted range expansion of animals to new environments can lead to phenotypic shifts over ecological timescales.We investigated whether phenotypic changes are sex-specific using an invasive lizard (Lampropholis delicata). Location: Pacific region (Hawaiian Islands, Lord Howe Island, New Zealand, eastern Australia) Methods: Using our knowledge of theintroduction history of L. delicata, we examined museum specimens of individuals collected across the native and introduced range to determine whether shifts in morphologyor colour pattern polymorphism had occurred...

Data from: Investigating movement in the laboratory: dispersal apparatus designs and the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

Pieter A. Arnold, Michelle A. Rafter, Rokhsareh Malekpour, Phillip Cassey, Gimme H. Walter & Craig R. White
The natural dispersal of Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) has been emulated in the laboratory for more than 50 years, using a simple dispersal apparatus. This has typically comprised of a starting container (initial resource or patch) connected by tubing, which contains thread for the animals to climb into a tube and hence to an end container. That is, beetles move to a new viable resource or patch from an inter-patch zone or non-viable habitat....

Data from: Artificial barriers prevent genetic recovery of small isolated populations of a low-mobility freshwater fish

Rhys A. Coleman, Bertrand Gauffre, Alexandra Pavlova, Luciano B. Beheregaray, Joanne Kearns, Jarod Lyon, Minami Sasaki, Raphael Leblois, Carla Sgro & Paul Sunnucks
Habitat loss and fragmentation often result in small, isolated populations vulnerable to environmental disturbance and loss of genetic diversity. Low genetic diversity can increase extinction risk of small populations by elevating inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and reducing adaptive potential. Due to their linear nature and extensive use by humans, freshwater ecosystems are especially vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation. Although the effects of fragmentation on genetic structure have been extensively studied in migratory fish, they...

Data from: Sexual selection on spontaneous mutations strengthens the between-sex genetic correlation for fitness

Scott Lee Allen, Katrina McGuigan, Tim Connallon, Mark W. Blows & Stephen F. Chenoweth
A proposed benefit to sexual selection is that it promotes purging of deleterious mutations from populations. For this benefit to be realised, sexual selection, which is usually stronger on males, must purge mutations deleterious to both sexes. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that sexual selection on males purges deleterious mutations that affect both male and female fitness. We measured male and female fitness in two panels of spontaneous mutation-accumulation lines of the fly, Drosophila...

Data from: Field manipulations of resources mediate the transition from intraspecific competition to facilitation

Karin Svanfeldt, Keyne Monro & Dustin J. Marshall
1. Population density affects individual performance, though its effects are often mixed. For sessile species, increases in population density typically reduce performance. Still, cases of positive density dependence do occur in these systems and demand explanation. The stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) predicts that under stressful conditions, positive effects of facilitation may outweigh the negative effects of competition. 2. While some elements of the SGH are well studied, its potential to explain intraspecific facilitation has received...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    49

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49

Affiliations

  • Monash University
    49
  • University of Melbourne
    7
  • University of Queensland
    5
  • La Trobe University
    4
  • Deakin University
    3
  • University of Sydney
    3
  • University of Canberra
    3
  • Monash University Malaysia
    2
  • University of Groningen
    2
  • Flinders University
    2