459 Works

Data from: Highly asymmetric fine-scale genetic structure between sexes of African striped mice and indication for condition dependent alternative male dispersal tactics

Nils Solmsen, Jes Johannesen & Carsten Schradin
Sex-biased dispersal is observed in many taxa, but few studies have compared sex-biased dispersal among and within populations. We addressed the magnitude and habitat dependency of sex-biased dispersal in social African striped mice by separating group-related from population-related genetic variance to understand the contribution of each sex to deme structure. As dispersal over unoccupied habitat is likely to be more costly than dispersal within a population, we predicted that individuals leaving the natal population have...

Data from: Selection, genome-wide fitness effects and evolutionary rates in the model legume Medicago truncatula

Timothy Paape, Thomas Bataillon, Peng Zhou, Tom J. Y. Kono, Roman Briskine, Nevin D. Young & Peter Tiffin
Sequence data for >20 000 annotated genes from 56 accessions of Medicago truncatula were used to identify potential targets of positive selection, the determinants of evolutionary rate variation and the relative importance of positive and purifying selection in shaping nucleotide diversity. Based upon patterns of intraspecific diversity and interspecific divergence, c. 50–75% of nonsynonymous polymorphisms are subject to strong purifying selection and 1% of the sampled genes harbour a signature of positive selection. Combining polymorphism...

Data from: Quantitative genetic divergence and standing genetic (co)variance in thermal reaction norms along latitude

David Berger, Erik Postma, Wolf Blanckenhorn, Richard John Walters & Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
Although the potential to adapt to warmer climate is constrained by genetic trade-offs, our understanding of how selection and mutation shape genetic (co)variances in thermal reaction norms is poor. Using 71 isofemale lines of the fly Sepsis punctum, originating from northern, central and southern European climates, we tested for divergence in juvenile development rate across latitude at five experimental temperatures. To investigate effects of evolutionary history in different climates on standing genetic variation in reaction...

Data from: A palaeoequatorial Ornithischian and new constraints on early dinosaur diversification

Paul M. Barrett, Richard J. Butler, Roland Mundil, Torsten M. Scheyer, Randall B. Irmis, Marcelo R. Sánchez-Villagra & M. R. Sanchez-Villagra
Current characterizations of early dinosaur evolution are incomplete: existing palaeobiological and phylogenetic scenarios are based on a fossil record dominated by saurischians and the implications of the early ornithischian record are often overlooked. Moreover, the timings of deep phylogenetic divergences within Dinosauria are poorly constrained owing to the absence of a rigorous chronostratigraphical framework for key Late Triassic–Early Jurassic localities. A new dinosaur from the earliest Jurassic of the Venezuelan Andes is the first basal...

Data from: Modelling plant species distribution in alpine grasslands using airborne imaging spectroscopy

Julien Pottier, Zbyněk Malenovský, Achilleas Psomas, Lucie Homolová, Michael E. Schaepman, Philippe Choler, Wilfried Thuiller, Antoine Guisan & Niklaus E. Zimmermann
Remote sensing using airborne imaging spectroscopy (AIS) is known to retrieve fundamental optical properties of ecosystems. However, the value of these properties for predicting plant species distribution remains unclear. Here, we assess whether such data can add value to topographic variables for predicting plant distributions in French and Swiss alpine grasslands. We fitted statistical models with high spectral and spatial resolution reflectance data and tested four optical indices sensitive to leaf chlorophyll content, leaf water...

Data from: Anxiety-like behavioural inhibition is normative under environmental threat-reward correlations

Dominik R. Bach
Behavioural inhibition is a key anxiety-like behaviour in rodents and humans, distinct from avoidance of danger, and reduced by anxiolytic drugs. In some situations, it is not clear how behavioural inhibition minimises harm or maximises benefit for the agent, and can even appear counterproductive. Extant explanations of this phenomenon make use of descriptive models but do not provide a formal assessment of its adaptive value. This hampers a better understanding of the neural computations underlying...

Data from: Conflicting selection on the timing of germination in a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana

Reiko Akiyama & Jon Agren
The timing of germination is a key life-history trait that may strongly influence plant fitness and that sets the stage for selection on traits expressed later in the life cycle. In seasonal environments, the period favourable for germination and the total length of the growing season are limited. The optimal timing of germination may therefore be governed by conflicting selection through survival and fecundity. We conducted a field experiment to examine the effects of timing...

Data from: Genic rather than genome-wide differences between sexually deceptive Ophrys orchids with different pollinators

Khalid E. M. Sedeek, Giovanni Scopece, Yannick M. Staedler, Jürg Schönenberger, Salvatore Cozzolino, Florian P. Schiestl & Philipp M. Schlüter
High pollinator specificity and the potential for simple genetic changes to affect pollinator attraction make sexually deceptive orchids an ideal system for the study of ecological speciation, in which change of flower odour is likely important. This study surveys reproductive barriers and differences in floral phenotypes in a group of four closely related, co-flowering sympatric Ophrys species, and uses a genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach to obtain information on the proportion of the genome that...

