59 Works

Data from: In search of genetic constraints limiting the evolution of egg size: Direct and correlated responses to artificial selection on a prenatal maternal effector

Joel Pick, Pascale Hutter & Barbara Tschirren
Maternal effects are an important force in nature, but the evolutionary dynamics of the traits that cause them are not well understood. Egg size is known to be a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects with an established genetic basis. Contrary to theoretical expectations for fitness-related traits, there is a large amount of additive genetic variation in egg size observed in natural populations. One possible mechanism for the maintenance of this variation is through genetic...

Data from: Paternal-specific S-allele transmission in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.): the potential for sexual selection

Afif Hedhly, Ana Wünsch, Önder Kartal, María Herrero & José Ignacio Hormaza
Homomorphic self-incompatibility is a well-studied example of a physiological process that is thought to increase population diversity and reduce the expression of inbreeding depression. Whereas theoretical models predict the presence of a large number of S-haplotypes with equal frequencies at equilibrium, unequal allele frequencies have been repeatedly reported and attributed to sampling effects, population structure, demographic perturbation, sheltered deleterious mutations or selection pressure on linked genes. However, it is unclear to what extent unequal segregations...

Data from: Reduced flight-to-light behaviour of moth populations exposed to long-term urban light pollution

Florian Altermatt & Dieter Ebert
The globally increasing light pollution is a well-recognized threat to ecosystems, with negative effects on human, animal and plant wellbeing. The most well-known and widely documented consequence of light pollution is the generally fatal attraction of nocturnal insects to artificial light sources. However, the evolutionary consequences are unknown. Here we report that moth populations from urban areas with high, globally relevant levels of light pollution over several decades show a significantly reduced flight-to-light behaviour compared...

Data from: Miocene flooding events of western Amazonia

Carlos Jaramillo, Ingrid Romero, Carlos D'Apolito, German Bayona, Edward Duarte, Stephen Louwye, Jaime Escobar, Javier Luque, Jorge D. Carrillo-Briceño, Vladimir Zapata, Andrés Mora, Stefan Schouten, Michael Zavada, Guy Harrington, John Ortiz & Frank P. Wesselingh
There is a considerable controversy about whether western Amazonia was ever covered by marine waters during the Miocene [23 to 5 Ma (million years ago)]. We investigated the possible occurrence of Miocene marine incursions in the Llanos and Amazonas/Solimões basins, using sedimentological and palynological data from two sediment cores taken in eastern Colombia and northwestern Brazil together with seismic information. We observed two distinct marine intervals in the Llanos Basin, an early Miocene that lasted...

Data from: The strength of the association between heterozygosity and probability of interannual local recruitment increases with environmental harshness in blue tits

Esperanza S. Ferrer, Vicente García-Navas, Juan José Sanz & Joaquín Ortego
The extent of inbreeding depression and the magnitude of heterozygosity–fitness correlations (HFC) have been suggested to depend on the environmental context in which they are assayed, but little evidence is available for wild populations. We combine extensive molecular and capture–mark–recapture data from a blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) population to (1) analyze the relationship between heterozygosity and probability of interannual adult local recruitment and (2) test whether environmental stress imposed by physiologically suboptimal temperatures and rainfall...

Data from: How do cold-adapted plants respond to climatic cycles? interglacial expansion explains current distribution and genomic diversity in Primula farinosa L.

Spyros Theodoridis, Christophe Randin, Peter Szövényi, Florian C. Boucher, Theofania S. Patsiou & Elena Conti
Understanding the effects of past climatic fluctuations on the distribution and population-size dynamics of cold-adapted species is essential for predicting their responses to ongoing global climate change. In spite of the heterogeneity of cold-adapted species, two main contrasting hypotheses have been proposed to explain their responses to Late Quaternary glacial cycles, namely, the interglacial contraction versus the interglacial expansion hypotheses. Here, we use the cold-adapted plant Primula farinosa to test two demographic models under each...