Data from: Female house mice avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males in a mate choice experiment

Andri Manser, Barbara König & Anna K. Lindholm
The t haplotype in house mice is a well-known selfish genetic element with detrimental, nonadditive fitness consequences to its carriers: recessive lethal mutations cause t/t homozygotes to perish in utero. Given the severe genetic incompatibility imposed by the t haplotype, we predict females to avoid fertilization by t haplotype incompatible males. Indeed, some of the strongest evidence for compatibility mate choice is related to the t haplotype in house mice. However, all previous evidence for...

Data from: Condition dependence and the maintenance of genetic variance in a sexually dimorphic black scavenger fly

Cait Dmitriew & Wolf U. Blanckenhorn
The maintenance of genetic variation in traits under strong sexual selection is a longstanding problem in evolutionary biology. The genic capture model proposes that this problem can be explained by the evolution of condition dependence in exaggerated male traits. We tested the predictions that condition dependence should be more pronounced in male sexual traits and that genetic variance in expression of these traits should increase under stress as among-genotype variation in overall condition is exposed....

Data from: Small beetle, large-scale drivers: how regional and landscape factors affect outbreaks of the European spruce bark beetle

Rupert Seidl, Jörg Müller, Torsten Hothorn, Claus Bässler, Marco Heurich & Markus Kautz
Unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks have been observed for a variety of forest ecosystems recently, and damage is expected to further intensify as a consequence of climate change. In Central Europe, the response of ecosystem management to increasing infestation risk has hitherto focused largely on the stand level, while the contingency of outbreak dynamics on large-scale drivers remains poorly understood. To investigate how factors beyond the local scale contribute to the infestation risk from Ips typographus...

Data from: Fine-scale kin recognition in the absence of social familiarity in the Siberian jay, a monogamous bird species

Michael Griesser, Peter Halvarsson, Szymon M. Drobniak & Carles Vilà
Kin recognition is a critical element to kin cooperation, and in vertebrates, it is primarily based on associative learning. Recognition of socially unfamiliar kin occurs rarely, and it is reported only in vertebrate species where promiscuity prevents recognition of first-order relatives. However, it is unknown whether the recognition of socially unfamiliar kin can evolve in monogamous species. Here, we investigate whether genetic relatedness modulates aggression among group members in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus). This bird...

Data from: Discordant patterns of genetic and phenotypic differentiation in five grasshopper species co-distributed across a microreserve network

Joaquín Ortego, Vicente García-Navas, Víctor Noguerales & Pedro Javier Cordero
Conservation plans can be greatly improved when information on the evolutionary and demographic consequences of habitat fragmentation is available for several co-distributed species. Here, we study spatial patterns of phenotypic and genetic variation among five grasshopper species that are co-distributed across a network of microreserves but show remarkable differences in dispersal-related morphology (body size and wing length), degree of habitat specialization and extent of fragmentation of their respective habitats in the study region. In particular,...

Data from: In search of genetic constraints limiting the evolution of egg size: Direct and correlated responses to artificial selection on a prenatal maternal effector

Joel Pick, Pascale Hutter & Barbara Tschirren
Maternal effects are an important force in nature, but the evolutionary dynamics of the traits that cause them are not well understood. Egg size is known to be a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects with an established genetic basis. Contrary to theoretical expectations for fitness-related traits, there is a large amount of additive genetic variation in egg size observed in natural populations. One possible mechanism for the maintenance of this variation is through genetic...

Data from: Paternal-specific S-allele transmission in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.): the potential for sexual selection

Afif Hedhly, Ana Wünsch, Önder Kartal, María Herrero & José Ignacio Hormaza
Homomorphic self-incompatibility is a well-studied example of a physiological process that is thought to increase population diversity and reduce the expression of inbreeding depression. Whereas theoretical models predict the presence of a large number of S-haplotypes with equal frequencies at equilibrium, unequal allele frequencies have been repeatedly reported and attributed to sampling effects, population structure, demographic perturbation, sheltered deleterious mutations or selection pressure on linked genes. However, it is unclear to what extent unequal segregations...

Data from: Reduced flight-to-light behaviour of moth populations exposed to long-term urban light pollution

Florian Altermatt & Dieter Ebert
The globally increasing light pollution is a well-recognized threat to ecosystems, with negative effects on human, animal and plant wellbeing. The most well-known and widely documented consequence of light pollution is the generally fatal attraction of nocturnal insects to artificial light sources. However, the evolutionary consequences are unknown. Here we report that moth populations from urban areas with high, globally relevant levels of light pollution over several decades show a significantly reduced flight-to-light behaviour compared...