Data from: Information use shapes the dynamics of range expansions into environmental gradients

Emanuel A. Fronhofer, Nicolai Nitsche & Florian Altermatt
Globally, the geographical distributions of species are dynamic and strongly influenced by dispersal. At the same time, range dynamics feed back and may select for increased dispersal at expanding range fronts. This interplay between macroecological and evolutionary dynamics happens almost universally across environmental gradients and such gradients can have a direct impact on the fitness of organisms due to the match or mismatch between an individual's environmental optimum and the current conditions along the gradient....

Data from: Female monkeys use both the carrot and the stick to promote male participation in intergroup fights

T. Jean Marie Arseneau-Robar, Anouk Lisa Taucher, Eliane Müller, Carel Van Schaik, Redouan Bshary & Erik P. Willems
Group-level cooperation often poses a social dilemma in which joint action may be difficult to achieve. Theoretical models and experimental work on humans show that social incentives, such as punishment of defectors and rewarding of cooperators, can promote cooperation in groups of unrelated individuals. Here, we demonstrate that these processes can operate in a non-human animal species, and be used to effectively promote the production of a public good. We took advantage of the fact...

Data from: Herbivore-induced DNA demethylation changes floral signalling and attractiveness to pollinators in Brassica rapa

Florian Schiestl, Philipp Schlüter, Roman Kellenberger, Roman T. Kellenberger, Philipp M. Schlüter & Florian P. Schiestl
Plants have to fine-tune their signals to optimise the trade-off between herbivore deterrence and pollinator attraction. An important mechanism in mediating plant-insect interactions is the regulation of gene expression via DNA methylation. However, the effect of herbivore-induced DNA methylation changes on pollinator-relevant plant signalling has not been systematically investigated. Here, we assessed the impact of foliar herbivory on DNA methylation and floral traits in the model crop plant Brassica rapa. Methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism...

Data from: Gauging the purported costs of public data archiving for long-term population studies

Simon Robin Evans
It was recently proposed that long-term population studies be exempted from the expectation that authors publicly archive the primary data underlying published articles. Such studies are valuable to many areas of ecological and evolutionary biological research, and multiple risks to their viability were anticipated as a result of public data archiving (PDA), ultimately all stemming from independent reuse of archived data. However, empirical assessment was missing, making it difficult to determine whether such fears are...

Data from: Manipulating virulence factor availability can have complex consequences for infections

Michael Weigert, Adin Ross-Gillespie, Anne Leinweber, Gabriella Pessi, Sam P. Brown & Rolf Kuemmerli
Given the rise of bacterial resistance against antibiotics, we urgently need alternative strategies to fight infections. Some propose we should disarm rather than kill bacteria, through targeted disruption of their virulence factors. It is assumed that this approach (i) induces weak selection for resistance because it should only minimally impact bacterial fitness, and (ii) is specific, only interfering with the virulence factor in question. Given that pathogenicity emerges from complex interactions between pathogens, hosts, and...

Data from: Genome assembly and annotation of Arabidopsis halleri, a model for heavy metal hyperaccumulation and evolutionary ecology

Roman V. Briskine, Timothy Paape, Rie Shimizu-Inatsugi, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Satoru Akama, Jun Sese & Kentaro K. Shimizu
The self-incompatible species Arabidopsis halleri is a close relative of the self-compatible model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The broad European and Asian distribution and heavy metal hyperaccumulation ability make A. halleri a useful model for ecological genomics studies. We used long-insert mate-pair libraries to improve the genome assembly of the A. halleri ssp. gemmifera Tada mine genotype (W302) collected from a site with high contamination by heavy metals in Japan. After five rounds of forced selfing,...

Data from: Mate guarding and frequent copulation in birds: a meta-analysis of their relationship to paternity and male phenotype

Anna M.F. Harts, Isobel Booksmythe, Michael D. Jennions & Anna M. F. Harts
In many birds males are presumed to protect their paternity by closely guarding their mate or copulating frequently with her. Both these costly behaviours are assumed to reduce the risk and/or intensity of sperm competition. However, despite many studies on avian extra-pair paternity, it remains unclear how strongly these behaviours are related to fitness and other key life-history traits. Here we conduct meta-analyses to address two questions. First, are mate guarding and/or frequent copulation positively...

Data from: Amino acid change in an orchid desaturase enables mimicry of the pollinator’s sex pheromone

Khalid E. M. Sedeek, Edward Whittle, Daniela Guthörl, Ueli Grossniklaus, John Shanklin & Philipp Schlüter
Mimicry illustrates the power of selection to produce phenotypic convergence in biology [ 1 ]. A striking example is the imitation of female insects by plants that are pollinated by sexual deception of males of the same insect species [ 2–4 ]. This involves mimicry of visual, tactile, and chemical signals of females [ 2–7 ], especially their sex pheromones [ 8–11 ]. The Mediterranean orchid Ophrys exaltata employs chemical mimicry of cuticular hydrocarbons, particularly...

Data from: Infection-induced behavioural changes reduce connectivity and the potential for disease spread in wild mice contact networks

Patricia C. Lopes, Per Block & Barbara König
Infection may modify the behaviour of the host and of its conspecifics in a group, potentially altering social connectivity. Because many infectious diseases are transmitted through social contact, social connectivity changes can impact transmission dynamics. Previous approaches to understanding disease transmission dynamics in wild populations were limited in their ability to disentangle different factors that determine the outcome of disease outbreaks. Here we ask how social connectivity is affected by infection and how this relationship...

Data from: Matrilineal inheritance of a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects

Barbara Tschirren, Ann-Kathrin Ziegler, Joel L. Pick, Monika Okuliarová, Michal Zeman & Mathieu Giraudeau
Sex-linkage is predicted to evolve in response to sex-specific or sexually antagonistic selection. In line with this prediction, most sex-linked genes are associated with reproduction in the respective sex. In addition to traits directly involved in fertility and fecundity, mediators of maternal effects may be predisposed to evolve sex-linkage, because they indirectly affect female fitness through their effect on offspring phenotype. Here, we test for sex-linked inheritance of a key mediator of prenatal maternal effects...

Data from: Spatially cascading effect of perturbations in experimental meta-ecosystems

Eric Harvey, Isabelle Gounand, Pravin Ganesanandamoorthy & Florian Altermatt
Ecosystems are linked to neighbouring ecosystems not only by dispersal, but also by the movement of subsidy. Such subsidy couplings between ecosystems have important landscape-scale implications because perturbations in one ecosystem may affect community structure and functioning in neighbouring ecosystems via increased/decreased subsidies. Here, we combine a general theoretical approach based on harvesting theory and a two-patch protist meta-ecosystem experiment to test the effect of regional perturbations on local community dynamics. We first characterized the...

Data from: Differential neural processing during motor imagery of daily activities in chronic low back pain patients

Andrea Vrana, Sabina Hotz-Boendermaker, Philipp Stämpfli, Jürgen Hänggi, Erich Seifritz, B. Kim Humphreys & Michael L. Meier
Chronic low back pain (chronic LBP) is both debilitating for patients but also a major burden on the health care system. Previous studies reported various maladaptive structural and functional changes among chronic LBP patients on spine- and supraspinal levels including behavioral alterations. However, evidence for cortical reorganization in the sensorimotor system of chronic LBP patients is scarce. Motor Imagery (MI) is suitable for investigating the cortical sensorimotor network as it serves as a proxy for...

Data from: Sex differences and allee effects shape the dynamics of sex-structured invasions

Allison K. Shaw, Hanna Kokko & Michael G. Neubert
The rate at which a population grows and spreads can depend on individual behaviour and interactions with others. In many species with two sexes, males and females differ in key life history traits (e.g. growth, survival, dispersal), which can scale up to affect population rates of growth and spread. In sexually reproducing species, the mechanics of locating mates and reproducing successfully introduce further complications for predicting the invasion speed (spread rate), as both can change...