Data from: Taxonomic delimitation of the rare, eastern North American endemic lichen Santessoniella crossophylla (Pannariaceae)

James C. Lendemer, Heather B. Stone & Erin A. Tripp
The taxonomic delimitation and generic placement of Santessoniella crossophylla (Old Gray Crosslobes), a cyanolichen endemic to eastern North America, are revisited based on newly generated nrITS and mtSSU sequences. A population from Nova Scotia whose identification as S. crossophylla has been questioned is confirmed as belonging to the species. The monospecific genus Rockefellera is introduced to accommodate lichens ascribable to S. crossophylla in light of molecular results herein presented. The new name honors the Rockefeller...

Data from: A structural approach for understanding multispecies coexistence

Serguei Saavedra, Rudolf P. Rohr, Jordi Bascompte, Oscar Godoy, Nathan J.B. Kraft, Jonathan M. Levine & Nathan J. B. Kraft
Although observations of species-rich communities have long served as a primary motivation for research on the coexistence of competitors, the majority of our empirical and theoretical understanding comes from two-species systems. How much of the coexistence observed in species rich communities results from indirect effects among competitors that only emerge in diverse systems remains poorly understood. Resolving this issue requires simple, scalable, and intuitive metrics for quantifying the conditions for coexistence in multispecies systems, and...

Data from: Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity

Svantje Tauber, Beatrice A. Lauber, Katrin Paulsen, Liliana E. Layer, Martin Lehmann, Swantje Hauschild, Naomi R. Shepherd, Jennifer Polzer, Jurgen Segerer, Cora S. Thiel & Oliver Ullrich
The immune system is one of the most affected systems of the human body during space flight. The cells of the immune system are exceptionally sensitive to microgravity. Thus, serious concerns arise, whether space flight associated weakening of the immune system ultimately precludes the expansion of human presence beyond the Earth's orbit. For human space flight, it is an urgent need to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which altered gravity influences and changes...

Data from: Miocene flooding events of western Amazonia

Carlos Jaramillo, Ingrid Romero, Carlos D'Apolito, German Bayona, Edward Duarte, Stephen Louwye, Jaime Escobar, Javier Luque, Jorge D. Carrillo-Briceño, Vladimir Zapata, Andrés Mora, Stefan Schouten, Michael Zavada, Guy Harrington, John Ortiz & Frank P. Wesselingh
There is a considerable controversy about whether western Amazonia was ever covered by marine waters during the Miocene [23 to 5 Ma (million years ago)]. We investigated the possible occurrence of Miocene marine incursions in the Llanos and Amazonas/Solimões basins, using sedimentological and palynological data from two sediment cores taken in eastern Colombia and northwestern Brazil together with seismic information. We observed two distinct marine intervals in the Llanos Basin, an early Miocene that lasted...

Data from: The strength of the association between heterozygosity and probability of interannual local recruitment increases with environmental harshness in blue tits

Esperanza S. Ferrer, Vicente García-Navas, Juan José Sanz & Joaquín Ortego
The extent of inbreeding depression and the magnitude of heterozygosity–fitness correlations (HFC) have been suggested to depend on the environmental context in which they are assayed, but little evidence is available for wild populations. We combine extensive molecular and capture–mark–recapture data from a blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) population to (1) analyze the relationship between heterozygosity and probability of interannual adult local recruitment and (2) test whether environmental stress imposed by physiologically suboptimal temperatures and rainfall...

Data from: Predation risk drives the expression of mobbing across bird species

Filipe C.R. Cunha, Julio C.R. Fontenelle & Michael Griesser
Many species approach predators to harass and drive them away, even though mobbing a predator can be deadly. However, not all species display this behavior, and those that do can exhibit different behaviors while mobbing different predators. Here we experimentally assessed the role of social and ecological traits on the expression of mobbing behavior in a bird community in SE Brazil (n=157 species). We exposed birds to models of two morphologically similar diurnal owls that...

Data from: The physical boundaries of public goods cooperation between surface-attached bacterial cells

Michael Weigert & Rolf Kuemmerli
Bacteria secrete a variety of compounds important for nutrient scavenging, competition mediation and infection establishment. While there is a general consensus that secreted compounds can be shared and therefore have social consequences for the bacterial collective, we know little about the physical limits of such bacterial social interactions. Here, we address this issue by studying the sharing of iron-scavenging siderophores between surface-attached microcolonies of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Using single-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that...

Data from: Increased prenatal maternal investment reduces inbreeding depression in offspring

Kate E. Ihle, Pascale Hutter & Barbara Tschirren
Inbreeding depression refers to the reduction of fitness that results from matings between relatives. Evidence for reduced fitness in inbred individuals is widespread, but the strength of inbreeding depression varies widely both within and among taxa. Environmental conditions can mediate this variation in the strength of inbreeding depression, with environmental stress exacerbating the negative consequences of inbreeding. Parents can modify the environment experienced by offspring, and have thus the potential to mitigate the negative consequences...

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