Data from: The genetic architecture of freezing tolerance varies across the range of Arabidopsis thaliana

Matthew W. Horton, Glenda Willems, Eriko Sasaki, Maarten Koornneef & Magnus Nordborg
The capacity to tolerate freezing temperatures limits the geographical distribution of many plants, including several species of agricultural importance. However, the genes involved in freezing tolerance remain largely unknown. Here, we describe the variation in constitutive freezing tolerance that occurs among worldwide accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that although plants from high latitudes tend to be more freezing tolerant than plants from low latitudes, the environmental factors that shape cold adaptation differ across the...

Data from: The copulatory plug delays ejaculation by rival males and affects sperm competition outcome in house mice

Andreas Sutter & Anna K. Lindholm
Females of many species mate with multiple males (polyandry), resulting in male–male competition extending to post-copulation (sperm competition). Males adapt to such post-copulatory sexual selection by altering features of their ejaculate that increase its competitiveness and/or by decreasing the risk of sperm competition through female manipulation or interference with rival male behaviour. At ejaculation, males of many species deposit copulatory plugs, which are commonly interpreted as a male adaptation to post-copulatory competition and are thought...

Data from: Taxonomic, phylogenetic and ecological diversity of Niphargus (Amphipoda: Crustacea) in the Hölloch cave system (Switzerland)

Cene Fišer, Marjeta Konec, Roman Alther, Vid Švara & Florian Altermatt
Groundwater belongs to the spatially most extensive, but least explored freshwater systems. On a global scale, the species richness of several subterranean invertebrate taxa parallels species richness found in surface waters, while on a local scale species richness hardly exceeds 20 species. This results in a high contribution of groundwater ecosystems to regional β- and γ-diversity, and to a smaller degree to α-diversity, and deserves focused attention. In general, more species are to be found...

Data from: Predation can select for later and more synchronous arrival times in migrating species

Anna M. F. Harts, Nadiah P. Kristensen & Hanna Kokko
For migratory species, the timing of arrival at breeding grounds is an important determinant of fitness. Too early arrival at the breeding ground is associated with various costs, and we focus on one understudied cost: that migrants can experience a higher risk of predation if arriving earlier than the bulk of the breeding population. We show, using both a semi-analytic and simulation model, that predation can select for later arrival. This is because of safety...

Data from: Lifespan and reproductive cost explain interspecific variation in the optimal onset of reproduction

Emeline Mourocq, Pierre Bize, Sandra Bouwhuis, Russell Bradley, Anne Charmantier, Carlos De La Cruz, Szymon Marian Obniak, Richard H. M. Espie, Márton Herenyi, Hermann Hötker, Oliver Kruger, John Marzluff, Anders P. Møller, Shinichi Nakagawa, Richard A. Phillips, Andrew N. Radford, Alexandre Roulin, János Török, Juliana Valencia, Martijn Van De Pol, Ian G. Warkentin, Isabel S. Winney, Andrew G. Wood, Michael Griesser & Szymon M. Drobniak
Fitness can be profoundly influenced by the age at first reproduction (AFR), but to date the AFR-fitness relationship only has been investigated intraspecifically. Here we investigated the relationship between AFR and average lifetime reproductive success (LRS) across 34 bird species. We assessed differences in the deviation of the Optimal AFR (i.e., the species-specific AFR associated with the highest LRS) from the age at sexual maturity, considering potential effects of life-history as well as social and...

Data from: A trait-based trade-off between growth and mortality: evidence from 15 tropical tree species using size-specific RGRs

Christopher D. Philipson, Daisy H. Dent, Michael J. O’Brien, Juliette Chamagne, Dzaeman Dzulkifli, Reuben Nilus, Sam Philips, Glen Reynolds, Philippe Saner, Andy Hector & Michael J. O'Brien
A life-history trade-off between low mortality in the dark and rapid growth in the light is one of the most widely accepted mechanisms underlying plant ecological strategies in tropical forests. Differences in plant functional traits are thought to underlie these distinct ecological strategies; however, very few studies have shown relationships between functional traits and demographic rates within a functional group. We present 8 years of growth and mortality data from saplings of 15 species of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    59

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    59

Affiliations

  • University of Zurich
    59
  • University of Oxford
    6
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    5
  • Australian National University
    4
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • State University of New York
    2